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  1. #51
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    Haha, will try this next time I'm taking out my wheels. Rear brake squeaking like hell.

  2. #52
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    Align the rotor closer to the fixed pad if you're on mech brakes.

  3. #53
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    And then there are some brakes (the Hayes hydros I'm running) that you can machine the rotors and pad faces as much as you want - to no avail... screeching problem like no other brakes I've seen. Aligned, misaligned, cleaned, lubed, whatever... it's all the same result with those things so far.

  4. #54
    Weird huh?
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    Worked very well on my brakes. Brilliant and simple. (I used neon yellow zip ties) ***** 5 chiles out of 5
    And don't do the burrito jump... Francois

  5. #55
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    I generally have to swap for new pads when I get bad squeal.

  6. #56
    the half breed devil
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    my avid elixirs have howled like coyotes from twenty miles after i rode the bike out of the shop.

    a good cleaning with alcohol usually helps but it seems as if the very slightest contamination sets them to the howling again.

  7. #57
    Carbon or Commie?
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    WD40 ALWAYS cures my brake squeal.

    It also cures me of the pesky ability to slow down. But it's quiet as can be (except for my screaming as I go over the cliff).

  8. #58
    more carbon=more awesome
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    How much do you reckon loose or uneven spoke tension would contribute to squeeling brakes? The way I figure it, a wheel flexing during braking would exacerbate any resonant frequency issues.
    Posting on the basis that ignorance shared is ignorance doubled.

  9. #59
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    The OP's zip tie idea worked great, I did this yesterday with my xtr rear brake that has been giving me fits and this quieted them down nicely.

  10. #60
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    I have squabble issues with my hayes ST & magura storm disc setup that i'm currently testing various options to eliminate it, that said i've read a few threads like this one to see what people experiment with, what works, what doesn't all in an effort to cure the painful sounds.
    What i have come across numerous times are people using sandpaper, emery cloth and the like on used pads in order to give a clean surface which to bed in on their next attempt........sandpaper/emery cloth contain adhesives in the mauf process therefor it can easily transfer to the pad then disc all for not. An alternative to this is using a medium or smooth cut flat file layed flat and place the pad/s on them and pull or push the pad with moderate pressure in one direction, rinse repeat 2-3 times clean the file and repeat again if necessary. This simple easy step removes the sandpaper adhesive aspect from the equation.

  11. #61
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    Interesting concept.

    I'm still breaking in my hydraulic discs on my new bike (first time with discs).

    I don't understand why the rear would squeal more than the front. What sizes are we talking about? Mine are 160mm rear and 180mm front. All Shimano except the front rotor is Avid HSX.

    Brakes have always been my utmost concern. Previously I suffered with rim brakes and the front was always horrible. Now I'm on a completely new bike with completely new types of components.

    Hopefully no problems, but this is a good idea.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by EUREMA View Post
    finally saw this post and tried your "zip tie mod" and works great! thanks a lot for this amazing tip!
    I've done proper burnishing of pads to no avail, tried yet a 2nd set with proper bedding in but sadly no better.....UNTIL the zip-tie mod on magura storm SL discs, i installed 3 smallish ties spanning 2 spokes each on the front and the instant reduction in warbble / squeal was significant to the point i can accept what little remains. I also installed 1 zip on the rear spanning 3 spokes and it too was instantaneous as though a damper of sorts was added (actually was).
    Overall my feeling about this is perhaps the magura disc spokes are too thin width wise in their effort to shave weight, hhmm maybe, maybe not but perhaps an mech engineer can expound on such if there's one here.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by nvphatty View Post
    I have squabble issues with my hayes ST & magura storm disc setup that i'm currently testing various options to eliminate it, that said i've read a few threads like this one to see what people experiment with, what works, what doesn't all in an effort to cure the painful sounds.
    What i have come across numerous times are people using sandpaper, emery cloth and the like on used pads in order to give a clean surface which to bed in on their next attempt........sandpaper/emery cloth contain adhesives in the mauf process therefor it can easily transfer to the pad then disc all for not. An alternative to this is using a medium or smooth cut flat file layed flat and place the pad/s on them and pull or push the pad with moderate pressure in one direction, rinse repeat 2-3 times clean the file and repeat again if necessary. This simple easy step removes the sandpaper adhesive aspect from the equation.
    BINGO! you got it! I read thru 3 pages here to see if anyone knew about the filing of the pads and you are the only one that got it with the file thing other that it's the edges of the pads,I file the edges at an angle,I worked at a shop for a while and I worked on all kinds of bikes but I could not get my Avid 5s to stop squeaking I called another mechanic and did the file thing and then went out and beded them in doing it only a few times. It even worked on my SS with cheep Hayes cable pull disc. I have never tryed the sandpaper but the file I use is fine it's a small one about 5" long 1/2" wide.

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by idinomac View Post
    BINGO! you got it! I read thru 3 pages here to see if anyone knew about the filing of the pads and you are the only one that got it with the file thing other that it's the edges of the pads,I file the edges at an angle,I worked at a shop for a while and I worked on all kinds of bikes but I could not get my Avid 5s to stop squeaking I called another mechanic and did the file thing and then went out and bedded them in doing it only a few times. It even worked on my SS with cheep Hayes cable pull disc. I have never tried the sandpaper but the file I use is fine it's a small one about 5" long 1/2" wide.
    glad to be of any help I can. I also chamfer the leading edge I just didn't mention it.

  15. #65
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    the zip ties are a cool idea

  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlooneyone View Post
    the zip ties are a cool idea
    certainly not aesthetically pleasing but given their use quite functional.

  17. #67
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    ... there doesn't seem to be any magic formula for stopping brake squeals, there are so many variables that can bring it on... the biggest factors have got to be the rotors, the pads (compounds/condition/construction/design)... I like to wipe my rotors down with a bike wash solution from time to time which seems to help some, my zip ties are still in place... if you encounter a bad squeaker it may be time to try a softer compound pad

  18. #68
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    Unreal. I read this post at work this afternoon. I just got home and slapped one zip tie on the front rotor and one on the rear. It was instant.....zero brake chirp. It has to be the thickness of the rotor. Thanks for the great tip.

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