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  1. #1
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    Can I remove the CPS from my Juicy's?

    I've got some ultimates on order, 160F, 140R. If I've had my frame and fork faced, will I even need the hemispherical washers? Can I just remove them? I thought about it, and I'd assumed that taking them off would push the caliper too close to the rotor. I'd need to space out the caliper again. The reason I'd want to do this is to avoid the potential for having the caliper slightly angled. If there's no way for them to tilt one way or the other, taking out the spacers should have a perfectly aligned brake (not left to right alignment, but tilt)? Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    You can remove them, but they would need to be replaced with solid spacers that have the same stack height.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by notenoughtime
    I've got some ultimates on order, 160F, 140R. If I've had my frame and fork faced, will I even need the hemispherical washers? Can I just remove them? I thought about it, and I'd assumed that taking them off would push the caliper too close to the rotor. I'd need to space out the caliper again. The reason I'd want to do this is to avoid the potential for having the caliper slightly angled. If there's no way for them to tilt one way or the other, taking out the spacers should have a perfectly aligned brake (not left to right alignment, but tilt)? Any thoughts?
    Keep them. Very easy to set up. Even with the frame/fork mounts faced there is no guaranty the caliper would align properly with solid spacers.
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  4. #4
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    I wouldn't...

    facing the frame/fork only ensures that the iterface between the adaptors and the frame/fork are correct. There are other variables that can affect caliper rotor alignment that the CPS washers can compensate for and keep your pads hitting your rotors nice and flat. Avid undstands this and it is the reason that the trialign system is incorporated into their brakes. I'd leave them the way they are. If you set up your brakes properly the calipers won't be tilted unless there is a reason for them to be, i.e. something else is misaligned as well. If you are certain that EVERYTHING that relates to the brakes and rotors is in spec to within .3mm or less then remove them. If not, then I'd leave em.

    Good Dirt
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  5. #5
    Meh.
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    Keep them. Very easy to set up. Even with the frame/fork mounts faced there is no guaranty the caliper would align properly with solid spacers.
    You would think so... But plenty of people have difficulty getting the caliper square to the rotor. And often times this will contribute to the stuttering and noises.

  6. #6
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    I thought that having the CPS could introduce some tilt to the rotor. I know that's the design of them to correct for misalignment. However, I was worried that squeezing the lever and tightening the caliper might leave my with the caliper misaligned. I guess it should be, and I'll just leave it. Thanks.

  7. #7
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    Just for giggles, I removed mine and replaced them with a stack of washers of the same height - sure enough, the caliper was canted just a bit relative to the rotor. So for me, the CPS washers are necessary to get the caliper square to the rotor. You could just try it and see - you might get lucky and have everything square.

  8. #8
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by notenoughtime
    ...However, I was worried that squeezing the lever and tightening the caliper might leave my with the caliper misaligned...
    Wellllllllll... when you do that the calipers and pads should be perfectly aligned. That is the position they are in when the brake is in use. The only "trick" is having the CPS bolts loose enough for the caliper to move easily and tight enough so it is not sloppy.
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  9. #9
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    For me, CPS is a major part of the appeal of Avid brakes. It makes setup a breeze, and is a far superior design to most others on the market. Otherwise just get something lighter...
    A hardtail is forever

  10. #10
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    New question here.

    The only "trick" is having the CPS bolts loose enough for the caliper to move easily and tight enough so it is not sloppy.
    Shiggy, does this mean that you run your brakes with the caliper bolts only "slightly snug" to allow them to "float" when in use? I was just thinking that might not be a bad idea - might wind up dragging and vibrating like heck but may be worth an experiment. Anybody ever try that?

    Dan

  11. #11
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    No they are not a "floating" design....

    just tighten the caliper bolts to the manufacturers spec, (70 to 90inlb). I think what shiggy means is during the set up process. The idea is to have them loose enough so that the calipers will self adjust when you calmp down the pads. Then tighten the bolts to the specified torque and your pads should be perfectly aligned to the rotor. You don't want a caliper that will move once it is secured for use. A caliper that will move on it's own makes rotor rub a dead certianty, can result in the caliper becoming too loose with use, and may cause damaged or broken bolts and/or cracked caliper mounting holes. So use the proper torque for the mounting bolts and secure them calipers!

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

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