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  1. #1
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    Disco Brake Pads - Amazing!

    Just installed a set of Semi Metalic Disco Brake Pads on my Titus El Guapo. I can't be happier. $25 shipped for 4 sets of pads off of ebay.

    Fast shipping, well packaged.

    Best part is these babies are SILENT. After a year+ on the stock Hayes pads that made rock grinding noises everywhere these are a god send. Fast break in. We'll see how well they wear but at that price and performance who cares.

    http://www.discobrakes.com/



  2. #2
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    What's the word, how did these things wear?

  3. #3
    Legend
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTBCanuck
    What's the word, how did these things wear?
    You DO realize he posted 4 hours ago, right?

  4. #4
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    Haha, no I didn't- still a bit of a forum newb. I think I saw his membership date and assumed his post was from '08. I'll come back to this one.

  5. #5
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    i get the black ones,semi metalic, that are softer and they stop great,make no noise and if i keep the rotors clean and try to use the brakes more on smooth stretches of trail they last well. They suck when its wet though, maybe all pads are like this though. I found out the expensive way that ceramic suck. The sintered look interesting for wet and are probably worth an 8$ gamble

  6. #6
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    Ceramic are crap if you're ever going to get them wet. I don't know who NEVER get's their Mt. Bike wet but they need to grow a set and throw away those ceramics.

    They do last longer...if they don't kill you first.
    Last edited by pbbreath; 05-20-2011 at 11:31 AM.

  7. #7
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    Extremely happy with the semi-metalics for the Juicy/Elixir brakes. On my rear Juicy brake originals lasted 2000km of trail riding. These from discobrakes have passed 1600km and still going.

    Sintered weren't so great on my front SLX. Never got the bite, even after 30-40 stops during pad-in and 60km of trails.

  8. #8
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    I just ordered a set on metal sintered.

    I got my brakes in March and blew thew the stock pads on a wet, muddy race last week.

    Any idea what the shipping time is from Disco?

  9. #9
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    I got the organic pads for my Mono Minis once. I had no brake power, and they overheated like crazy all the time. Everything was set up correctly, and rotors and pads were sterile. I went back to Hope Stock sintered pads.

    I might try the Disco Sintered pads next.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonw9
    I just ordered a set on metal sintered.
    I got my brakes in March and blew thew the stock pads on a wet, muddy race last week.
    Any idea what the shipping time is from Disco?
    I got mine on ebay so I couldn't tell you if you bought them direct. Mine came in about 5 days.

  11. #11
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    I've got them on my trail bike using Magura Louise FR brakes and I agree that the sintered do work well and seem to be lasting well (going on six months of regular use in all kinds of conditions, snow/ice/wet/mud/dry).

    They make abhorrent noise when wet though, but that could be specific to my brakes, my brake model, or the install on my bike. Sooo many variables.

    But Maggie pads *never* made noise.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    I got the organic pads for my Mono Minis once. I had no brake power, and they overheated like crazy all the time. Everything was set up correctly, and rotors and pads were sterile. I went back to Hope Stock sintered pads.

    I might try the Disco Sintered pads next.
    Me too, got some of their regular pads for my Formula B4 and they had very little grip.
    Also, the backing plates seem to fit very poorly, and tend to bind, so I had to file them quite a bit to free them up.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonw9 View Post
    I just ordered a set on metal sintered.

    I got my brakes in March and blew thew the stock pads on a wet, muddy race last week.

    Any idea what the shipping time is from Disco?
    The brakes arrived today, so delivery was about 5 days, standard USPS.

    Installed with no issues. I have not ridden them all in order to provide an opinion.

  14. #14
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    I have been using Disco Brakes semi metallics for over a year here in Oregon.I can usually get about 4 or 5 months of wet and muddy riding on a set.They perform great for me and the price is right!

  15. #15
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    I've been using the discobrakes ultralight pads for about a month and the performance is identical to the semi-metallic pads they replaced. Indeed the alu backing may be able to get rid of heat quicker than the normal steel backing.

  16. #16
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    IMO,All disc brakes make the same noise when wet.Here in Oregon when a group of us are riding when its wet,we sound like a bunch of bull elk giving there mating call thru the woods! HA!

  17. #17
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    I do find it a bit strange when people say they have got through a set of pads in a single (but hard) race.. are they just unlucky or are some pad (brands and material wise) just really that bad..

    I use a set of Ceramic pads from Brake Authority and I just do not see the issues others have had with ceramics - mine are set up on 203mm rotors with a Hope M6 upfront and M4 at rear and even in the sickest of conditions (and I must admit I hate getting wet) they are as sharp as I could wish for in the dry - so I am guessing that simplistically, not all pads are made equal, regardless of the material being used as I would not go back to organic or metaliic pads now.. mileage wise, I am guessing that I have got a good 2000 miles out of mine so far and they are still looking like new.. for me, they are worth the extra money though at first I had to be pushed to buy them.

  18. #18
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    I did a ~10 mile jaunt through one of the local trails yesterday.

    The brakes didn't seem to have the "bite" the OEM pads did. It was kind of like riding with anti-locks. I did bed them as I have done with other sets of pads. Finding a hill to repeat is kind of tough.

    By the end of the ride they were stopping better, but not great.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by EFMax View Post
    I do find it a bit strange when people say they have got through a set of pads in a single (but hard) race.. are they just unlucky or are some pad (brands and material wise) just really that bad..

    I use a set of Ceramic pads from Brake Authority and I just do not see the issues others have had with ceramics - mine are set up on 203mm rotors with a Hope M6 upfront and M4 at rear and even in the sickest of conditions (and I must admit I hate getting wet) they are as sharp as I could wish for in the dry - so I am guessing that simplistically, not all pads are made equal, regardless of the material being used as I would not go back to organic or metaliic pads now.. mileage wise, I am guessing that I have got a good 2000 miles out of mine so far and they are still looking like new.. for me, they are worth the extra money though at first I had to be pushed to buy them.

    i dunno the ceramics i got from discobrakes were physically too fat to fit on my marta calipers. So i took off some material and they still didnt seem to have the stopping power of the semi or organic, but perhaps longevity is more their clame to fame

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by natrat View Post
    i dunno the ceramics i got from discobrakes were physically too fat to fit on my marta calipers. So i took off some material and they still didnt seem to have the stopping power of the semi or organic, but perhaps longevity is more their clame to fame
    Maybe.. to me 12 months hard use is good for me so any longer is always better.. I assume these pads are similar to high power sports car pads so I would expect better performance.. maybe I am lucky but my stopping distance on my set up has seriously improved and now I take risks in places where before I just was not willing to chance it.. different setups I guess.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by natrat View Post
    i dunno the ceramics i got from discobrakes were physically too fat to fit on my marta calipers. So i took off some material and they still didnt seem to have the stopping power of the semi or organic, but perhaps longevity is more their clame to fame
    You do realize of course over the life of your pads the brake pistons slowly move towards the rotor to make for the thickness of your waining pads. Therefor when you get new ones you have to push the pistons back in displacing brake fluid.

    I've seen some tight ones but I've never seen or heard of pads that just didn't fit.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by pbbreath View Post
    You do realize of course over the life of your pads the brake pistons slowly move towards the rotor to make for the thickness of your waining pads. Therefor when you get new ones you have to push the pistons back in displacing brake fluid.

    I've seen some tight ones but I've never seen or heard of pads that just didn't fit.
    too much material combined with slightly thicker magura rotors

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bear View Post
    I've got them on my trail bike using Magura Louise FR brakes and I agree that the sintered do work well and seem to be lasting well (going on six months of regular use in all kinds of conditions, snow/ice/wet/mud/dry).

    They make abhorrent noise when wet though, but that could be specific to my brakes, my brake model, or the install on my bike. Sooo many variables.

    But Maggie pads *never* made noise.
    Read the bit from Magura down the bottom of Tech FAQ: Finding Pad Perfection

    "From Magura: Magura does not use sintered or metallic pads only organic. Organic pads run cooler that the other pads. Using metallic or sintered pads will void the warranty of the brake and could cause them to overheat. Only use genuine Magura brake pads in Magura brakes."

  24. #24
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    I've run the ceramic hard, C, and it worked ok. It was good for the $20 price. They did well in winter (rain, mud).

    I've also run the S compound. They have a very faint squeak, but you have to listen for it. For $8, they are a great value.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  25. #25
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    Rear Pads are worn out front pads have about 70% left.

    I think that's pretty fair to get 5 months of DH, AM & XC out of em and really I got 2 sets front and rear for $24 so I can afford $6 worth of rear brake pads a little more than twice a year.

    Overall I do think they stop about 80% as well as the stock pads did which is fine for me because I have Stroker Ace 4 piston brakes.


    I'd still suggest em.

  26. #26
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    Weird, I just bought a set this morning of eBay, thinking "hell, why not.". Looks like I'll be alright.

  27. #27
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    I bought their ceramic pads after reading all the glowing claims on the web site. They would fade like crazy on steep and long downhills. They were so bad that I completely wrote off all Disco products. If the metallics work for you, great, but don't assume other compounds will work for you.

  28. #28
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    I know this is a zombie thread, but it's the right topic so I'm going to throw in my two cents.

    My current brake setup:
    Calipers: Avid BBDB (the ancestor of the BB7)
    Discs: Magura VentiDisc 160mm (because they look cool)
    Levers: Avid Speed Dial Ti (adjustable brake leverage)
    Cables: Jagwire Ripcord (compressionless housings)

    All of this stuff is mounted on a Pro-Flex 756, which is an old-school FSXC frame -- the only other frames that put *less* of the rider's weight on the rear wheel are road bikes. So it's great for not accidentally wheelie-ing on steep climbs, but on descents it'll put the fear of God in you. And because there's relatively little weight on the rear wheel, the rear wheel isn't terribly useful for braking, even on dry pavement.

    The stock sintered-bronze pads that came with the Avid BBDBs have so much grip that I couldn't put enough pressure on the rear brake to keep the pads clean, and they kept glazing-over with brake dust. So I got that nasty squeaking sound whenever I used the rear brake. I didn't want to downgrade to a 140mm rotor in the rear, because I'd have to get rid of the cool-looking VentiDisc, and I also didn't want to have to break-in another rotor. (I dunno why, but it always takes forever for me to break-in rotors, even when I ride 5 days a week.) So the next solution was to find a lower-friction pad for the rear brake, so I could put more pressure on the pads to keep them scraped-clean without skidding the rear wheel.

    I tried the kevlar-and-bronze "organic" pads that Avid offers, but after a couple rides they started to make an irritating scraping sound; I think it's because the kevlar bits wore down faster than the bronze bits, so the bronze bits stuck out a tiny bit and scraped along the edges of the cross-drilled holes in the rotor. I tried about five different brands of kevlar-and-bronze "organic" pads, all with the same result.

    Then I found DiscoBrakes. I ordered a set of their Kevlar pads, and discovered to my delight that they're kevlar-and-*copper* instead of kevlar-and-bronze. The copper is much softer than bronze, so the copper bits wear-down evenly with the kevlar bits, and they don't make any irritating sounds. Perfectly silent. And because they're a low-friction pad, I can apply enough force to keep the pads scraped clean without locking the rear wheel, which is exactly what I needed. After a full season of use multiple times a week, the first set of pads is still going strong. I ordered several extra pairs in case I can't find them in the future.

    So if you need a lower-friction pad for your rear brake, the DiscoBrakes Kevlar pad is an excellent choice. Keep in mind that a brand-new rotor may chew them up with all its rough edges, but a broken-in rotor should treat the pads well. So it might be a good idea to break-in a new rotor using sintered pads (or just some junk pads that you hate).

    - - -

    One last thing: in case anyone here is familiar with Pro-Flex frames and thinks I'm lying, I had a disc mount welded onto the rear swingarm, which is why I can use a rear disc brake with that frame.

  29. #29
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    Disco Brake Pads - Amazing!

    Very cool , pics of the proflex would be great. Love the old bikes that just keep trucking.

    Bill

  30. #30
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    Here you go.




  31. #31
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    Hi all,

    Did someone has long term experience with sintered from disco?
    I have a set of semi-metallic compound for XTR M985 (SLx 666 in fact).
    Quite nice power and last ok, but I have a "crunching" noise on front, probably due to uneven wear (180mm hayes disc).
    I used kevlar ones on previous bike, and they were ok also, but I fear they cannot hold new bike well (for true mountain use) and last no more than shimano organic (ie fast wear).

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mac_Aravan View Post
    Hi all,

    Did someone has long term experience with sintered from disco?
    I have a set of semi-metallic compound for XTR M985 (SLx 666 in fact).
    Quite nice power and last ok, but I have a "crunching" noise on front, probably due to uneven wear (180mm hayes disc).
    I used kevlar ones on previous bike, and they were ok also, but I fear they cannot hold new bike well (for true mountain use) and last no more than shimano organic (ie fast wear).
    Hi Mac,

    Unfortunately I had a nervous breakdown about a month after my last post in this thread, and I've been trying to recover for the past three years, so I haven't been riding much because muscle tension aggravates my nervous system and caused a few panic attacks in the past. However, that hasn't been much of a problem this year, so I've been riding more.

    I'm still using the same set of DiscoBrakes kevlar pads on the rear of both my bikes, and I'm still using OEM sintered pads on the front of both my bikes. I don't think the DiscoBrakes kevlar pads would be very good for the front brake, because the front brake works so much harder; I think the kevlar pads would be shredded by the extra load. They're great rear pads though.

    I realize this information probably does you no good now, but maybe it will help someone else.

  33. #33
    Anytime. Anywhere.
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    I just ordered up some sintered pads for my Shimano brakes. I had some a couple years back and they were great, hopefully these are the same.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  34. #34
    fuggansonofahowa
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    Big Discobrake fan - purchased some sintered for my Guides, but have yet to try them.

    That 756 is cherry.....Proflex was a trendsetter. I got some crap riding a full suspension on the trails back in the day. Same crap pushing d-bags ride full squish today. "Dig-in"!
    All Mountain: If you are pedaling in your highest gears, you are doing it wrong.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawseman View Post
    Big Discobrake fan - purchased some sintered for my Guides, but have yet to try them.

    That 756 is cherry.....Proflex was a trendsetter. I got some crap riding a full suspension on the trails back in the day. Same crap pushing d-bags ride full squish today. "Dig-in"!
    Thanks! I bought it for $537, sight unseen, from Irvine Bike Source via phone-order in 1998. It came with cantilever brakes, pinned-together rims with no surface smoothing, and friction-damped elastomer shocks. $2000 in upgrades and one car crash later, it's still rollin'.

    My dad thought I was insane to spend FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS on a bicycle. Then I crashed it into the side of a car that cut in front of me, hard enough to launch myself clear over the hood of the car *and* launch the bike clear over *me*, and all it needed to work right was re-truing the front wheel and tweaking the Girvin Vector fork a bit. Then he understood why it cost so much money; he conceded that a cheaper bike probably would've just collapsed and smeared me across the hood of that car.

    Years later, when I replaced the front wheel to add a disc brake, I took apart the front hub and discovered I hit the car so hard I spalled the hardened-steel bearing races -- not just dented them, but actually chipped pieces off, leaving jagged pits in the surface. It's a testament to Shimano quality that the hub still worked after sustaining damage like that.

  36. #36
    fuggansonofahowa
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    Quite a story. Mine went to MTB heaven only a few years ago....maybe around the time you posted those pictures. Bushings shot, shock mounts warn bad, just too much to justify on a heavily-used and an almost 20 year old aluminum frame.

    Thanks again for sharing. Made my week.

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