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  1. #1
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    Hayes 9 replace pads = rubbing

    I just replaced the pads on my Hayes 9's for the first time. Other than a few bent rotors I've had no problems with rubbing with these brakes over the last year of service.

    I can't seem to get the pads to not contact the disc. I did a search here and the obvious solution is to remove some fluid from the system, but I don't understand why I would need to do this as it worked fine when I got the bike (and it had new pads). Anyone ever see this problem? I've done a few rides now with the pads rubbing - not fun - but I imagine I'll be moving once I have a free moving back wheel.

    Any ideas appreciated,
    John
    Big Strings, Big Wheels, The Jisch Blog

  2. #2
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
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    when you push the pistons back, do they go all the way back into the caliper? (only if they didn't go back all the way, then you might need to remove fluid)

    are the pads OEM or some 3 party manufacturer..sometimes one brand is thicker than another one..

  3. #3
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    Answers...

    Quote Originally Posted by crisillo
    when you push the pistons back, do they go all the way back into the caliper? (only if they didn't go back all the way, then you might need to remove fluid)

    are the pads OEM or some 3 party manufacturer..sometimes one brand is thicker than another one..
    I can get the pistons to be flush with the caliper with a box wrench, but when I pull the wrench out, the pistons come back out just a little (maybe 1/32nd of an inch) but that's enough to make the pads contact the disc. The pads are Hayes.

    Perhaps that's the issue though, maybe the "new" Hayes pads are thicker than ones that came with the new bike. Sounds fishy, but I really can't come up with any other explanation.

    Thanks for the response!
    John
    Big Strings, Big Wheels, The Jisch Blog

  4. #4
    Scuffed
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    I have exactly the same problem. Rear never gave any problems till now so I can't see how it can be anything to do with air or being overfilled. I spread the pads with the Hayes spacer, refitted them and aligned, spun the wheel, great, then go for a ride and they started rubbing again. After spending hours on it I finally have taken it to my mechanic friend and he is going to reface the caliper mounts as the pads have worn unevenly and are almost worn out and have been rubbing on the springs. I'm not sure it's going to fix the problem but will find out in a couple of days when I get the bike back. I can't seem to get enough clearance between the pads and the rotor so makes aligning it very precise. We'll see.
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  5. #5
    Black Lion
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jisch
    I just replaced the pads on my Hayes 9's for the first time. Other than a few bent rotors I've had no problems with rubbing with these brakes over the last year of service.

    I can't seem to get the pads to not contact the disc. I did a search here and the obvious solution is to remove some fluid from the system, but I don't understand why I would need to do this as it worked fine when I got the bike (and it had new pads). Anyone ever see this problem? I've done a few rides now with the pads rubbing - not fun - but I imagine I'll be moving once I have a free moving back wheel.

    Any ideas appreciated,
    John

    You could have a stuck or sticking piston. With the pads removed push back the pistons and lightly squeeze the lever to see if the pistons are fully retracting after the light squeeze. If not, clean and oil them. It helps to remove the caliper from the bike.
    Voltron

  6. #6
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jisch
    I can get the pistons to be flush with the caliper with a box wrench, but when I pull the wrench out, the pistons come back out just a little (maybe 1/32nd of an inch) but that's enough to make the pads contact the disc. The pads are Hayes.

    Perhaps that's the issue though, maybe the "new" Hayes pads are thicker than ones that came with the new bike. Sounds fishy, but I really can't come up with any other explanation.

    Thanks for the response!
    John
    I would try removing some fluid from the system. Turn the lever over on the bar (bleed hole facing up) and remove the plug, then push the pistons back. A little fluid should ooze out of the bleed hole and you should be able to push the pistons back in the bores.

  7. #7
    squish is good
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    Sounds familiar, my 9s seem to start and stop rubbing randomly throughout the season. I think the left piston decides not to retract at random intervals, I usually push the piston back and it fixes the problem, but you already tried it. I'll be switching brakes when I get the money, it's not a big enough annoyance at this point but I'm no big fan of these brakes.

  8. #8
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    What kind of oil?

    Quote Originally Posted by yogreg
    You could have a stuck or sticking piston. With the pads removed push back the pistons and lightly squeeze the lever to see if the pistons are fully retracting after the light squeeze. If not, clean and oil them. It helps to remove the caliper from the bike.
    YG - thanks for the info - this seems the most reasonable given my situation - however - what kind of oil do you use? I gotta believe things get pretty hot down there.

    John
    Big Strings, Big Wheels, The Jisch Blog

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jisch
    YG - thanks for the info - this seems the most reasonable given my situation - however - what kind of oil do you use? I gotta believe things get pretty hot down there.

    John
    DOT 3 brake fluid. Oil may ruin the seals.

  10. #10
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    My Hayes 9 did the same thing when I replaced the stock pads with Koolstops. The Koolstops were a little thicker. I sanded it down just a bit and after riding a week or so, the rubbing went away..

  11. #11
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    More trouble...

    I'm about this || close to chucking these brakes and buying new ones. I can't believe I'd say that after less than a year. I still have rubbing, though it seems to be subsiding a bit - I think the pads are wearing down to the point where they retract far enough.

    Last night a new problem came up - as I rode along I was getting a slight chirp that, over a period of a minute or two would grow to a loud hum. If I pump the brakes the humming stopped. A few minutes later I'd hear the chirp and right back up to the hum. It seems like the pistons are retracting ok but then they slowly move back in.

    I'll try cleaning out the pistons and see if that helps. I like the idea of oiling them or using brake fluid as a lubricant, but I can't help but think that is a stop gap measure as dirt will stick to whatever I put in there.

    I was thinking of getting in there with an air hose, maybe there's stuff caught in there that could be blown out.

    John
    Big Strings, Big Wheels, The Jisch Blog

  12. #12
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    Issue resolution

    I think I resolved my problem, figured I'd post it up here in case anyone does a search later on down the road.

    I took the pads out, squeezed the lever a bit to get the pistons out - not an all out squeeze, but a few careful small ones. I got the pads about 1/4" or so out - maybe a bit less than that. Then I blew them off with an air compressor. A lot of dust came out. I hit as many angles as I could. I pushed the pistons back in, remounted the pads and it looks good. For the first time in 3 weeks I have no brake rub. We'll see if it lasts.

    John
    Big Strings, Big Wheels, The Jisch Blog

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