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  1. #1
    11 is one louder than 10
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    Disc Brake quiet, magical copper goop?

    What is this stuff I keep reading about. Does it work, where do I get me some?

    Everybody wants some... I want some too. - DLR

  2. #2
    mmm, carbon
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    Copper grease, also useful for greasing certain kinds of threads. The idea is the grease part boils/dries off and leaves a copper residue which prevents interference between two metals. It's a godsend on bottom brackets and pedals. With respect to disc brakes, a little copper grease on the back of the pads can often help with noisy disc brakes by preventing the pads sticking in the caliper and inducing vibration. Normal grease will work for a while, but will eventually just boil off. This won't always work either. I've had disc brakes where it's the actual pad to rotor interface that vibrates, and nothing short of a different pad compound provides an adequate fix. HTH.

    EDIT: oh and any half decent bike shop should have some... If not try an auto store.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timbo
    Copper grease, also useful for greasing certain kinds of threads. The idea is the grease part boils/dries off and leaves a copper residue which prevents interference between two metals. It's a godsend on bottom brackets and pedals. With respect to disc brakes, a little copper grease on the back of the pads can often help with noisy disc brakes by preventing the pads sticking in the caliper and inducing vibration. Normal grease will work for a while, but will eventually just boil off. This won't always work either. I've had disc brakes where it's the actual pad to rotor interface that vibrates, and nothing short of a different pad compound provides an adequate fix. HTH.

    EDIT: oh and any half decent bike shop should have some... If not try an auto store.

    When it comes to Automotive disc brakes there is almost always some sort of medium between the pad backing and caliper piston. In days gone by the most used compound was glue based ( I have even seen silicone used) - the idea was to affix the pad to the piston. Now it is common to find insulated steel shims. Silicone based grease does as the previous post mentioned. I have never had to experiment cause my Avid's are quiet stoppers.

  4. #4
    Shamisen Appreciator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timbo
    Copper grease, also useful for greasing certain kinds of threads. The idea is the grease part boils/dries off and leaves a copper residue which prevents interference between two metals.
    I had very high hopes and tried this a few nights ago on my Hope M4's. It didn't work. Unfortunately, my friends will be able to continue to complain about the horrible screech.
    Sean Chaney :: Owner/Builder :: Vertigo Cycles LLC
    flickr :: www.vertigocycles.com

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