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  1. #1
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    Disc rotors, does it matter what brand?

    I just picked up an extra set of wheels for the bicycle that I am using on my Fluid trainer so that I don't need to worry about changing tires if I want to go for a ride and I got the wheel set, tubes, tires and cassette, what I don't have is a set of rotors for the new wheel set.

    My question is do the brake rotors that I buy have to match what is on the other wheel set/brake set? or can I but any old 6 bolt 160mm rotor and bolt it onto the wheel?

    Thanks for any help.
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  2. #2
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    If it was me and you were only going to use the wheels on the trainer I would just put a spacer in the caliper. If you are set on putting rotors on then I would try to get the same to keep pad wear consistent. It's not that big of a deal though as long as the brake track of the new rotor is large enough for your pads.

  3. #3
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    If the wheels are just for the trainer why even bother to put rotors on? But I'd imagine you will use them outside sometimes so you should probably put something on there. I've had Shimano brakes feel less powerful with other brands rotors but not to an unsafe level. In the end a 160 rotor is a 160 rotor regardless of who made it. Different brands do have slight variations in thickness and when they start to wear it gets tricky. I think the best thing to do would be to get brand new rotors for your A wheels and put the used ones on the B wheels.

  4. #4
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    It seems like a good idea to use the same brand? who needs the hassle.Rotors can be different thickness as noted above, that can be a pain in the rectum.

  5. #5
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    The new set of wheels is for the road and I am using the old set for the trainer, Not putting rotors on the set that will be on the trainer seems like half assing something to me. I don't want to take the old rotors off of the old wheels and put them on the new set only to have a set of wheels that can only be used on the trainer because of the lack of brakes so is the consensus that if possible get the same rotors that are on the first set of wheels but using any rotor should work?

    Thanks for the replies so far guys.
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  6. #6
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    I'd say go with the same brand rotors as your brakes. Not all rotors are created equal. Braking track width and rotor thickness are the two most common differences. Diameter usually isn't an issue, a 160 is a 160. Even an identical rotor set and wheels will likely require some brake adjustment when swapping them out. Going with the same rotors on the second set will be one less variable.

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  7. #7
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    I'd put a spacer in the caliper and let it be. That being said, you can usually get away with using different brand rotors/calipers.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nietz View Post
    so is the consensus that if possible get the same rotors that are on the first set of wheels but using any rotor should work?

    Thanks for the replies so far guys.
    Exactly. You may have to shim one of the rotors to get them to line up the same. Even though the specs for that are pretty exact it still varies by tenths of a millimeter and it's enough to make the brake rub.

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