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  1. #1
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    Ceramic pads characteristics???

    I just switched to ceramic pads on my BB7s. I also swapped the roundagon front rotor to a cleansweep in the same size. I know how ceramic pads work on a car and I assume the same for the bike but I'm wondering if anyone has experience with them.

    So far I've noticed better modulation, the same, possibly more power than stock pads, no noise, and they don't get grabbier as they get hot, something I didn't like about the stock pads. I haven't put them to the test yet on downhill but on the small stuff around town, I can't find a negative with them. So far, I can't think of a reason not to run them. Even the price was cheap at $16 for the alligator pads. I was worred that they wouldn't work when cold but they're fine when cold.

    I did a search and there's not much info on them surprisingly. I was wondering if anyone else can chime in with their experiences.



    Off topic but the stock pads I pulled off look like a semi-metallic, the backing plate is discolored from heat, and the pads were chipped on the leading edge pretty badly.

  2. #2
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    After I saw your post the other day I looked at the PricePoint ad which says

    Alligator Ceramic Sintered Brake Pads offer excellent braking performance in excess of 650 degrees Celcius. It has triple the pad life compared with organic pads and will work in all weather applications.


    So I asked a question of them of their product:

    What differences could I expect in terms of braking performance compared to a metal sintered pad? Organic?

    They replied today with

    Ceramic and organic pads stop faster, and cool faster. They wear out a
    bit faster than sintered metallic's though. Let us know? Take care!


    I've used the stock sintered metallic pads forever with my BB7s and am quite happy, but not sure what to make of the info in the ad and reply...
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikinfoolferlife
    After I saw your post the other day I looked at the PricePoint ad which says

    Alligator Ceramic Sintered Brake Pads offer excellent braking performance in excess of 650 degrees Celcius. It has triple the pad life compared with organic pads and will work in all weather applications.


    So I asked a question of them of their product:

    What differences could I expect in terms of braking performance compared to a metal sintered pad? Organic?

    They replied today with

    Ceramic and organic pads stop faster, and cool faster. They wear out a
    bit faster than sintered metallic's though. Let us know? Take care!


    I've used the stock sintered metallic pads forever with my BB7s and am quite happy, but not sure what to make of the info in the ad and reply...
    Sounds a little vague but that's to be expected I guess. Does that mean that metallic pads have over 3 times the life of organic? 650c is really hot but how does that compare to the various other materials? I really like the feel of the ceramics a lot. Wish I would've worn the stock pads out so I could compare the wear rates. For what it's worth, after about 100 miles of cross country and a 35mile 7,500' downhill ride, there was no visible wear comparing them to my spare set. Only thing was, both front and back were chipped with one of the front pads losing 15-20% of it's surface area. Thanks for the reply.

    Should I do another "test" of the front vs rear? Kidding.

  4. #4
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    Avid's factory metallic compound is very good. Some might have some noise, depending on their conditions, but they are hard to beat for performance. Many factory compounds are hard to beat.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    Avid's factory metallic compound is very good. Some might have some noise, depending on their conditions, but they are hard to beat for performance. Many factory compounds are hard to beat.
    That's kind of what I'm afraid of. Factory is usually good and at only $16, the alligators are cheap, scary cheap. So far I love these things but they've been around the block a few times but not any serious riding. I may try that 35 mile downhill ride again to get some seat time with them.

  6. #6
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    Usually, the only characteristics aftermarket companies are able to give over factory pads is quieter performance, wet or dry. Even Goodridge were complete letdowns in Hope applications. I got the G* metallics and while they offered negligibly quieter performance (dry performance is an area one really never bothers or pays attention to), they wear faster and ultimate braking power is generally not as good as factory. The aftermarkets also tout faster break in, but that's generally because the compounds are soft. Shorter life is also often a consequence as well. I'm quite happy with the compounds Hope, Hayes, and Avid put out there. Shimano is quite good as well (I actually use Shimano metallic pads on my Hope M4's). They all generally place focus on long wear and braking power, sacrificing wet and/or dry quietness and break in to do it.

  7. #7
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    Not to thread jck but I am using XT calipers w/ resin pads and was looking at changing to ceramics also to reduce the noise. Is there a recommended pad that people have been using w/ great success?
    "The original concept of freeriding was that there was no set course, goals or rules to abide by. "
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    Try EBC reds on the F brake; OMFG power brakes! Reds will wear out instantly in the wet. Greens are regular pads (prolly resin), Golds are sintered. For R brake, I use golds in the wet, greens in the dry. F brake gets reds in the dry, golds in the wet. This is the best combo I have found.

  9. #9
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    EBC=absolute garbage

  10. #10
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    Oh JC, don't be shy. Tell us what you really think. lol I have tried several types of pads. Most are short lived; some work better than others. Working at the bike shop enabled me to try most brands and use customers as "guinea pigs" so to speak. EBC make pretty goods pads for SUV's also.

  11. #11
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    Last EBC pads I tried for the BB7 simply didn't interface with the spring well and I tossed 'em after a bit. That was a long time ago, though.

    ps You might want to check your pad/rotor interface to see what was causing the chipping...
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  12. #12
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    I was waiting for you, or someone else to say "but EBC makes pads for such and such".

    That's fine and good, and I don't care how many oems they provide custom work for. EBC's own stuff is so pitiful, it's really not funny. I don't use SUV brake pads on my mtb, by the way.

    Short life compounds, easy disintegration, backing plates that warp only at moderate temps. That's what one gets with EBC.

  13. #13
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    Now I never had a warped backing plate with any disc brake. Not on my hot rod Mustang, my F150, or a mountain bike. The short lived pads Kool Stop, BBB and a few others just wore down a little faster. I have glazed a few, turned the rotor blue and faded the brake to zip. Have had the paint on the backing plate melt and glue the backing plate to the piston. But never warped. IMHO the chipping on the leading edge of a brake pad is of no consequence. We used to file a chamfer on the motorcycles to get more even wear on the front pads. I get to ride in varied conditions, so get to observe the brake performance in dry, wet, mud and some smoking downhills. I came from motorcycles to bicycles. I expect a lot from my brakes. I keep notes and generally try not to buy junk (more than a couple of times).

  14. #14
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    Ok, so since you've never warped a backing plate, no one else has either.

    And naturally, since you have a motorcycle background, you ride harder and have more valid opinions than the simpletons on this site.

  15. #15
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    Ah Grasshopper, I should have said that while I was working at the dealership, I never observed these phenomenons. After all I had to earn money so as to spend on my obsessions. Are you related to my ex-wife?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldMTBfreak
    Now I never had a warped backing plate with any disc brake. Not on my hot rod Mustang, my F150, or a mountain bike. The short lived pads Kool Stop, BBB and a few others just wore down a little faster. I have glazed a few, turned the rotor blue and faded the brake to zip. Have had the paint on the backing plate melt and glue the backing plate to the piston. But never warped. IMHO the chipping on the leading edge of a brake pad is of no consequence. We used to file a chamfer on the motorcycles to get more even wear on the front pads. I get to ride in varied conditions, so get to observe the brake performance in dry, wet, mud and some smoking downhills. I came from motorcycles to bicycles. I expect a lot from my brakes. I keep notes and generally try not to buy junk (more than a couple of times).
    I wonder if chamfering the leading edge on a mtb pad would help stop it from chipping and possibly cut down on noise. I've never had a problem with noise but I don't see it mentioned much on here for those that do.

    I noticed my front rotor had a couple lines cut into it after the first ride with the stock pads. When I recently replaced the pads I noticed some of the material that chipped off embedded itself further back in the pad and matched up to the scoring of the rotor. This was during the break-in, no serious demands were put on the brakes at the time the scoring occured. I wonder how normal this is in the mtb disk brake world.

  17. #17
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    You may have observed how the brake pads wear uneven. The chamfer at the front edge sorta evens this out. The grooves in the rotor are caused by debris embeded in the pad. Get some 80 grit wet/dry sand paper, lay it on flat surface (glass plate) and wet sand the pad. Be gentle, only a couple of strokes in a figure-eight manner. Then wipe on clean cloth. The sintered-metalic pads are very hard, they chew on the rotors. I use soft pads in the dry, sintered-metalic in the wet (yes, I carry both types at all times). My brakes are XTR, and the pads are easily replaced from the top.

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