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  1. #1
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    Breaking in new disk brakes

    I searched for this, but didn't find it..

    I just put on two new XTR rotors. What's the right way to break in new disk brakes?

    Since others will probably find this thread, what other brand specific break-in processes are there?
    2008 Stumpjumper FSR S-Works
    2005 Stumpjumper FSR Expert Disk

  2. #2
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    they're all the same...

    just do a bunch of hard stops, easiest on a long paved downhill. say 20mph to 0, as quickly as possible, 10 times. use good technique...don't endo and don't skid.

  3. #3
    nnn
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    There's always going to be conflicting opinions on this but after many trials I have found the best way is either to just ride along as you normally do (knowing you don't have full braking power) or do many easy stops (say 20mph to 10 with a little brake pressure then cycle around for a few seconds to cool down) - most car brake pads have similar instructions from the manufacturer.
    Hurtling down a hill and blazing the brakes often glazes the pads and then you have to score them.
    "Life begins at 140" Richard Burns
    http://www.nikolay-k.com

  4. #4
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    Agree with nnn...

    The downhill method makes it easier. If it's long enough you can get three or four good cydles out of it. But don't go from 20 to 0 with hard braking! You will glaze the pads, esspecially organics. Simply start the run and get up to 15 or 20mph, then brake down to 5 or 10mph with "normal" brake lever pressure, then realease. DO NOT STOP completely. Doing so on new warm or hot brakes will deposit extra material where the pads come to rest on the rotors. The extra pad material on the spot where the pads come to a stop can cause a pulse in the brakes. It'll wear off eventually but it's annoying till it does. If you have sufficient hill left then get back up to speed and do it again. From there for your cool down, ride back up the hill, then repeat the cycle. Do this a few times then give it a rest and go ride. The key is to imbed brake material on the rotor and bed in the pads, without creating so much heat that you glaze the pads. Even then this won't complete the bed in process. It will make it faster, but there will still be a bit of room for improvement even after 10 runs down the hill. This is just a method for folks that don't ride everyday. If you ride every day, then just ride! It'll be just as fast as the downhill method. It'll just happen a bit more gradually.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  5. #5
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    I go back and forth between metalic pads and organic/resin pads, depending on conditions.

    Are one type of pad better during the break in?
    2008 Stumpjumper FSR S-Works
    2005 Stumpjumper FSR Expert Disk

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