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  1. #1
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    Reputation: iRide4fun's Avatar
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    Front Disc Brake Problem

    I purchase a mongoose RX-200 the other day. Now I know that the bike to many is junk, but I purchased it to get back into riding and better shape. When I move back into some more serious riding I'll be looking into something better of course. Although I have heard that these bike can take some punishment.

    Now the issue that I am having is that the front brakes they are weak. I tried adjusting them and they did get better but not good enough. When I attempt to stop using the fronts they just slow the bike down slowly. I pulled the pads and took a look at them and the one looked fine and the other was flaking apart.

    So I took a trip to a bike shop and when they looked worn. So with that I didn't care to much and just picked up a pair of avid organic pads. Put them in when i got home but I am still having stopping issues.

    Now I'm not sure if I'm just not adjusting them correctly (First time dealing with disc brakes). Or could it just deal with the caliper itself?

    Any help will be appreciated until then I'm going to continue messing with them.

  2. #2
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
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    New brake pads must be "bed in" with the rotor they are being used with. Usually a few good rides will do or get up to speed and grab the brakes hard....repeat 20 or 40 or 100 times, whatever is needed. I prefer to just ride.

  3. #3
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    to safely achieve optimal results, remain seated on
    the bike during the entire bed-in procedure.
    1. Accelerate the bike to a moderate speed
    (approximately 19 kilometers or 12 miles per
    hour), then firmly apply the brakes until you are
    at walking speed. Repeat approximately twenty
    times.
    2. Accelerate the bike to a faster speed
    (approximately 32 kilometers or 20 miles per
    hour). Then very firmly and suddenly apply the
    brakes until you are at walking speed. Repeat
    approximately ten times.
    important: do not lock up the wheels at any point
    during the bed-in procedure.
    3. Allow the brakes to cool prior to any additional
    riding.
    this concludes the disc brake pad and rotor bed-in
    procedure.

    my 2 cents allow time for the rotors to cool between each application of the brakes.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  4. #4
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    Reputation: iRide4fun's Avatar
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    It would have been great if that was explained somewhere with the bikes manual. Well I thank you for that information. I'm going to have to get started on that tomorrow.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    to safely achieve optimal results, remain seated on
    the bike during the entire bed-in procedure.
    1. Accelerate the bike to a moderate speed
    (approximately 19 kilometers or 12 miles per
    hour), then firmly apply the brakes until you are
    at walking speed. Repeat approximately twenty
    times.
    2. Accelerate the bike to a faster speed
    (approximately 32 kilometers or 20 miles per
    hour). Then very firmly and suddenly apply the
    brakes until you are at walking speed. Repeat
    approximately ten times.
    important: do not lock up the wheels at any point
    during the bed-in procedure.
    3. Allow the brakes to cool prior to any additional
    riding.
    this concludes the disc brake pad and rotor bed-in
    procedure.

    my 2 cents allow time for the rotors to cool between each application of the brakes.
    This is great information and may also help in reducing brake squeal.

  6. #6
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    Reputation: winter's Avatar
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    If your bike was a display model, its pads and rotors might have been contaminated by oily hands of other customers who just ate some McDonald's fries with their bare hands. Perform the bed-in process as outlined by mitzikatzi, if that doesn't work, then a good cleaning of the rotor and pads with isopropyl alcohol or automotive brake cleaner might do the trick.
    Go on ahead, I'm gonna take a breather.

  7. #7
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    I did give the rotor a good cleaning that day I got it and it was bad. I just started the bedding process. Did 5 runs so far at about 10-15 mph and man am I tired. That just shows how bad of shape I am in. At least it's nice and cool out today!!

  8. #8
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    I've got similar brakes on a Kent, I make sure the inside pad is as close to the rotor as possible and adjust the cable slack, if that doesn't work some light sand paper and rubbing alcohol. Make sure your not touching the braking surfaces with your fingersfingers

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