Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Twiggyperson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    302

    New question here. Disk pad break in

    Is it ok to break in new Hayes pads in the rain? I'm about to ride about 3 mile to work, level and downhill, so I need to know If I can put new pads, or should I wait till it dries up?
    Im just saying..

  2. #2
    nnn
    nnn is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nnn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    799
    It's actually better to break pads in the wet than dry. If you can, as well, rub some mud onto the rotors that proves really a lot of the times.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,157
    Quote Originally Posted by Twiggyperson
    Is it ok to break in new Hayes pads in the rain? I'm about to ride about 3 mile to work, level and downhill, so I need to know If I can put new pads, or should I wait till it dries up?

    Breaking in pads in the wet is fine. Never have heard of it being better as per nnn.

    Just remember that if your only riding for 3 miles that will probably not be enough to break them in at one go. Unless it is 3 miles of DH. Then maybe they would be broken in

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Twiggyperson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    302

    Mud?

    isnt mud gonna etch the rotors? I barely got by with new pads, but I certainly cant afford $80 worth of new rotors. Anyways, I just went with the old pads, but I got drentched. Now the pads squeal REALLY bad, and they rub too. I think the might have absorbed water and swolen up? I guess I'll change pads after it dries. Asuming that'll happen.....
    Im just saying..

  5. #5
    nnn
    nnn is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nnn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    799
    Sorry if I'm wrong there but I remember there being something about pouring water over the rotor to break the pads in for one of the hope systems so I assumed it's similar for other calipers perhaps the water heats up and dissolves nasty stuff and removes the glazing...not sure

  6. #6
    pj.
    pj. is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pj.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    53
    Technically your supposed to break the pads in by heating them up to what’s known as “green fade”. Then let the cool then down – some claim better results by quenching with water when hot.

    If you do the above the pads will last the longest.

    However, some (most?) people don’t bother, and just take it easy until they start to work, some sling mud of the rotors to speed up the break in period.

  7. #7
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,377

    they're brakes, not fine china

    just ride and break them in. During a lull, try reading the FAQ here to get educated. Let your eyes wander to the upper right..see the disc??

    Jim MCM #11

  8. #8
    Professional Nerd
    Reputation: Danimal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    120
    jeez, I come from an automotive background...so all of this sounds crazy to me. I know that automotive rotors get hotter than MTB rotors, but I would still think that quenching such a thin disc when hot will cause warpage.

    75% of rotor warpage on automobiles comes from hard braking...then hitting a puddle and drenching the rotor.

    -Danimal

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Grumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    744
    Quote Originally Posted by Danimal
    jeez, I come from an automotive background...so all of this sounds crazy to me. I know that automotive rotors get hotter than MTB rotors, but I would still think that quenching such a thin disc when hot will cause warpage.

    75% of rotor warpage on automobiles comes from hard braking...then hitting a puddle and drenching the rotor.

    -Danimal
    It is crazy, bike discs should be broken in just like most other discs; with light application until the pads are at least partially bedded. The dirt and mud on MTB brakes is not such a bad thing though, mud acts as a mild abrasive and beds the pads more quickly (and also acts as a light lubricant to keep them from squealing.)

    New brakes should not be heated up and no disc should ever be quenched with water. (on purpose)

Similar Threads

  1. XT disk brake break in?
    By Lawn Dart in forum Cannondale
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-03-2005, 09:28 AM
  2. Hayes mech. break in period
    By spacoli in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-02-2005, 02:42 PM
  3. XT how much clearance between pad and disk?
    By turbotai in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-25-2004, 11:05 AM
  4. Avid disk pad... retention ears?
    By hedgehog in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-05-2004, 08:03 AM
  5. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-01-2004, 05:45 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •