Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 101 to 150 of 152
  1. #101
    mtbr member
    Reputation: HDTVdevil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    289
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Richard View Post
    Would BFO work with me to retrofit my brakes? I am unclear as to whom to speak with about the issues I'm experiencing.
    Yes, they offer upgrades. Mine were shipped to them this week for upgrading.

    H.D.

    Sent from my GT-N7100 using Tapatalk 2

  2. #102
    Registered text offender
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,137
    Quote Originally Posted by HDTVdevil View Post
    Yes, they offer upgrades. Mine were shipped to them this week for upgrading.

    H.D.

    Sent from my GT-N7100 using Tapatalk 2
    Thank you, please report back when you receive them as I would be interested to know how much of an improvement/ change you feel.

  3. #103
    mtbr member
    Reputation: HDTVdevil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    289
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Richard View Post
    Thank you, please report back when you receive them as I would be interested to know how much of an improvement/ change you feel.
    Looks luke i will have them back around the first of feb...
    Update: make next monday

    Sent from my GT-N7100 using Tapatalk 2
    Last edited by HDTVdevil; 01-25-2013 at 03:05 PM.

  4. #104
    mtbr member
    Reputation: HDTVdevil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    289
    Brakes are back. Hope to have the time to put them on before the weekend.

    Sent from my GT-N7100 using Tapatalk 2

  5. #105
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,827
    I am still intrigued by these, but the prices are just out there (and I do love to spend money).

    Even for something as simple as a PM adapter is $40 - you can find adaptors from other manufacturers that are essentially the same thing for $10. And dont tell me its cost of where they are produced, as I have found other $10 adapters that are also manufactured in first world countries.

  6. #106
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,827
    So tempted to order a set of these from competitive cyclist as they advertise unconditional lifetime returns:

    "We want you to be satisfied, now and forever. If at any time — now, next month, or in 30 years — you're not 100% satisfied with the products you've purchased from us, return them. We'll issue a refund ASAP, no questions asked. "

    Buy em, try em, write a review on em, then return em a year later.

    If only their thing said a COMPLETE refund I would probably pull out the credit card right now. That and the fact that being in Canada I would get killed with CC fees for international purchases/refunds.

    Will just have to wait for someone near Whistler to get a set.

  7. #107
    Weird huh?
    Reputation: cmdrpiffle's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    2,267
    Quote Originally Posted by GSJ1973 View Post
    Carbon filled polycarbonate...
    This! When I read 'carbon fiber' I expect to see layered weaves, not dark plastic with 'stuff' in it.
    Poaching Demo...that's why we can't have nice things...

  8. #108
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,827
    Quote Originally Posted by cmdrpiffle View Post
    This! When I read 'carbon fiber' I expect to see layered weaves, not dark plastic with 'stuff' in it.
    Yup, marketing has you thinking the weaves is what carbon fiber looks like.

  9. #109
    fc
    fc is online now
    mtbr founder Administrator
    Reputation: fc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1996
    Posts
    24,363
    I've been riding it for a while so here's my take on the matter.

    Review: Brake Force One | Mountain Bike Review

  10. #110
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,827
    Anyone else that has paid money for these give us an update?

  11. #111
    RIDE...
    Reputation: MarcoL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    427

    BrakeForce One, new player in town

    O have a pair, they are ok, more power than shimanos, Maguras; and too much modulation, easy to bleed, if you can afford buy them..ahh looks very cool

  12. #112
    mtbr member
    Reputation: HDTVdevil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    289
    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    Anyone else that has paid money for these give us an update?
    After a few months riding with the upgraded versions, I am very satisfied with them. I would recommend them.

  13. #113
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    243
    I can only confirm my enthusiastic appreciation... they work great. Very expensive, but eccellent.

  14. #114
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,827
    Quote Originally Posted by MarcoL View Post
    O have a pair, they are ok, more power than shimanos, Maguras; and too much modulation, easy to bleed, if you can afford buy them..ahh looks very cool
    Too much modulation?

  15. #115
    007
    007 is offline
    b a n n e d
    Reputation: 007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    6,017
    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    Too much modulation?
    Wondering if this is to imply that the lever is incredibly soft, which is a common complaint. I can see how if the lever were too soft, it would create a very vague experience at the lever. Similar to if there were "infinite" modulation.

    There's a lot of riders who don't like Hope's because the lever feels soft to them, which is because they have a wider range of modulation in comparison to some other offerings.
    Alcohol may lead nowhere, but it sure is the scenic route!

  16. #116
    RIDE...
    Reputation: MarcoL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    427

    BrakeForce One, new player in town

    It is very soft, but you can adjust it on the fly, power is good, you can put them very hot on descends and there is no lack of power...

  17. #117
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    243
    The point is, every brake has its travel. With normal disc brakes, as you touch the brake, the caliper immediately locks the wheel. With BFO brakes, the more you squeeze, the more you brake, therefore, you can lock the wheel but you need to get accustomed to the fact that you muct push the lever deeper into its travel. In a word, modulation in spades (well, 3 words). But, I repeat, you have to get accustomed to this characteristic.
    Last edited by even; 06-03-2013 at 09:04 AM.

  18. #118
    Mr. Knowitall
    Reputation: hssp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    852
    I just upgraded to the 2-finger lever blades, and the feeling was finally something I could handle. It seems more like a normal brake, but with way more power. I was able to run the lever closer to the bars etc. The only thing I found is that the position of the lever, contact point and pistons during bleeding is crucial. I think I need to have the contact point a bit more to the + side when bleeding(recommended is all the way to "-", but that gave me a too small gap on the pads.

  19. #119
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    158
    Hello,

    I'm having trouble adjusting my 2013-14 Brakeforce 1 Brakes. When I dial the pad adjustment to create more room for the rotor, which is a main reason for purchasing these brakes, the brake lever collapses to the handlebar and the brake will not work. It feels like there is no pressure in the brake line - the brake lever just goes limp. The issue only happens when I get to the last 2-3 clicks on the adjustment dial.

    I has an extremely good LBS install the brakes, and they cannot figure it out. Any suggestions?

    Stephen Walters

  20. #120
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,827
    Quote Originally Posted by swalters View Post
    Hello,

    I'm having trouble adjusting my 2013-14 Brakeforce 1 Brakes. When I dial the pad adjustment to create more room for the rotor, which is a main reason for purchasing these brakes, the brake lever collapses to the handlebar and the brake will not work. It feels like there is no pressure in the brake line - the brake lever just goes limp. The issue only happens when I get to the last 2-3 clicks on the adjustment dial.

    I has an extremely good LBS install the brakes, and they cannot figure it out. Any suggestions?

    Stephen Walters
    If you must have the unique, then keep trying with the brakeforce. If you want something that is affordable and just works, the masses are loving their Shimano XT product.

  21. #121
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    243
    How many turns did you rotate the dial? Because it's very sensitive. A quarter turn makes a lot of difference.

    I have both XT and BFO and the second ones are much lighter and work much better.
    Last edited by even; 04-01-2015 at 06:17 AM.

  22. #122
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,827
    Bump - Any more people with BFO experiences?

  23. #123
    Evolutionsverlierer
    Reputation: acer66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    894
    Never heard about them before and now they have one with water instead of oil.

    Brakeforceone | BFO H2O
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Avid is spelled wrong, there should be an 'O' in there.

  24. #124
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,827
    Quote Originally Posted by acer66 View Post
    Never heard about them before and now they have one with water instead of oil.

    Brakeforceone | BFO H2O
    Ya, their H2O system is what prompted me to digup this old thread. I was very interested in them - but they have not really caught on over in north america so its tough to get a good feel for them. And their pricepoint is just too much to try it just because!

  25. #125
    RIDE...
    Reputation: MarcoL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    427
    I had some; they are not as powerful; they break easy, is a pain to adjust; I went back to my formulas and shimanos

  26. #126
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    48

    New BFO H20 brakes

    I just received the first sets of BFO H20 2016 brakes, here are some pictures of them just out of the box...
    BrakeForce One, new player in town-dsc_0489.jpgBrakeForce One, new player in town-dsc_0490.jpgBrakeForce One, new player in town-dsc_0493.jpgBrakeForce One, new player in town-dsc_0494.jpgBrakeForce One, new player in town-dsc_0496.jpg

    Mounting them om my bike is the next step and testing them out will happen this weekend...

  27. #127
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,430
    Quote Originally Posted by even View Post
    The point is, every brake has its travel. With normal disc brakes, as you touch the brake, the caliper immediately locks the wheel. With BFO brakes, the more you squeeze, the more you brake, therefore, you can lock the wheel but you need to get accustomed to the fact that you muct push the lever deeper into its travel. In a word, modulation in spades (well, 3 words). But, I repeat, you have to get accustomed to this characteristic.
    In any hydraulic rake system, the only lever or pedal movement should be as the pads are moving to engage the rotors. Once the pads make contact with the rotors the lever should not move any more. No movement whatsoever once applied. A soft lever that moves more the harder you press does not equal modulation. In fact, it's the opposite.

    Once braking has begun, there are several reasons the lever might move more. Air in the system, brake lines expanding (what type of hoses are used in these brakes?), compression of parts such as pads, bad alignment of caliper to rotor with the resulting rotor deflection causing a soft lever as it bends, caliper flex, or it could be all of the above combined.

    The best modulation is from a rock hard lever that does not move at all once the pads have contacted the rotors. I've driven enough race cars where the pads are allowed to rub on the rotors slightly that literally had no detectable pedal movement whatsoever and without girlie ABS to know that modulation is so much better on those than on a mushy production brake system with long lengths of rubber hoses, ABS in which the modulator can cause a loss in modulation, caliper flex from a single or dual piston caliper. Just adding a 4 piston caliper with a nice bridge for strength and rigidity with the same piston area as the stock 1 piston calipers on my car gave less pedal travel because the caliper was not flexing as much.

    It sounds as if you're touting a defect or at least poor performance as a positive thing. Please explain how a lever continues to move once the pads and rotors have made contact. I'm not trying to be harsh but this doesn't add up.

    Onto the H2O brakes, water is fine, I've used it in car brakes in an emergency. The obvious problem is boiling. It's going to have a boiling point half of the worst DOT and mineral oil systems with Magura being the exception. My fluid regularly sees 300F on a downhill run with a set of brakes that are known for shedding heat exceptionally well. I can't imagine these "water" brakes aren't going to come with restrictions such as a weight limit and usage limit such as no downhill usage and a 150lb weight limit. I hope they use the right caliper/master/piston materials to deal with the lack of lube. Time will tell if corrosion and/or excessive wear on moving parts becomes an issue.
    '08 Hardrock HRXC
    '09 Epic Comp
    '14 Trance SX -

  28. #128
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    4,688
    ^BrakeForce One can use water because the water never touched the pistons in the caliper. The lever pressurizes the water which drives a 2nd piston in the caliper which then in turn pressurizes the brake pistons which acts on the pads. Kinda like a Rube Goldberg pf brakes.

    BrakeForce One, new player in town-p4pb9524121.jpg
    BrakeForce One, new player in town-brakeforce_one_2014_funktion.jpg

  29. #129
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,430
    Quote Originally Posted by the-one1 View Post
    ^BrakeForce One can use water because the water never touched the pistons in the caliper. The lever pressurizes the water which drives a 2nd piston in the caliper which then in turn pressurizes the brake pistons which acts on the pads. Kinda like a Rube Goldberg pf brakes.
    That makes sense. I can't quite make out the diagram yet but you're saying the water barely comes into contact with the caliper and it does not come into contact with the main Pistons at all? That would make sense. The reason I ruled that out previously is the H2O version didn't look like it had the extra internals as the mineral oil ones did. From the outside it looks like a standard caliper to me.

    I'll still be interested in how hot it get where the water is. I've run BB7s and the calipers could get very hot so while the design as you describe would be a huge improvement in fluid temp reduction I wonder if there will be issues on extended downhills with 240lb people like me. I guess only time will tell. How long have the "water" brakes been out in Europe? Are they already proven to be problem free or are they still too new to say for sure?
    '08 Hardrock HRXC
    '09 Epic Comp
    '14 Trance SX -

  30. #130
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    4,688
    The diagram I posted is of the older mineral oil model. I can't find one for their H20 model, but chances are it's of the same idea.

  31. #131
    Slovakia (Europe)
    Reputation: PeterG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    578
    What about riding in winter, when the temperatures are below 0C? Is it salty water inside ?

  32. #132
    Registered text offender
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,137
    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    Bump - Any more people with BFO experiences?
    I tried and tried to get mine working satisfactorily and it was futile. I dealt with Ian and later with BFO direct. I was charged to have them retrofit with the newer lines and assured they tested and worked flawlessly- they did not. I was told they needed a re-bleed due to the altitude during shipping, my very competent LBS did so and they exhibited the same behavior.

    Some report positively about their BFO's, I cannot. I spent top dollar and was then charged for a retrofit that was introduced to solve their early design issues and it fixed nothing. They tried to help, but the product I received was for whatever reason beyond repair and with as many eyes that had scrutinized these I don't feel they were faulty, but rather an accurate representation of the product line.

    As an early supporter I feel there was much more that they could have done, and it boggled me that a company trying to expand their market overseas would not go further for the sake of their own reputation. I could never in good conscience recommend someone consider purchasing BFO's, and I really wanted to.

  33. #133
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    4,688
    ^What was the exact issues with it?

  34. #134
    Registered text offender
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,137
    The constant need to adjust the levers as the fluid heated up and caused a squeak/ drag, and the levers inability to fully return when disengaged.

  35. #135
    Specialized
    Reputation: karimian5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    754
    Don't have any issues with mine . I just shortened the hoses, fitted new fixings, modified the brakes (to make them slightly lighter) and they work great . Not as sharp feeling as my Hopes but the technology is amazing.

  36. #136
    mtbr member
    Reputation: andrepsz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    758
    So.......what if we connect the calipers of a BFO to an open system lever? I am no hydraulic expert, but if the secret behind BFO is on the caliper (the 'two stage booster design')...I don't really see a reason why they can't be setup as open system?

    Ok...I get it, mineral oil, no reservoir...all that contribute's to give extra power 'feel' (no blather = less room for the fluid = sharper response = feels like more power)....but again....if a open system lever is combined with these clever BFO caliper's .....the only difference would be noticed on the lever actuation, probably softer (blather effect), but power wise....I think would be the same since the heart of that is in the calipers. thoughts?

    (I have a set of BFO1 in the mail right now!)...just considering some ideas...

  37. #137
    damned rocks...
    Reputation: Aglo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    887
    Fully disclosure, I'm not a fan off the BFO, in whatever incarnation they came, never tried one and probably never will, the idea behind it and the final product (taking into account the reviews) was never something that sparked any interest in me.

    That being said.

    Isn't the "two stage booster design" designed to make the same thing as the Shimano Servo Wave lever system?
    Meaning, reduce the lever travel it takes the pads to fully engage the rotor.
    So, if the two systems happens to have the same master cylinder diameter, that seems unlikely , you would just ramp up even more the "two stage booster design". Not sure if it's a good thing.
    Recall the people complaining about the on/off thing about Shimano brakes, now multiply by two the same effect .

  38. #138
    mtbr member
    Reputation: andrepsz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    758
    [QUOTE=Aglo;12485845 ...never tried one and probably never will.. [/QUOTE]

    At this point in time I'm as skeptical as you are. I'm having the opportunity finally try them out (ebay find: $180 for the set!!!) and I'll gladly form my own feedback and I'll be happy to report here what I find.

    Should come in the mail this next Tuesday!

  39. #139
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,911
    Quote Originally Posted by Aglo View Post
    Isn't the "two stage booster design" designed to make the same thing as the Shimano Servo Wave lever system?
    Yes, exactly, only Shimano's solution is better. Variable leverage ratio is not new or novel, and even BFO's solution is a copy of technology that existed before power brakes.

  40. #140
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,430
    I agree with the majority. Variable leverage has been around forever, even in non hydraulic systems. Even in cable operated throttles on cars you can see a lot of times where the cable pulls on a cam shaped "pulley" so it pulls more quickly when you first hit the throttle to make the engine seem more responsive and more powerful at low throttle. I like how Shimano does it because the servo wave system is practically a non wear setup. Adding another piston and more "stuff" to the hydraulic system seems like more stuff to wear out and go wrong. If the servo wave stops functioning you're either going to have a little more lever travel and full power or you're going to have normal lever travel but a little less power. Either way the brakes function. I like the most simple hydraulic design, a master and a slave piston, a port to allow fluid from the reservoir into the pressure side of the system, and not additional pistons, check valves, springs, etc.

    Maybe I'm being unfair to Brake Force One because as far as I know they haven't had any failures. Maybe time will prove them to be a great system but right now I would rather let other people try them out.
    '08 Hardrock HRXC
    '09 Epic Comp
    '14 Trance SX -

  41. #141
    mtbr member
    Reputation: andrepsz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    758

    BrakeForce One, new player in town

    Did I first ride last night on my BFO's...never needed to adjust the pads after long descents as everybody complains....it is in fact powerful, I think I found to brakes that I was looking for...forever.
    Last edited by andrepsz; 02-24-2016 at 11:37 AM.

  42. #142
    damned rocks...
    Reputation: Aglo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    887
    Quote Originally Posted by andrepsz View Post
    Did I first ride last night on my BFO's...never needed to adjust the pads after long descents as everybody complains....it is in fact powerful, I think I found to brakes that I was looking for...forever.
    That's nice .
    How do you compare them to single piston Shimano's (SLX, XT, XTR) , or to the Guides?

  43. #143
    mtbr member
    Reputation: andrepsz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    758

    BrakeForce One, new player in town

    Quote Originally Posted by Aglo View Post
    That's nice .
    How do you compare them to single piston Shimano's (SLX, XT, XTR) , or to the Guides?
    I recently got the XTR M9000's but didn't work for me...but a have a unique case only having the small finger to brake and missing all 3 of them next to it, the one finger lever is way too short for me, also, doesn't have the pad adjuster...and that's a feature that I really need for my case so I can set the lever very close to the handlebar.


    Did one ride...and I'm putting for sale on ebay.

    As for the BFO's, first of all it has the two finger lever, so that problem is solved. Second huge difference and benefit for me is the extra power! its true and I can clearly feel the difference comparing to the M9000's and from my old Sram XX's.

    Since all the work goes to my small finger, I really appreciate the help of the BFO's design, don't need to make any effort and is already locking the wheel.

  44. #144
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CrozCountry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,166
    What does it mean no expansion chamber? When the pad gets worn the lever moves closer to the bar like cable brakes?
    Last edited by CrozCountry; 02-26-2016 at 02:05 AM.

  45. #145
    damned rocks...
    Reputation: Aglo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    887
    Quote Originally Posted by CrozCountry View Post
    What does it mean no expansion chamber? When the pad gets worn the lever moves closer to the bar like cable brakes?
    Yes it's true, but as a closed system you have true pad adjustment.
    As the only thing you need to do is to screw the Pressure Point Adjustment, and because they don't have a bladder, doing this the pads move closer to the rotor.

  46. #146
    damned rocks...
    Reputation: Aglo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    887
    Quote Originally Posted by andrepsz View Post
    (...)
    Since all the work goes to my small finger, I really appreciate the help of the BFO's design, don't need to make any effort and is already locking the wheel.
    In case you come to have to replace the BFO, you can try the Shimano's brakes with trekking lever's.
    BrakeForce One, new player in town-7116949511_eac1226e89_c.jpg

    But you will not have pad adjustment, as that thing doesn't work .
    Last edited by Aglo; 02-26-2016 at 04:54 AM.

  47. #147
    mtbr member
    Reputation: andrepsz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    758

    BrakeForce One, new player in town

    But you will not have pad adjustment, as that thing doesn't work .
    Its a very specific combination of adjustments that I need. If lever is too long without pad adjustment, yes I can put them close to the handlebar but lever will travel way too much and will touch the grip before full braking (that's the case with the XTR M9000). So far with the BFO I'm able to place it right where I need, adjust the pads closer to the rotors and the lever travel is actually quite short at full braking...of course I can do the same with a ton of other brakes out there, I can do the same with my first Gen Sram XX set....but the BFO is clearly stronger...I'm sticking with that.

    In this picture I'm not even pulling the lever, just laying my finger on top of it...to show that is in the perfect position.

  48. #148
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CrozCountry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,166
    So the step piston changes the leverage of hydraulic system?
    Is the idea to create less pressure in the hose so it does not expand much?
    Can't they get the same effect by using larger pistons in the caliper?

  49. #149
    mtbr member
    Reputation: andrepsz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    758
    Quote Originally Posted by CrozCountry View Post
    So the step piston changes the leverage of hydraulic system?
    Is the idea to create less pressure in the hose so it does not expand much?
    Can't they get the same effect by using larger pistons in the caliper?
    'As with most closed systems, as the brake fluid heats up and expands the pads get forced ever closer to the rotors and stop working properly. This is why almost all brake systems to day are open systems.

    So to compensate for the expansion of the brake fluid the BFO callipers are huge thus allowing the pads to be positioned far away from the rotors, so they’re not troubled by expanding fluid.


    BFO have a secret weapon in the huge calliper, the ‘brake booster’. The calliper piston is stepped, so as the pads make first contact with the rotor the cylinder inside seals off the fluid against the brake pads and compresses it more, thus squeezing more pressure onto the pads and effectively boosting the power in the later part of the lever stroke.

    In a nutshell the brakes hide a two-stage booster that allows the pads to travel a greater distance to the rotors and also ramp up the power as they engage to give you (theoretically) serious amounts of stopping power.

    In practice this means when you pull the BFO lever your pads actually make contact with the rotor very quickly, then the rest of you lever stroke is all about extracting more/less power and modulating the brakes. This is why the levers are for one-finger only, as BFO believe with their brakes one finger is all you will ever need.
    ' - Article here

  50. #150
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,911
    Quote Originally Posted by andrepsz View Post
    'As with most closed systems, as the brake fluid heats up and expands the pads get forced ever closer to the rotors and stop working properly. This is why almost all brake systems to day are open systems.

    So to compensate for the expansion of the brake fluid the BFO callipers are huge thus allowing the pads to be positioned far away from the rotors, so they’re not troubled by expanding fluid.


    BFO have a secret weapon in the huge calliper, the ‘brake booster’. The calliper piston is stepped, so as the pads make first contact with the rotor the cylinder inside seals off the fluid against the brake pads and compresses it more, thus squeezing more pressure onto the pads and effectively boosting the power in the later part of the lever stroke.

    In a nutshell the brakes hide a two-stage booster that allows the pads to travel a greater distance to the rotors and also ramp up the power as they engage to give you (theoretically) serious amounts of stopping power.

    In practice this means when you pull the BFO lever your pads actually make contact with the rotor very quickly, then the rest of you lever stroke is all about extracting more/less power and modulating the brakes. This is why the levers are for one-finger only, as BFO believe with their brakes one finger is all you will ever need.
    ' - Article here
    Of course, this can also be accomplished with variable leverage at the lever end, as it is with BFO's competition. They pretend this is something new when it is not. Their booster itself was invented before they were born.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Anyone riding tomorrow in town or out of town?
    By clockwork in forum Arizona
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 07-15-2011, 10:19 PM
  2. Move over Saint, there's a new player in town!
    By Nick_M2R in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 92
    Last Post: 11-25-2010, 11:45 AM
  3. P-Town Wheels? Worthy of NoBrow hipsters and P-Town himself?
    By slcrockymountainrider in forum Utah
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-28-2010, 03:39 PM
  4. OT: MiniDisc player/MP3 Player reccomendations?
    By cdloental78 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-10-2005, 12:53 PM
  5. What MP3 Player to Buy?
    By KERKOVEJ in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: 11-08-2004, 10:37 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •