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  1. #1
    just ride
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    EXTREME COLD brake question.

    I plan on riding the Arrowhead 135 this year, and am currently building my snow bike.

    I have two brake sets that I might use, and I am looking for your inputs on these selections. Both were chosen for their running of DOT fluid, which is inherently better in the cold than Mineral Oil systems.

    First is a set of Avid Juicy Carbons, I bought them because of the full stainless hardware, replaced the carbon lever with alloy, and replaced the housings with a Goodridge set with stainless hardware, so that all parts are stainless or alloy.

    Second set is a completely stock set of Hope Mono Minis. 08 version.

    This race is 135 miles in temperatures as low as 60 degrees below zero, and averaging around 15 degrees below zero.

    Any input?
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  2. #2
    The UseLess Program Guy
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    Have you tried kerosene? I filled up my friend's Tektro Auriga with kerosene and it works BETTER than the mineral oil, needs LESS finger power and brakes MORE. Here in Quebec we have this kind of temperature so use kerosene and don't worry.
    I don't believe that humans can change. Seen it, though.

  3. #3
    Harrumph
    Reputation: G-reg's Avatar
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    Avid BB7, cables don't freeze or leak. Crap, throw a Canti on there and you will NOT be lacking for the Arrowhead. It's not exactly a DH race.
    Slowly slipping to retrogrouchyness

  4. #4
    just ride
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-reg
    Avid BB7, cables don't freeze or leak. Crap, throw a Canti on there and you will NOT be lacking for the Arrowhead. It's not exactly a DH race.

    I have ruled out the BB7, as I do not care for their reliability. I have had the cam loosen enough to let the bearings fall out before.

    In addition, rim brakes are entirely a bad idea on snow bikes, for a ton of reasons.

    I weigh 250 and will be carrying around 25 lbs of load, as well as 8-12 lbs of water.
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  5. #5
    just ride
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soviet123
    Have you tried kerosene? I filled up my friend's Tektro Auriga with kerosene and it works BETTER than the mineral oil, needs LESS finger power and brakes MORE. Here in Quebec we have this kind of temperature so use kerosene and don't worry.
    No, I havent tried that, but it sounds like a great idea. I am running a Rohloff hub as well on the same bike, and I read the same thing about those, to run them with kerosene in the cold.

    Does this have any negative effects?
    MTBR Disclaimer: I work for Salsa Cycles
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  6. #6
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    In general, DOT fluids will work better in such cold. You should try a change, first thing, with fresh fluid. Second, use some 5.1, due to the supposedly lower viscosity.

  7. #7
    Harrumph
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    Quote Originally Posted by chequamagon
    No, I havent tried that, but it sounds like a great idea. I am running a Rohloff hub as well on the same bike, and I read the same thing about those, to run them with kerosene in the cold.

    Does this have any negative effects?
    I do know of Rolhoffs having problems when the temps get down around -20 to -30, lesser internal hubs that use grease don't seem to care much.

    My shoulder is still recovering from Chequamagon this year so I think subconsciously I want to rain on your parade. So here's a friendly suggestion to prove it's nothing personal: Use a Carbon Handlebar. The Al bar is a giant heat sink, then moving through cold air on the front of a bike. Grab the grip of a Al bar and a Carbon bar after riding in really cold weather, the carbon bar will feel damn near warm.
    Slowly slipping to retrogrouchyness

  8. #8
    Ologist
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    I second the BB7s. They have proven to be the most reliable and 'the choice' up here in Alaska.

  9. #9
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    I don't know, in "gentle" sub-freezing temps, I've seen several frozen BB7's.

  10. #10
    i ride bikez!!11!
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    I've had frozen BB7's. Snow packs up in the arm and it can't move freely. Boo.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by chequamagon
    No, I havent tried that, but it sounds like a great idea. I am running a Rohloff hub as well on the same bike, and I read the same thing about those, to run them with kerosene in the cold.

    Does this have any negative effects?
    Kerosene is a very poor lubricant, it is generally used as a solvent. I would suggest you try to find a very light weight synthetic lubricating oil.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by chequamagon
    No, I havent tried that, but it sounds like a great idea. I am running a Rohloff hub as well on the same bike, and I read the same thing about those, to run them with kerosene in the cold.

    Does this have any negative effects?
    If you are running a rohloff, you should be adding ~10ml pure kerosene to the hub - which is rohloff's recomendation. Mine have all needed it below freezing, or you will get miss-shifts or unwanted neurals. Check with the alaska forum - there are a number of users there.

    Never tried it in hydraulic brakes yet. But I have not had issue with the fluid - mineral oil or dot. It's always been the seals getting to stiff, and pistons not retracing. Mechs have been OK, unless you are riding on salted roads & slush - then the mechanical adjusters tend to seize.

  13. #13
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    You could ask on the Norwegian forum www.terrengsykkel.no. do it in the ymse-part of it..
    Why? Lots of cold here..

  14. #14
    Keep on Rockin...
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    Yep.

    Quote Originally Posted by xmynameisdan
    I've had frozen BB7's. Snow packs up in the arm and it can't move freely. Boo.

    Big BB7 fan here but my rear brake freezes up on me often.

  15. #15
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    Not good to hear that a BB7 caliper arm can freeze. I've installed them at the end of last winter and only 2 rides with cold temperatures (without a problem). Or do you speak of freezing the cable movement because of interrupted housing?

  16. #16
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    I rode BB7's all through a Wisconsin winter and they never failed. From what I've read, Hydros will be better though.

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