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  1. #1
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! Contaminated Brake Pads - How I fixed it, Home Cooking Cure.

    I 've recently changed my Dual XT disc brakes and shifters in my LBS.
    Unfortunately something was wrong with the bleeding procedure, the brake pads were left on the calipers, whitch resulted in contamination of the brake pads and discs. I left the shop with hardly any rear and only minor front braking power and the horrible squicking noise.
    I thought I should google things and see if I can find a solution myself.
    I read a lot of interesting and debating threads on the subject and desided to try a few tricks and see if there can be a cure, or should I just dispose the damn things and go for new brake pads and probably rotors?
    The last option is highly recommented to anyone who wants to stay on the safe side of things.
    I took my chances as follows:

    DAY1:
    First thing, I thought. ,I should deep clean everything up.
    I boiled a cup of water, added dish and cloth washing soaps and droped the pads in there for about an hour.
    I also cleaned the disks with with soap, dried them and cleaned them again with alcohol.
    I washed the water off the pads, then used alcohol here again.
    When finished cleaning I put the brake pads in a small metal dish, covered them with alcohol and fired it up .
    It all burned out, leaving the pad surface clean from marks and shine.
    Then I filed the pads a little bit with a metal tool.
    Next day I tried to bed the pads in with some water spiled on them , braking with soft and hard intervals. Things got a bit better at the rear and much better at the front, which was not so bad to start with. Still I wasn't satisfied, as I need all my braging power at the tip of my finger which took me to another try:

    DAY2
    I took the rear pads off again and dip them in a small container covered "White Spirit", a common oil paint thinner. I left them in there overnight.
    In the morning I took the pads in the metal dish with some of the thinner, added some alcohol and burned out everything.
    I cleaned them with alcohol and then came cooking time .
    I placed the pads with the dish in the oven at 200 degrees C, fun on, for half an hour.
    Again pad alcohol clean up, file rubbing, then disc cleanup treatment first with thinner then alcohol.

    That did the job!!
    Braking power is back as usual, silent and grabby!!

    WARNING!

    As most reasonable people comment on the subject, this is not a safe or recommented way to deal with brake contamination. There are leathal dangers that need to be researched and considered before anyone tries this home cooking brake cake.
    I do not suggest it, I just informe anyone that might be interested that it has worked out for me.
    The suggested way to deal with brake contamination is to go for brand new pads and perhaps disc rotors.

    Happy Trails everyone!!
    Last edited by manokaiser; 04-10-2011 at 01:59 PM. Reason: spelling

  2. #2
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    Did the same thing last night, Noob here shortened my hoses and rebled. Got brake fluid all over my rotor and pads.
    I probably looked funny, but I ended up sitting the wheel on the tread mill and running it while dragging the brake and hitting with windex. Brakes work great now lol

  3. #3
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    Yup, alot of us don't have 20 min downhills to heat up and burn contaminants off. I use an old toaster oven to cook mine. All my disk brakes are contaminated over the winter due to shop chemicals in the air. I've got 5 sets on my 7 bikes to deal with. By spring, all need attention. I do worry a little about the adhesive being compromised by excessive heat from cooking. I cook at 400F for 1 hour.

  4. #4
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    Or...
    hit an auto parts store and buy brake cleaner.
    Done.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by the mayor
    Or...
    hit an auto parts store and buy brake cleaner.
    Done.
    I've tried that...worked on my motorcycles but never on my bikes unless I heat them up once before counting on them. It seems the porosity of the pads soak up crap, not sure if thats why brake cleaner doesn't work for me. Cooking has always worked for me.

    If course if I rode fast enough to really need my brakes more than a few times I could actually keep them clean...

  6. #6
    Purulento
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    I have access to a Bunsen Burner or a Dremel torch. Would it work if I heat up the pads like one does with test tubes(circulating them around the flames)?

  7. #7
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    White spirit shouldn't be used on brakes it leaves a oilly residue you want Methelated Spirits.

    I hold mine with pliers and burn the contamination out with my gas hob don't over do it and flush with cold water and re do it a few times.

    Only works with Sintered pads though, organics will just grumble.

    correct, cleaner will only work on the surface, oil or whatever soaks in so you need high temperature to burn it out.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1niceride
    Yup, alot of us don't have 20 min downhills to heat up and burn contaminants off. I use an old toaster oven to cook mine. All my disk brakes are contaminated over the winter due to shop chemicals in the air. I've got 5 sets on my 7 bikes to deal with. By spring, all need attention. I do worry a little about the adhesive being compromised by excessive heat from cooking. I cook at 400F for 1 hour.
    I have 2 pairs that are contaminated. Do they smoke or smell bad when heating them up? Would my wife kill me if i do it in my oven or is it not advisable?
    I ride a bike, therefore I am!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwantalitebike
    I have 2 pairs that are contaminated. Do they smoke or smell bad when heating them up? Would my wife kill me if i do it in my oven or is it not advisable?
    Just throw in some bacon and let it spladder all over when the pads are done. Send the wife out first...

    I think that the amount of gasses released is porportional to the amount of oil absorbed by the pad. At least make a tin foil tray for this use...

  10. #10
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    I actually had success with Goof Off. Thinners were a disaster.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by the mayor
    Or...
    hit an auto parts store and buy brake cleaner.
    Done.

    NoNo,
    That's a BIG NoNo!
    A lot of that staff went on my pads at the instalation in the bike shop.
    I did nothing to the clean the pads, it just made things even worst.
    Brake Cleaner is NOT for the pads nor the discs, particularly the car staff. Pads should be removed before anything touches them.
    Cleaner has never worked on my bike, it's for lazy mechanics

  12. #12
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by Turveyd
    White spirit shouldn't be used on brakes it leaves a oilly residue you want Methelated Spirits.

    I hold mine with pliers and burn the contamination out with my gas hob don't over do it and flush with cold water and re do it a few times.

    Only works with Sintered pads though, organics will just grumble.

    correct, cleaner will only work on the surface, oil or whatever soaks in so you need high temperature to burn it out.
    True!
    There was an oily residue indeed, that's why I mixed with alcohol and burned it all on it's own flame before I put the pads in the oven.
    The pads were XTR Ti Resin.

  13. #13
    nocturnal oblivion
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    Take a propane torch to them, when they stop flaming and are red hot they're done. Worked for me and takes two minutes.
    "...like sex with the trail." - Boe

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by manokaiser
    I 've recently changed my Dual XT disc brakes and shifters in my LBS.
    Unfortunately something was wrong with the bleeding procedure, the brake pads were left on the calipers, whitch resulted in contamination of the brake pads and discs. I left the shop with hardly any rear and only minor front braking power and the horrible squicking noise.
    I thought I should google things and see if I can find a solution myself.
    I read a lot of interesting and debating threads on the subject and desided to try a few tricks and see if there can be a cure, or should I just dispose the damn things and go for new brake pads and probably rotors?
    The last option is highly recommented to anyone who wants to stay on the safe side of things.
    I took my chances as follows:

    DAY1:
    First thing, I thought. ,I should deep clean everything up.
    I boiled a cup of water, added dish and cloth washing soaps and droped the pads in there for about an hour.
    I also cleaned the disks with with soap, dried them and cleaned them again with alcohol.
    I washed the water off the pads, then used alcohol here again.
    When finished cleaning I put the brake pads in a small metal dish, covered them with alcohol and fired it up .
    It all burned out, leaving the pad surface clean from marks and shine.
    Then I filed the pads a little bit with a metal tool.
    Next day I tried to bed the pads in with some water spiled on them , braking with soft and hard intervals. Things got a bit better at the rear and much better at the front, which was not so bad to start with. Still I wasn't satisfied, as I need all my braging power at the tip of my finger which took me to another try:

    DAY2
    I took the rear pads off again and dip them in a small container covered "White Spirit", a common oil paint thinner. I left them in there overnight.
    In the morning I took the pads in the metal dish with some of the thinner, added some alcohol and burned out everything.
    I cleaned them with alcohol and then came cooking time .
    I placed the pads with the dish in the oven at 200 degrees C, fun on, for half an hour.
    Again pad alcohol clean up, file rubbing, then disc cleanup treatment first with thinner then alcohol.

    That did the job!!
    Braking power is back as usual, silent and grabby!!

    WARNING!

    As most reasonable people comment on the subject, this is not a safe or recommented way to deal with brake contamination. There are leathal dangers that need to be researched and considered before anyone tries this home cooking brake cake.
    I do not suggest it, I just informe anyone that might be interested that it has worked out for me.
    The suggested way to deal with brake contamination is to go for brand new pads and perhaps disc rotors.

    Happy Trails everyone!!

    PUt them in an old fry pan at medium heat on the stove...takes about 15 mins to burn off the crap...lightly sand and re-install.....takes about an 40 mins with cool down time.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by manokaiser
    I 've recently changed my Dual XT disc brakes and shifters in my LBS.
    Unfortunately something was wrong with the bleeding procedure, the brake pads were left on the calipers, whitch resulted in contamination of the brake pads and discs. I left the shop with hardly any rear and only minor front braking power and the horrible squicking noise.
    I thought I should google things and see if I can find a solution myself.
    I read a lot of interesting and debating threads on the subject and desided to try a few tricks and see if there can be a cure, or should I just dispose the damn things and go for new brake pads and probably rotors?
    The last option is highly recommented to anyone who wants to stay on the safe side of things.
    I took my chances as follows:

    DAY1:
    First thing, I thought. ,I should deep clean everything up.
    I boiled a cup of water, added dish and cloth washing soaps and droped the pads in there for about an hour.
    I also cleaned the disks with with soap, dried them and cleaned them again with alcohol.
    I washed the water off the pads, then used alcohol here again.
    When finished cleaning I put the brake pads in a small metal dish, covered them with alcohol and fired it up .
    It all burned out, leaving the pad surface clean from marks and shine.
    Then I filed the pads a little bit with a metal tool.
    Next day I tried to bed the pads in with some water spiled on them , braking with soft and hard intervals. Things got a bit better at the rear and much better at the front, which was not so bad to start with. Still I wasn't satisfied, as I need all my braging power at the tip of my finger which took me to another try:

    DAY2
    I took the rear pads off again and dip them in a small container covered "White Spirit", a common oil paint thinner. I left them in there overnight.
    In the morning I took the pads in the metal dish with some of the thinner, added some alcohol and burned out everything.
    I cleaned them with alcohol and then came cooking time .
    I placed the pads with the dish in the oven at 200 degrees C, fun on, for half an hour.
    Again pad alcohol clean up, file rubbing, then disc cleanup treatment first with thinner then alcohol.

    That did the job!!
    Braking power is back as usual, silent and grabby!!

    WARNING!

    As most reasonable people comment on the subject, this is not a safe or recommented way to deal with brake contamination. There are leathal dangers that need to be researched and considered before anyone tries this home cooking brake cake.
    I do not suggest it, I just informe anyone that might be interested that it has worked out for me.
    The suggested way to deal with brake contamination is to go for brand new pads and perhaps disc rotors.

    Happy Trails everyone!!

    Wow, thats a lot of work. Whenever, I have squeaking pads. I just take them out, and lightly sand them with some 100 to 200 grit sandpaper. It hasn't failed me yet.

  16. #16
    ballbuster
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    Works for me!

    Quote Originally Posted by manokaiser
    NoNo,
    That's a BIG NoNo!
    A lot of that staff went on my pads at the instalation in the bike shop.
    I did nothing to the clean the pads, it just made things even worst.
    Brake Cleaner is NOT for the pads nor the discs, particularly the car staff. Pads should be removed before anything touches them.
    Cleaner has never worked on my bike, it's for lazy mechanics
    I just had a leaky hose puke shimano brake fluid all over my new XTR pads. Brake Kleen, cut as much of the brake fluid (mineral oil) as possible.

    Then, clamped the corner of the backplate in a vise in the garage, get a fire extinguisher queued up, eye protection, hit it with a propane torch until they stopped smoking. Let them cool, sand them down a tad, put them on and good as new.

    Saved me $30 and took me like 15 minutes to do the whole thing.

    The toaster oven method probably works just as well, and is safer to do. But I wouldn't ever use that toaster oven for cooking food ever again.
    Last edited by pimpbot; 04-12-2011 at 11:56 PM.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by manokaiser
    NoNo,
    That's a BIG NoNo!
    A lot of that staff went on my pads at the instalation in the bike shop.
    I did nothing to the clean the pads, it just made things even worst.
    Brake Cleaner is NOT for the pads nor the discs, particularly the car staff. Pads should be removed before anything touches them.
    Cleaner has never worked on my bike, it's for lazy mechanics
    Dumbest post on the web today!
    So brake cleaner isn't for brakes??
    Are you going to tell me that brake fluid isn't for brakes?
    Brake pads aren't for brakes?
    If it didn't work for you....you did it wrong.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by the mayor
    Dumbest post on the web today!
    So brake cleaner isn't for brakes??
    Are you going to tell me that brake fluid isn't for brakes?
    Brake pads aren't for brakes?
    If it didn't work for you....you did it wrong.

    Actually you might just have made the dumbest post :-


    Car Brake cleaner contains traces of oil that is all fine at the temperature car brakes work at but doesn't work at all well on a MTB brake.

    So DOH!!!!

    Carb Cleaner is oil free and works better, or Meth's, but NOT White Spirit, Isoproponyl is the good stuff though.

  19. #19
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    What I was saying is that Brake Cleaner is OK for the Calipers and all the crap around them but not for Pads and Rotors.
    Pads and Disks are better off when you use it.

  20. #20
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    If it didn't work for you....you did it wrong.[/QUOTE]


    My wife tells me that all the time...

  21. #21
    ballbuster
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    I beg to differ

    Quote Originally Posted by Turveyd
    Actually you might just have made the dumbest post :-


    Car Brake cleaner contains traces of oil that is all fine at the temperature car brakes work at but doesn't work at all well on a MTB brake.

    So DOH!!!!

    Carb Cleaner is oil free and works better, or Meth's, but NOT White Spirit, Isoproponyl is the good stuff though.
    Been using Brake Kleen for years. Works great. The slight film it leaves burns off pretty much instantly.

  22. #22
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    Re: Home Cooking Method

    I think you should consider Julia Child's advice when doing this;
    "There's never too much oregano or garlic!"

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrsbike
    Re: Home Cooking Method

    I think you should consider Julia Child's advice when doing this;
    "There's never too much oregano or garlic!"
    The best way I've cooked pads is with a nice rub of black pepper, rosemary, and a sweet barbeque sauce. Cook at 400f, one hour for each pad, and when you're done deglaze the pads with a red wine, pour some flower and corn starch in and you have a nice sintered demiglace.

  24. #24
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    What wine do you recommend with that?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by manokaiser
    I 've recently changed my Dual XT disc brakes and shifters in my LBS.
    Unfortunately something was wrong with the bleeding procedure, the brake pads were left on the calipers, whitch resulted in contamination of the brake pads and discs. I left the shop with hardly any rear and only minor front braking power and the horrible squicking noise.
    I thought I should google things and see if I can find a solution myself.
    I read a lot of interesting and debating threads on the subject and desided to try a few tricks and see if there can be a cure, or should I just dispose the damn things and go for new brake pads and probably rotors?
    The last option is highly recommented to anyone who wants to stay on the safe side of things.
    I took my chances as follows:

    DAY1:
    First thing, I thought. ,I should deep clean everything up.
    I boiled a cup of water, added dish and cloth washing soaps and droped the pads in there for about an hour.
    I also cleaned the disks with with soap, dried them and cleaned them again with alcohol.
    I washed the water off the pads, then used alcohol here again.
    When finished cleaning I put the brake pads in a small metal dish, covered them with alcohol and fired it up .
    It all burned out, leaving the pad surface clean from marks and shine.
    Then I filed the pads a little bit with a metal tool.
    Next day I tried to bed the pads in with some water spiled on them , braking with soft and hard intervals. Things got a bit better at the rear and much better at the front, which was not so bad to start with. Still I wasn't satisfied, as I need all my braging power at the tip of my finger which took me to another try:

    DAY2
    I took the rear pads off again and dip them in a small container covered "White Spirit", a common oil paint thinner. I left them in there overnight.
    In the morning I took the pads in the metal dish with some of the thinner, added some alcohol and burned out everything.
    I cleaned them with alcohol and then came cooking time .
    I placed the pads with the dish in the oven at 200 degrees C, fun on, for half an hour.
    Again pad alcohol clean up, file rubbing, then disc cleanup treatment first with thinner then alcohol.

    That did the job!!
    Braking power is back as usual, silent and grabby!!

    WARNING!

    As most reasonable people comment on the subject, this is not a safe or recommented way to deal with brake contamination. There are leathal dangers that need to be researched and considered before anyone tries this home cooking brake cake.
    I do not suggest it, I just informe anyone that might be interested that it has worked out for me.
    The suggested way to deal with brake contamination is to go for brand new pads and perhaps disc rotors.

    Happy Trails everyone!!

    Where they organic brake pads?, Sinterd, synthetic or semi-metallic ?, how do you determine what kind of material you have on your brake pad ? thx

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