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  1. #1
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    Conveting from V-Brakes to Disk Brakes...need help/advice!

    Alrighty so I'm wanting to go from v to disc brakes but I have no idea really what I'm looking at (other than a lot of high prices!). I do know that I'm going to have to get new wheels also, so the setup I was kinda looking at was Mavic Crossride UB 2011 wheelset and Avid BB7 brakes. Now that was really just based off of prices I saw on price point, so I have no real reason for picking those wheels, however I have gotten a lot of recommendation for the BB7 brakes. This is only going to be used for recreational trail riding so no need for the best or most expensive.

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    BB7 are a good choice.

    Wheels. I would look for wheels with Shimano Deore hubs M525 (these hubs cost only a little more than the M475 series hubs but smoother) you can find these laced to various rims Alex, WTB, Mavic etc etc. I like these because the wheels use normal spokes for easy repairs.

    Shimano hubs come in two types 6 bolt and centre lock C/L. Make sure you buy the ones you want. Avid rotors are 6 bolt.

    It might be cheaper to find a second hand bike with the parts you need than buying new parts. Since you only want the brakes/wheels bike size is not important.
    Last edited by mitzikatzi; 05-18-2012 at 07:55 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    It might be cheaper to find a second hand bike with the parts you need than buying new parts. Since you only want the brakes/wheels bike size is not important.
    I like this idea, I also am considering convering to disc brakes, but did not want to pay as much as it would cost to just buy a whole bike for the conversion... looks like some time on craigslist and like sites are in my future.

    Thanks for that great suggestion.

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    craigslist is a good source if you're trying to keep cost down. a wheelset can be as cheap as like 50 bucks - just be careful you know what you're getting

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    HAHAHA, yea, I usually am.... that where I got my bike from, knew from the start it had a few small issues, fixed those and been good since. But once again, good advice, vk45de, know what you are getting into.

  6. #6
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    New question here.

    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonCJ14 View Post
    Alrighty so I'm wanting to go from v to disc brakes but I have no idea really what I'm looking at (other than a lot of high prices!). I do know that I'm going to have to get new wheels also, so the setup I was kinda looking at was Mavic Crossride UB 2011 wheelset and Avid BB7 brakes. Now that was really just based off of prices I saw on price point, so I have no real reason for picking those wheels, however I have gotten a lot of recommendation for the BB7 brakes. This is only going to be used for recreational trail riding so no need for the best or most expensive.
    and your bike already has the disc brake caliber mounts on the front and rear? (just making sure)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLMike View Post
    and your bike already has the disc brake caliber mounts on the front and rear? (just making sure)
    Yes it does. Which I found interested because when I got into (and out of) biking back when I was in middle school/early high school (i'm a senior in college now), disc brakes were something that only serious racers had. Now that I'm starting back, it seems like even the little cheap run-of-the-mill bikes are coming with them. I feel like I'm riding an antique!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonCJ14 View Post
    Yes it does. Which I found interested because when I got into (and out of) biking back when I was in middle school/early high school (i'm a senior in college now), disc brakes were something that only serious racers had. Now that I'm starting back, it seems like even the little cheap run-of-the-mill bikes are coming with them. I feel like I'm riding an antique!
    There are some "horrible" low end disc brakes around. Good quality V brakes, pads and cables would be better.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    There are some "horrible" low end disc brakes around. Good quality V brakes, pads and cables would be better.
    Well I think I've decided the BB7 is the route I'm gonna go. Now I just gotta figure out what wheels I'm going to go with. I think I've decided though that centerlock isn't something I wanna deal with. 6-bolt seems to be the more hassle-free way to go.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonCJ14 View Post
    Well I think I've decided the BB7 is the route I'm gonna go. Now I just gotta figure out what wheels I'm going to go with. I think I've decided though that centerlock isn't something I wanna deal with. 6-bolt seems to be the more hassle-free way to go.
    Wheels are one part that is easy to swap to a new bike. Don't go too cheap. Cheap wheels can be very heavy.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    Wheels are one part that is easy to swap to a new bike. Don't go too cheap. Cheap wheels can be very heavy.
    What is "heavy" though? I have no reference...everything I'm looking at is 1900-2100 grams. Is that decent or what? I don't know what my current wheels would be, they're Deore LX wheels.

    What about these: Easton XC One SS Wheelset at Price Point

  12. #12
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    Those are single speed wheels.

    I like MTB wheels with 32 or 36 normal spokes (plain or butted).
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  14. #14
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    Closer to $300 (and out of stock) Mountain-Bike-Wheels/Shimano-XT-WTB-Laserdisc-Trail-Wheel

    or these but centre lock and 15mm front axle so no good for you I am guessing
    Mountain-Bike-Wheels/Shimano-XT-Centerlock-Mavic-717-Oe cheap at $190. Just to show you there are lots of bargains if you look hard enough.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    Closer to $300 (and out of stock) Mountain-Bike-Wheels/Shimano-XT-WTB-Laserdisc-Trail-Wheel

    or these but centre lock and 15mm front axle so no good for you I am guessing
    Mountain-Bike-Wheels/Shimano-XT-Centerlock-Mavic-717-Oe cheap at $190. Just to show you there are lots of bargains if you look hard enough.
    So what mm do I need to be looking at? I was wondering that also.
    2001 Raleigh M80 Mountain Sport
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonCJ14 View Post
    So what mm do I need to be looking at? I was wondering that also.
    Thru-axle-explanation-needed Thanks Google
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    Ok so I have old LX wheels with the old school quick release skewers...so what size wheels would I have front and back? I'm guessing 9mm front but the rear is still confusing me.
    2001 Raleigh M80 Mountain Sport
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonCJ14 View Post
    Ok so I have old LX wheels with the old school quick release skewers...so what size wheels would I have front and back? I'm guessing 9mm front but the rear is still confusing me.
    Front QR 100mm axle spacing
    Rear QR 135mm
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    I don't see where anyone has asked what bike frame and front shock (if applicable) you have. I know you say that you have the mounts but if it's an older mt bike (i.e., pre-'06) I don't think disc makes sense. Even if your front shock has the proper mounts, it is likely that it will not be up for the task and will flex a lot under hard braking. By the time you cost out the new wheels, rotors, brakes, adapters, and install you have exceeded the value of the bike. Make more sense to get a good used bike with disc setup. Just my 2 cents.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jetta2010 View Post
    I don't see where anyone has asked what bike frame and front shock (if applicable) you have. I know you say that you have the mounts but if it's an older mt bike (i.e., pre-'06) I don't think disc makes sense. Even if your front shock has the proper mounts, it is likely that it will not be up for the task and will flex a lot under hard braking. By the time you cost out the new wheels, rotors, brakes, adapters, and install you have exceeded the value of the bike. Make more sense to get a good used bike with disc setup. Just my 2 cents.
    The bike is a 2001 Raleigh M80 but I just ordered a Manitou Minute Expert today. I know it's going to be a slightly expensive upgrade but the bike has a lot of sentimental value to it so I wanna keep it running well. So as long as the parts are out there I don't mind spending a little extra to keep it running.
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  21. #21
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    I did the same thing with an old friend. Installed new shock with disc mounts, used Avid bb7's (awsome) with Jaguar cables (a very inportant detail with mechanical disc) and a Mavic Cross Ride wheel. I kept the cost down by only doing the front and utilized v-brakes in the rear (after all we use 70-80% front brake ) works great. Remember GOOD cables. Good place to seek help from would be lbs

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by redd4573 View Post
    I did the same thing with an old friend. Installed new shock with disc mounts, used Avid bb7's (awsome) with Jaguar cables (a very inportant detail with mechanical disc) and a Mavic Cross Ride wheel. I kept the cost down by only doing the front and utilized v-brakes in the rear (after all we use 70-80% front brake ) works great. Remember GOOD cables. Good place to seek help from would be lbs
    How's he liking those wheels?
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  23. #23
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    My old freind is an old Trek 7000 and WE like em.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by redd4573 View Post
    My old freind is an old Trek 7000 and WE like em.
    Oh haha I thought you just HELPED an old friend the same thing...
    2001 Raleigh M80 Mountain Sport
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    Quote Originally Posted by redd4573 View Post
    I did the same thing with an old friend. Installed new shock with disc mounts, used Avid bb7's (awsome) with Jaguar cables (a very inportant detail with mechanical disc) and a Mavic Cross Ride wheel. I kept the cost down by only doing the front and utilized v-brakes in the rear (after all we use 70-80% front brake ) works great. Remember GOOD cables. Good place to seek help from would be lbs
    Now there is an idea, only do the front setup for disc... Something else for me to consider.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by bandit1 View Post
    Now there is an idea, only do the front setup for disc... Something else for me to consider.
    Why is this a good idea? My rear brake is the one that has all the issues...
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  27. #27
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    Sorry, but cost was a cosideration and just doing the front would allow people to save money. and beside it does work great unless running DH alot with big wheels and tires then that would be different story

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    so for my useage, this could be an option...

    If your rear brake has the issues, then you can start off with just the rear disc and when cost allows do the front.

    Like redd4573 said, given cost, doing one at a time will seem less painless in the long run even though cost will be the same either way, you just dont see it all at once.

  29. #29
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    Hey Clemson, Give some details what you wieght, type of bike, type of riding?

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    Quote Originally Posted by redd4573 View Post
    Hey Clemson, Give some details what you wieght, type of bike, type of riding?
    150lbs (hopefully the more I ride it'll get a little closer to 140...I'm kinda short), the bike is a 2001 Raleigh M80 hardtail, and riding is pretty much all XC.
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  31. #31
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    I'll tell you that I am 200lbs on a hard tail and run the BB7, 160mm rotor, and metalic pads, biggest things are adjustment, keeping rotors & pads clean, and you break in the rotors good. And they will work great.

  32. #32
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    Sorry did not see your post about rear brake problems. What sort of problems?

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    Quote Originally Posted by redd4573 View Post
    Sorry did not see your post about rear brake problems. What sort of problems?
    I don't really know I just can't get it to quit squealing no matter what I do, even new pads and they still do it. Guys at the shop say only thing they can think of logically would be the wheels...so if I'm gonna do that, may as well get disc wheels.
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonCJ14 View Post
    I don't really know I just can't get it to quit squealing no matter what I do, even new pads and they still do it. Guys at the shop say only thing they can think of logically would be the wheels...so if I'm gonna do that, may as well get disc wheels.
    I've never had a V brake or canti brake squeal that I couldn't fix. Disc squealing is definitely a more difficult problem. I can't imagine that the wheels are to blame.

    I'm thinking that bike shop guys these days are too young to know how to fiddle with V brakes

    You've adjusted "toe in" I assume?

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve View Post
    I've never had a V brake or canti brake squeal that I couldn't fix. Disc squealing is definitely a more difficult problem. I can't imagine that the wheels are to blame.

    I'm thinking that bike shop guys these days are too young to know how to fiddle with V brakes

    You've adjusted "toe in" I assume?
    Not really sure what that means...
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonCJ14 View Post
    Not really sure what that means...
    It means that the pads should be adjusted to a slight angle so that when you apply the brakes, the front of the pad (forward part) contacts the rim first. The back end of the pad should have about an eigth inch gap to the rim when the front first makes contact, and close in as more pressure is applied.

    Another thing to try:
    Many V brake pads are asymetrical, meaning the post is not coming out of the center. There is a long side and a short side. You could experiment with having the long end forward or short end forward. I have found that having the long end forward allows easier and better toe-in adjustment and probably better for fixing a squeal problem. BUT, you can't do this with cartridge type pads or the force of the rim will pull the pad right out of the cartridge if it is installed backwards. You can do it if you have the standard type pad where the post is embedded directly into the rubber pad.

    The problem with long end forward on the rear is that the pads may hit the seat stays when you try to open your calipers all the way to remove the wheel. This could be a problem with wide tires, but normally you only remove your wheel when you have flat so its not that big of a deal. You just have to try it.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve View Post
    It means that the pads should be adjusted to a slight angle so that when you apply the brakes, the front of the pad (forward part) contacts the rim first. The back end of the pad should have about an eigth inch gap to the rim when the front first makes contact, and close in as more pressure is applied.

    Another thing to try:
    Many V brake pads are asymetrical, meaning the post is not coming out of the center. There is a long side and a short side. You could experiment with having the long end forward or short end forward. I have found that having the long end forward allows easier and better toe-in adjustment and probably better for fixing a squeal problem. BUT, you can't do this with cartridge type pads or the force of the rim will pull the pad right out of the cartridge if it is installed backwards. You can do it if you have the standard type pad where the post is embedded directly into the rubber pad.

    The problem with long end forward on the rear is that the pads may hit the seat stays when you try to open your calipers all the way to remove the wheel. This could be a problem with wide tires, but normally you only remove your wheel when you have flat so its not that big of a deal. You just have to try it.
    Thanks for the info.
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    Clemson, Has there been anything new concerning the rear brakes, repairs, new pads, wheel retrued, anything like that. When did it start and what were the circumstances?

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    Quote Originally Posted by redd4573 View Post
    Clemson, Has there been anything new concerning the rear brakes, repairs, new pads, wheel retrued, anything like that. When did it start and what were the circumstances?
    It started as soon as I got on the bike after not touching it for about a year lol. Other than that, nothing new for a long time!
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    Ok a few more questions, You said the bike was a 2001. Have the brake pads been changed, if so when? Has the wheel been retrued or does it need to be retrued? Are all the nuts and bolts tight? And is there alot of play between brakearm and post?

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    Quote Originally Posted by redd4573 View Post
    Ok a few more questions, You said the bike was a 2001. Have the brake pads been changed, if so when? Has the wheel been retrued or does it need to be retrued? Are all the nuts and bolts tight? And is there alot of play between brakearm and post?
    They were changed when I got the new LX brakes several years back. Now while that sounds like a long time, it's only been ridden about a hard months worth in that amount of time. The wheel hasn't been and doesn't need to be trued. And everything seems to be pretty tight and no play...so yeah it's getting kinda weird. But I reverse the pads to see if that helps but my bike is unrideable right now so it may be a while before I can test it out :/
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    Clemson, you said

    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonCJ14 View Post
    I don't really know I just can't get it to quit squealing no matter what I do, even new pads and they still do it.
    Then you said
    They were changed when I got the new LX brakes several years back.
    So, pads that are several years old are not new pads, even if they are barely used. Rubber oxidizes, gets, old, brittle, cracks, gets stiff, hard, smooth, etc.

    If you want to get your brakes working, get some new pads. If you want disc brakes buy disc brakes. My advice about toe-in etc is all good, but up until now we all were going by the information you gave us that you had new pads.

    Pads are cheap. You have squealing that even the bike shop can't fix? But the bike shop never thought of trying new pads?

    ??????

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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve View Post
    Clemson, you said



    Then you said


    So, pads that are several years old are not new pads, even if they are barely used. Rubber oxidizes, gets, old, brittle, cracks, gets stiff, hard, smooth, etc.

    If you want to get your brakes working, get some new pads. If you want disc brakes buy disc brakes. My advice about toe-in etc is all good, but up until now we all were going by the information you gave us that you had new pads.

    Pads are cheap. You have squealing that even the bike shop can't fix? But the bike shop never thought of trying new pads?

    ??????
    Well guess they just saw pads with virtually no wear...I work vehicles a lot and if I had one with brakes squealing but the pads looked brand new, that wouldn't really be where I'd look for the problem.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonCJ14 View Post
    Well guess they just saw pads with virtually no wear...I work vehicles a lot and if I had one with brakes squealing but the pads looked brand new, that wouldn't really be where I'd look for the problem.
    True but vehicles and even disc bicycle pads are a totally different story. V brake pads are rubber, and rubber gets old, hard, and brittle from oxidation.

    I tried to revive some old Onza cantilevers I had laying around last summer. The original pads were still on them and looked good. They didn't squeal, but they would not stop the bike at all! they had totally lost all grip. So changing pads might stop your squealing problem, and would probably improve your brake power as well.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve View Post
    True but vehicles and even disc bicycle pads are a totally different story. V brake pads are rubber, and rubber gets old, hard, and brittle from oxidation.

    I tried to revive some old Onza cantilevers I had laying around last summer. The original pads were still on them and looked good. They didn't squeal, but they would not stop the bike at all! they had totally lost all grip. So changing pads might stop your squealing problem, and would probably improve your brake power as well.
    Yeah I'll probably grab a set of pads today and see if they fix it. I ordered a new fork last night so the bike should be up and running in a week.
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve View Post
    True but vehicles and even disc bicycle pads are a totally different story. V brake pads are rubber, and rubber gets old, hard, and brittle from oxidation.

    I tried to revive some old Onza cantilevers I had laying around last summer. The original pads were still on them and looked good. They didn't squeal, but they would not stop the bike at all! they had totally lost all grip. So changing pads might stop your squealing problem, and would probably improve your brake power as well.
    This might help explain why my bike has a long stopping distance even when front and rear are applied at the same time as hard as I can grip the leaver. I will have to get me some new pads as well and see if that helps my stopping power and distance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by redd4573 View Post
    I did the same thing with an old friend. Installed new shock with disc mounts, used Avid bb7's (awsome) with Jaguar cables (a very inportant detail with mechanical disc) and a Mavic Cross Ride wheel. I kept the cost down by only doing the front and utilized v-brakes in the rear (after all we use 70-80% front brake ) works great. Remember GOOD cables. Good place to seek help from would be lbs
    How do you know if they're "good" cables or not?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonCJ14 View Post
    How do you know if they're "good" cables or not?
    Nicer cables have teflon lined housing and nice rubber boots to seal the housing ends. Some people say its better to run full length housing, but I;m not sure I agree. You also have to make sure you don't have too much housing, yet also don't have sharp bends that cause friction. Some cables are teflon coated as well.
    It's worth it to buy a decent cable set from Jagwire or similar, instead of trying to reuse old stuff or buy generic. Making the system as frictionless as possible will have a noticeable effect on performance.

  49. #49
    Heavylegs
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    Couldn't agree more with Smilinsteve. Cables are very over looked, and you need to run good ones regardless of the brakes being used

  50. #50
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve View Post
    True but vehicles and even disc bicycle pads are a totally different story. V brake pads are rubber, and rubber gets old, hard, and brittle from oxidation.

    I tried to revive some old Onza cantilevers I had laying around last summer. The original pads were still on them and looked good. They didn't squeal, but they would not stop the bike at all! they had totally lost all grip. So changing pads might stop your squealing problem, and would probably improve your brake power as well.
    Got the bike back after having the new fork and headset installed and the new pads worked like a charm. They're cheap $4 Jagwire pads but they seem to work great.
    2001 Raleigh M80 Mountain Sport
    - Manitou Minute Expert fork
    - LX/XT components

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