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  1. #1
    hands up who wants to die
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    good source for rotor bolts (hex)

    I officially hate 6-bolt rotor mounting torx bolts. Besides having to carry an extra tool, those tiny little torx wrenches strip out like crazy.

    Does anyone know a source for the correct size & length hex bolts, so that I can switch all 4 of my bikes over? I'm not sure what quality of bolt I need either. I can order from McMaster-Carr if I can just determine the proper specs. I'm looking for steel here, not ti.

    thx
    -rob in NY
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  2. #2
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    The torx bolts don't strip easily. Use a higher quality tool.

    I think Hope offers Hex rotor bolts though.

  3. #3
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
    Reputation: crisillo's Avatar
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    I second Will on this.... the torx bolts are a lot harder to strip.... that's actually why they come in torx and not hex.... I once received some hex bolts with a Hope rotor and I specifically got some torx bolts NOT to use the hex ones...

    get a better tool....

  4. #4
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    Local bolt supply store should have a match in 18/8 stainless. Ours does.

    Also Allen key head.

  5. #5
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  6. #6
    Meh.
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    Actually the torx allows more contact area. As long as you're using a decent tool (genuine Torx drive and not some cheap knockoff) and inserting it straight in, it's not likely to slip or strip.

    And be careful with the allen heads, if the profile is too tall, it will chew out a nice little section of your fork lowers.

    With the hex, point to surface contact between the drive tool and the fastener head leads to rapid tool wear and can distort as the torque increases.

    The 60 degree drive angle is inefficient for torque transfer.

    Stress is concentrated at the corners.

    Torx uses a 15 degree drive angle. High torque transfer and reduced radial forces.

    All in all - torx minimizes tool slippage and liklihood to strip.
    Last edited by XSL_WiLL; 02-14-2007 at 11:08 PM.

  7. #7
    Going for a ride......
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    Doesn't it depend on the quality of the bolts as well?
    I use the torx tool from my Park Multitool when I took off my rotors and ended up stripping one bolt (Hayes Sole brakes), not to mention the lever bar clamp bolts as well. I've also read of others stripping the Hayes torx bolts mind you one case was because they tried to use a hex key.

    I would agree though, a good torx bolt should be harder to strip than an allen head primarily due to more points and steeper angles.
    energetix



  8. #8
    MTB B'dos
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    Can't agree!

    I can't agree that it's a shoddy tool being used that strips the TORX heads. I have received several brake rotors/brakes and they all came with a Torx type allen key and it does not fit properly, I have even used a socket Torx bit - None of them fit the bolts properly. Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't the size a T6 Torx used for brakes? I use this size bit and it just doesn't fit snug and you have to be very careful when torquing them down.
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  9. #9
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
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    T25 is the torx size used on disc rotors

  10. #10
    LA CHÈVRE
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    The torx bolts don't strip easily. Use a higher quality tool.

    I think Hope offers Hex rotor bolts though.
    The Hope rotor bolts are hex and made of very soft alloy... not good.

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  11. #11
    newbie
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    I stipped 2 of my hex bolts so I used my dremel, cut a slot, and made them to accept a flat head screwdriver. Hasn't stripped since.

    Also if you have money unlike me you can buy new ones at a bike shop or online (google: bike brake rotor bolts)

  12. #12
    MTB B'dos
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    That's it

    .....
    Quote Originally Posted by crisillo
    T25 is the torx size used on disc rotors
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  13. #13
    Meh.
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    The allen key provided is more a gesture of courtesy than anything else. It blows. As I said, genuine Torx products.

  14. #14
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    Try Ebay

    Quote Originally Posted by rpet
    I officially hate 6-bolt rotor mounting torx bolts. Besides having to carry an extra tool, those tiny little torx wrenches strip out like crazy.

    Does anyone know a source for the correct size & length hex bolts, so that I can switch all 4 of my bikes over? I'm not sure what quality of bolt I need either. I can order from McMaster-Carr if I can just determine the proper specs. I'm looking for steel here, not ti.

    thx
    -rob in NY
    I got 2 dozen Stainless hex bolts on ebay for less than $10 delivered. Seller was RideBXC_dotcom.
    Nice quality.

  15. #15
    hands up who wants to die
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    Does Torx produce a driver small enough to carry along on a ride? Like I said, I really don't want to have to carry extra tools besides my typical multitool. My typical multitool allen keys don't strip, my multitool's Torx driver always strips (after about 3 uses).

    thx

    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    The allen key provided is more a gesture of courtesy than anything else. It blows. As I said, genuine Torx products.
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  16. #16
    hands up who wants to die
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    perfecto. <3

    Quote Originally Posted by Micka
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  17. #17
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
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    I just don't carry a torx with me...luckily I have never needed it... I do check them at home "quite often"... same reason I don't carry cone wrenches to adjust the XT hubs on my SS on the trail
    Last edited by crisillo; 02-16-2007 at 11:48 AM.

  18. #18
    Meh.
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    The only reason I would see needing to carry torx drivers on the trail is if you totally trashed a rotor. And if you did, who cares if you trash the bolts? You're getting new ones anyways.

  19. #19
    "El Whatever"
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpet
    Does Torx produce a driver small enough to carry along on a ride? Like I said, I really don't want to have to carry extra tools besides my typical multitool. My typical multitool allen keys don't strip, my multitool's Torx driver always strips (after about 3 uses).

    thx
    That's why you should use a torque wrench and loctite on the rotor bolts... so you don't have to carry an extra tool.

    As Will says... what in earht do you have to do to a properly installed rotor for the bolts to come loose?

    There's even those Shimano shims that you can use to avoid the bolts coming off loose?

    Another point to consider... do you see feasible to replace a rotor on the trail? If so, you must be carrying a rotor with you and then the "extra" Torx tool is not that much of a weight penalty.

    All in all, and in the best of spirits... do your homework wrenching. Brakes are one of those things where you should take no chances.
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  20. #20
    hands up who wants to die
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    I use loctite, and no my bolts have never come loose.

    yes, i've destroyed rotors on the trail... and most riders I know have done the same at least once. Being able to remove it is nice.

    -r
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  21. #21
    Sofa King We Todd Did
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    I don't get all this talk about carrying around an extra tool on the trails. Doesn't everyone carry a multitool with them? And don't most, if not all, multitools these days come with a torx wrench? I've got a few and I know they all have torx wrenches that fit the standard rotor bolts.

    That said, I've successfully stripped a couple of torx rotor bolts which means that the rotor is now stuck to the wheel with no way of removing it easily. I'd give my kingdom for torx rotor bolts that aren't made of butter.

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