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  1. #1
    Clydesdale
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! Disc Brake Pad Compounds

    I was looking all over hell and back for this kind of information and figured if I was looking for it someone else might also be interested. Very simple and straight forward, hope it helps!

    DISC BRAKE PAD COMPOUNDS

    Many disc brake pads are available in different compounds

    Medium Compound

    Also known as Compound S (Medium)

    Containing metal and graphite for long wear. Great for muddy conditions, and a good choice in all conditions. A medium compound with consistent wet performance and good grip.

    Advantages: Cheap, Above average all around performance
    Disadvantages: Grippier and longer lasting pads are available
    Suitable For: Everything
    Conclusion: Best Value

    Superlight WorldCup Competition Alu Backed Pads use the medium compound.

    Professional Grade Black Ceramic Compound

    Also known as Compound C (Ceramic Pro)

    These soft organic ceramic fiber disc brake pads are carbonized. The ceramic compound insulates the brake system from friction heat up to 400oC. The result is a very powerful, quiet pad with extremely low heat generation which all but eliminates the chances of brake fade.

    Details
    Upgrade on original fitted pads
    DIN 79100 Standard Approved
    Organic Compound contains no metal material
    Reduces damage to rotor
    Carbonized compound reduces brake fading
    Ceramic Fiber insulates brake system from friction heat
    Non-Asbestos



    Advantages: Excellent grip, Low noise, Low heat, Consistent in all conditions
    Disadvantages: Short life span unless rider is light on brakes
    Suitable For: DH, Dry XC, Ti Rotors
    Conclusion: Best Performance, Short Life

    Metallic Sintered

    Also known as Compound T (Sintered)


    Superior power in all conditions

    Long wear pads, great for DH or XC
    Consistent braking power in the wet
    Almost unaffected by rain and snow


    Advantages: Better performing and longer lasting than most pads
    Disadvantages: More expensive than medium pads
    Suitable For: XC, DH (low brake use), All weather conditions, Mud
    Conclusion: Best All Rounders

    Red Ceramic Compound - Hard

    Also known as Compound D (Ceramic Hard)

    Harder than ordinary pads. This is the highest density, hardest, ceramic compound for ultimate performance and the longer lifetime. These organic disc brake pads contain a high amount of ceramic fiber, which insulate the brake system from friction heat up to 400oC.

    Advantages: Better performing and longer lasting than medium pads

    Details
    Upgrade on original fitted pads
    DIN 79100 Standard Approved
    Organic Compound contains no metal material
    Reduces damage to rotor
    Carbonized compound reduces brake fading
    Ceramic Fiber insulates brake system from friction heat
    Non-Asbestos



    Advantages: Longer lasting than Black Ceramic pads
    Disadvantages: More expensive than Black Ceramic pads and not as grippy
    Suitable For: XC, DH (low brake use)
    Conclusion: Ceramic Advantages with Longer Life

    Other Factors

    Low Noise: The black ceramic compound C is thought to be virtually silent

    DH: Black Ceramic pads are great for Downhill as the ceramic compound insulates the calliper pistons from heat build up so reducing the likelihood of brake fade.

    Rotors: All of these compounds can be used with any rotor. Ceramic pads cause less damage to rotors than metallic compound pads. Titanium Rotors: We recommend black ceramic compound for titanium coated rotors, as it contains no metal, so will reduce damage to the rotor. The coating on titanium plated rotors is extremely thin (often just a few microns), so will ultimately wear off no matter what pad you use, but ceramic pads will prolong their life over pads containing metal.
    CLYDESDALE- when size matters!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    nice, thanks for the up. been looking for this information.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcote258
    nice, thanks for the up. been looking for this information.
    +1 this seems like info that sould be sticky'd in the brake forum.
    Big help
    Thanks

  4. #4
    Afric Pepperbird
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    Thanks!

    Some people swear by organic pads; I cannot live without sintered pads.

  5. #5
    Purulento
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    I have some shimano rotors (RT53), and they have a warning: "resin pads only". Which ones of the above I could use?

  6. #6
    I always bleed like this.
    Reputation: PoorBehavior's Avatar
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    FYI, this info is from DiscoBrakes website and specifically applies to their brakes and their compounds. Though I doubt there is much difference I am sure some companies use different compounds that do not have the same specifications as disko brakes.

    Good info, just wanted to add the caveat.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Purulento View Post
    I have some shimano rotors (RT53), and they have a warning: "resin pads only". Which ones of the above I could use?
    "some discs are unhardened and therfore only suitable for use with softer organic formulations. If your disc is marked 'Resin pads only' then you should opt for RWD Organic disc brake pads. This will safeguard from scoring and premature wear of the disc when coupled with a harder or sintered brake pad." - Race Winning Designs Disc Brake Pads | RWD HIGH PERFORMANCE braking products for the cycling industry specialising in Disc Brake Pads and Racing Brake Fluid.
    "if only you try to do - then do you fail because you only tried" ZH01 (3rd PD)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorBehavior View Post
    FYI, this info is from DiscoBrakes website and specifically applies to their brakes and their compounds. Though I doubt there is much difference I am sure some companies use different compounds that do not have the same specifications as disko brakes.

    Good info, just wanted to add the caveat.
    Exactly. The OP just describes the product line of one supplier and is not information about brake pads in general.

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