Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 32
  1. #1
    56-year-old teenager
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,763

    Good job! Bled my Juicys... big difference!

    I've had my current bike for almost 2 years now. The Juicy 7s came as a "pre-bled" set. Just bolt on and go. So that's what I did. I always felt the rear brake was a little squishy compared to the front, but chalked it up to the longer hose.

    Last week I got the Avid bleed kit and bled them for the first time. WOAH! Big improvement in lever firmness and travel. The rear is still slightly softer, but much less so. And I finally see why someone might want to use the pad contact dial. I may well bring the levers a little closer to the bar now.

    So if you've got "pre-bled" Juicys and the lever is the least bit squishy... give 'em a bleed.
    Work is the curse of the biking classes.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dnoyeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    451
    Mine is a bit squishy. Looking to bleed for this season. How do you like the bleed kit? Is it worth it? Did you change the fluid? What fluid are you using?

  3. #3
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    17,516
    You have to use the bleed kit to bleed the Juicy. Be sure to read the instructions well. Degas the fluid thoroughly. There's a video on youtube about how to bleed the brakes as well.

    You replace some fluid when you bleed it. It does not take much to replace all the fluid.

    A bottle of DOT 5.1 is included. If it is not enough, go to your local autoparts store.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ryan123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    879
    If you have some spare cash and want to improve the performance even more, grab some Goodridge hoses and fittings. Expensive, yes, improvement to the level of $$ spend, not really sure, but definitely better than the original hoses.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: qdawgg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    703
    Quote Originally Posted by dnoyeb
    Mine is a bit squishy. Looking to bleed for this season. How do you like the bleed kit? Is it worth it? Did you change the fluid? What fluid are you using?
    --> I just bought the bleed kit and have been too lazy to actually do it but when I do (maybe today) I found the 2 best? videos for the whole process. The videos are almost identical except for a couple little things but I'm sure the result would be about the same for either one that you follow.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mg6NbIjmOM

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GzZkEIrCBJ0&NR=1

  6. #6
    56-year-old teenager
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,763
    The bleed kit is essential for Avid hydraulic brakes. Bleeding is pretty straightforward and quick, just be sure to read the directions. The bleeding process flushes out old fluid and replaces it with new fluid. If you fill the caliper syringe more than 1/2 way, you can be sure of replacing most of the fluid. You'll see the color difference as the old fluid comes out.

    Be sure to catch and clean up any drips very quickly - brake fluid eats paint.

    Better hoses (probably Goodridge) were on my list, but I'm really happy with the way my brakes feel now.
    Work is the curse of the biking classes.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: qdawgg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    703
    Chucko - quick question if you have an answer. In the instructions it says that you need to have the reach adjustment screw adjusted correctly but I couldn't understand from the directions which way I need the screw turned. Because I really needed my brakes bled I had adjusted the screws so that the levers were "pushed out" away from the handlebars as far as possible. Do I want to keep the adjustment like this when I bleed the brakes or do I want to adjust the screw so I am moving the brake lever back closer to the handlebars? I already did the bleeding - front brake came out pretty well, catches pretty quickly. The rear brake doesn't catch until it is pretty close to the handlebar - close enough that the brake handle hits my knuckles before the pads completely catch the rotor.

  8. #8
    56-year-old teenager
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,763
    Yeah, "pushed out" is right. The main thing is being able to bottom the master cylinder before the lever hits the bar.

    It sounds like something is seriously wrong with your rear brake. Do the pads make contact with the rotor early, but don't apply full pressure until you're bending the lever on the bar? Or is it that the pads don't even make contact until the lever is into the grip? If the former, then either you have significant air still in the system, or the hose is ballooning.
    Work is the curse of the biking classes.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Hand/of/Midas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,681
    Quote Originally Posted by qdawgg
    Chucko - quick question if you have an answer. In the instructions it says that you need to have the reach adjustment screw adjusted correctly but I couldn't understand from the directions which way I need the screw turned. Because I really needed my brakes bled I had adjusted the screws so that the levers were "pushed out" away from the handlebars as far as possible. Do I want to keep the adjustment like this when I bleed the brakes or do I want to adjust the screw so I am moving the brake lever back closer to the handlebars? I already did the bleeding - front brake came out pretty well, catches pretty quickly. The rear brake doesn't catch until it is pretty close to the handlebar - close enough that the brake handle hits my knuckles before the pads completely catch the rotor.
    You want to bleed it in the loosest setting, so afterwards you can then firm it up to your liking.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ssr2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    137
    How much n where did u purchase the kit?
    09 Specialized StumperJumper FSR Comp

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: qdawgg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    703
    Quote Originally Posted by chucko58
    Yeah, "pushed out" is right. The main thing is being able to bottom the master cylinder before the lever hits the bar.

    It sounds like something is seriously wrong with your rear brake. Do the pads make contact with the rotor early, but don't apply full pressure until you're bending the lever on the bar? Or is it that the pads don't even make contact until the lever is into the grip? If the former, then either you have significant air still in the system, or the hose is ballooning.
    --> The rear will make contact with the pads at about "half" pull and then needs a little bit more before full pressure. Not bottoming out the lever into the grip before full pressure, I just can't get full pressure without moving my fingers towards the outside part of my grip or putting 3 fingers on the brake handle. I think I needed to "work" the syringe at the caliper a little bit more than I did -- I didn't think about how much more brake line there was to worry about when I was bleeding the brakes. Hopefully that is the issue.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ADDam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,168
    My Juicy's feel like a switch, lol. There's ON or OFF. With a Nevegal on the front, I have a great chance at endo-ing.
    Adam Ann Arbor, MI

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: qdawgg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    703
    Quote Originally Posted by ssr2
    How much n where did u purchase the kit?
    --> I bought my bleed kit at pricepoint. The bleed kit is exactly the same from last year to this year so I bought the '08 kit - save a lot of money. I didn't realize until after I bought the kit that it isn't just a throw away kit, now that I have it I should be able to use it quite a bit before I need another one. Here is the link.

    http://pricepoint.resultspage.com/se...&asug=&x=0&y=0

  14. #14
    56-year-old teenager
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,763
    Quote Originally Posted by qdawgg
    I didn't realize until after I bought the kit that it isn't just a throw away kit, now that I have it I should be able to use it quite a bit before I need another one.
    Yeah, definitely not a throwaway! You can always use good old automotive or motorcycle DOT 3, 4, or 5.1 fluid when the bottle that comes with the kit is empty.

    I used about half of what they provided the first time I bled my brakes. Being a car geek as well, there's always some DOT 4 or 5.1 fluid around the garage, so I'm set for a while.
    Work is the curse of the biking classes.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chomxxo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    784
    My Juicy Ultimates came with a very poor bleed, both front and back. I had to order a bleed kit immediately. That I found irritating.

    The SRAM/Avid bleed video is excellent (well not so much the one with the "surfer dude"). It was a little daunting to figure out the process at first; I wanted it to be perfect the first time. It was easier to perform once I'd reviewed the video several times. I brought my laptop out to the shop and paused it after each step.

    Make sure you wear rubber gloves and rinse the bike with water ASAP!

    Excellent bleed now with good modulation; I hit 35+ mph on a downhill every day with them.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: qdawgg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    703
    Quote Originally Posted by chomxxo
    My Juicy Ultimates came with a very poor bleed, both front and back. I had to order a bleed kit immediately. That I found irritating.

    The SRAM/Avid bleed video is excellent (well not so much the one with the "surfer dude"). It was a little daunting to figure out the process at first; I wanted it to be perfect the first time. It was easier to perform once I'd reviewed the video several times. I brought my laptop out to the shop and paused it after each step.

    Make sure you wear rubber gloves and rinse the bike with water ASAP!

    Excellent bleed now with good modulation; I hit 35+ mph on a downhill every day with them.
    --> I did the exact same thing, brought the labtop to my bike and paused at each "section" to make sure I was doing it right. Thank god for youtube and people posting the videos on there.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bowhuntmaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    236
    Quote Originally Posted by qdawgg
    --> I did the exact same thing, brought the labtop to my bike and paused at each "section" to make sure I was doing it right. Thank god for youtube and people posting the videos on there.
    So if a cop can have a laptop mount in his car, when are they going to make a laptop mount for your bike hanger/repair stand.
    Trek Fuel EX8
    Full XT cockpit
    Thompson X4 Elite Stem
    Easton Haven Carbon Handlebars / Seatpost

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: xmangox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    502
    Quote Originally Posted by Bowhuntmaster
    So if a cop can have a laptop mount in his car, when are they going to make a laptop mount for your bike hanger/repair stand.

    Uhh I just have my laptop hooked up to the LCD tv in my shop, bike stand is under it. Simple enough to follow along.

  19. #19
    Token Hillbilly
    Reputation: J. Fragera's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    726
    Quote Originally Posted by chomxxo
    Make sure you wear rubber gloves and rinse the bike with water ASAP!
    QFT - I've been around and worked on cars most of my life. I have seen brake fluid lift/ruin paint. It's a good idea to have a shop towel over the surrounding areas when dealing with brake fluid and a nice paint job.
    Trying to win hearts and minds, but willing to stomp them if necessary.

  20. #20
    discombobulated SuperModerator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3,131
    I did it a couple times. I never got it quite right. When hung upside down a bubble develops. a few hours right side up an the brakes are fine. Maybe I have a leak or something

  21. #21
    Transition Blindside v5
    Reputation: PiroChu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    992

    New question here. reach adjuster setting for bleeding

    Quote Originally Posted by qdawgg
    I had adjusted the screws so that the levers were "pushed out" away from the handlebars as far as possible. Do I want to keep the adjustment like this when I bleed the brakes or do I want to adjust the screw so I am moving the brake lever back closer to the handlebars?
    Quote Originally Posted by chucko58
    Yeah, "pushed out" is right. The main thing is being able to bottom the master cylinder before the lever hits the bar.
    Thanks for this Q&A, as this is the one thing I still couldn't understand from reading online manuals & watching two SRAMtech videos on YouTube.

    So, good to know that it's to set the lever blade "away" from the handlebar.

    From reading/watching videos, it didn't necessarily sound like one must do so completely all the way out, though? The guy in this video at 1:56~2:08 said "a few millimeters or threads". Does that mean "a few millimeters/threads" of the adjuster-bolt tip sticking out (visible) of the lever blade?   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mg6NbIjmOM

    Thanks,
    - PiroChu

    PS.
    Just ordered the kit today, and will try it this weekend (my 1st time).
    Last edited by PiroChu; 05-19-2009 at 04:44 PM.
    __________________
    - PiroChu
    '11 Transition Blindside (v5)
    Northern California (Bay Area)

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    102
    Wat about brake pump expand? This is wat the mechanic told me. Bleed few times but the problem cant be solved. The lever just dun spring back the amt its being pulled. It looks like nothing push back the piston and the lever doesnt recoil back strong... Anyone encounter such problem? Can this problem be solved... I only use it for a month and even change the hose to goodridge... Now I have problem selling it away....
    I have change my brakes and this set of Avid is lying around.

  23. #23
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059
    On the issue of Avid bleeds and the video and/or written instructions, I think they miss a step that seems to help me. When both the lever syringe and the caliper syringe are open to each other, I find that just pumping the caliper syringe to fill the lever syringe seems to leave air in the caliper that their little vacuum method on the caliper syringe doesn't completely evacuate.

    If you truly need to flush the system, then by all means pump the new fluid from the caliper syringe into the lever syringe to clear the system of the old fluid. Then I recommend basically starting over with the syringes at the 1/2 and 1/4 levels with fresh fluid to continue the bleed. At the point where you fill the lever syringe to 1/2, I go ahead and draw fluid back and forth between the two syringes, ending with the lever syringe at the stated 1/2 full level. The air bubbles you get out of the caliper with this method seems a much more efficient way to get the air out rather than the recommended vaccum and pressure method at the caliper syringe in the instructions. I almost always have air in the caliper when I don't use the back and forth flow method during the exchange of fluid from the caliper syringe to the lever syringe. And frankly this recommended vacuum method with the lever syringe shut even sounds a bit counterproductive. Now this seems to work fine on the last step of evacuating air bubbles from the MC with the lever syringe. At least this is what I've observed.

    Running the air in the line back and forth a bit allows the air to migrate into the syringes during the caliper pumping step early in the process. You do have to pay more attention to keeping the syringes upright, so the air stays up near the plunger and not forced back into the line.

    Anyone else notice anything like this?...or have a similar method?

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    135
    I find the same with my K24s (same bleed procedure). Pushing fluid back and forth 5-6 times always gets rid of some air left after the vacuum step. I tend to push all the old fluid out from bottom to top, then refill the caliper syringe with fresh oil and flush.

    I find gently tapping the caliper with the handle of a screwdriver also helps free up any air bubbles.

    Plus if you create too much of a vacuum by pulling too hard on the caliper syringe plunger, I find air gets sucked in past the caliper seals and ruins the bleed.

  25. #25
    Transition Blindside v5
    Reputation: PiroChu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    992

    New question here. DOT dripped on rotor - how to clean?

    So, I just did it - my first bleeding. While watching the videos on laptop in garage, I took the steps carefully to bleed my rear brake, and it went fine. (Since it was just my first try, I didn't do the "back-and-forth" suggested by TNC this time. Maybe from next time...)

    I fully wrapped the rear caliper carefully so that DOT fluid won't drip onto pads. However, I didn't think to do the same with the front caliper (since I was just bleeding my problematic rear brake), and DOT fluid from the lever side tripped onto the rotor (but luckily not the pads - hopefully!) - doh!

    I wiped the rotor with a lot of rubbing alcohol. Not sure that's sufficient? I guess I'll have to go out on a ride to find out if it'll start sounding like a freight train...

    Any tips on fully cleaning the rotor (or pads) that received DOT-fluid dripping?

    Thanks for your feedback in advance,
    - PiroChu

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •