Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    11

    New question here. Caliper and lever Compatibility help!!!

    This may be a very simple question but how Compatible are different brake calipers and levers. Is there just standard hose size that you can attach whatever to? At the moment I have formula B4 brakes but the levers have given up so I wanted to put some different ones on. I do understand that different brakes take different types of fluids though so can anyone give some ideas on this? many thanks, dylan

  2. #2
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,589
    Formula brakes use DOT fluid. Any master can work with any caliper as long as the fluid is the same and their is the same number of caliper pistons. Catches are in the hose ID which can put a damper on the master/caliper fitting. MTB goes through great extremes to be different, guess it give them the feeling of accomplishing something new.Check that the hose ID is the same and make sure their are fittings to complete the morph.
    Formotion Products
    http://www.formot

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Any master can work with any caliper as long as the fluid is the same
    Is there any reason why I cannot put mineral oil in brakes that are made for DOT? It is less corrosive so how could it have a negative affect? (or the other way round for that matter) Thanks for the info

  4. #4
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,589
    Quote Originally Posted by dylanasena
    Is there any reason why I cannot put mineral oil in brakes that are made for DOT? It is less corrosive so how could it have a negative affect? (or the other way round for that matter) Thanks for the info
    The rubber seal guts are designed for the intended fluids, the seals will get eaten apart.
    Formotion Products
    http://www.formot

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    11
    Ahh ok, that makes sense. Thanks

  6. #6
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    17,516
    Actually it's not the number of pistons that matters, but rather the ratio of the area of the pistons to the area of the MC piston.

    F1/A1 = F2/A2

    The volume pushed at the MC is equal to the volume that pushes out the pistons in the caliper.

    V1 = V2

    If you change the size of the MC piston in relation to the pistons, it can result in too much or too little lever travel.

  7. #7
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,589
    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL

    F1/A1 = F2/A2

    V1 = V2

    .
    You are such a nerd
    Formotion Products
    http://www.formot

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •