Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    monster member
    Reputation: Wheelspeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    634

    Brake Drag After Wheel Removal

    Anyone ever have to readjust the caliper every time they remove and reinstall a wheel, like to fix a flat?

    All I can think of is that the teeth at the ends of the caps of the hub dig into the aluminum of the frame differently. It's a recently built bike with new hubs, so I guess they're still digging into the aluminum. I re-set the caliper perfectly, which takes some care with these Avid Elixir CR brakes, and then the first flat I get leaves me with a dragging brake for the rest of the ride... front or back. (Aluminum drop-outs on both ends.)

    I'm sick of it! Does it go away after awhile? As the drop-outs get more chewed up by the hub ends, will the problem go away? Or, should I use some kind of washer?
    Have fun!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4,673
    You could be adjusting the QR differently every time.

  3. #3
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,000
    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelspeed
    Anyone ever have to readjust the caliper every time they remove and reinstall a wheel, like to fix a flat?

    All I can think of is that the teeth at the ends of the caps of the hub dig into the aluminum of the frame differently. It's a recently built bike with new hubs, so I guess they're still digging into the aluminum. I re-set the caliper perfectly, which takes some care with these Avid Elixir CR brakes, and then the first flat I get leaves me with a dragging brake for the rest of the ride... front or back. (Aluminum drop-outs on both ends.)

    I'm sick of it! Does it go away after awhile? As the drop-outs get more chewed up by the hub ends, will the problem go away? Or, should I use some kind of washer?
    Get some QuickNuts

    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2,621
    Keep weight on the tire as you tighten the QR to be sure the axle stays bottomed out in the drop-outs.

  5. #5
    monster member
    Reputation: Wheelspeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    634
    Forgot to mention I'm using a bolt-on axle since noticing the cheap QR that came with the wheel tried to move the axle a bit as I cinched it down.

    Yep, keeping weight on the wheel.

    Adjustment of the QR or bolt-on doesn't change the width of the hub.
    Have fun!

  6. #6
    human dehumidifier
    Reputation: wv_bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,052
    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelspeed
    Forgot to mention I'm using a bolt-on axle since noticing the cheap QR that came with the wheel tried to move the axle a bit as I cinched it down.

    Yep, keeping weight on the wheel.

    Adjustment of the QR or bolt-on doesn't change the width of the hub.
    I was skeptical too, until I proved it to myself. I use a QR, and loosening a 1/4 turn, or tightening a 1/4 turn would change how much (or if) the brakes would rub. Not sure how you could repeat that experiment with a bolt-on hub though.
    When you get older, much of your hate comes from knowledge and experience, which is why really old people hate everyone

  7. #7
    ouch....
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    4,803
    Yep that's what it probably is.....

    I do not notice the issue with the 15QR on my new bike, because the nut the axle threads into stays in the fork in the same spot, so it is tightened exactly the same each time....
    brake stays lined up.
    Riding.....

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •