Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    232

    best modulating hydraulics

    Ive decided to upgrade my avid BB7s to some hydros after having to stop and readjust my pads 3 or 4 times on a long (4000ft) wet downhill. I love the feel of the bb7s when they are set up right and in the dry, but they dont seem to work nearly as well in the wet, I have a 29er with 180/160 rotors and speed dial levers and weigh 190. I want to find hydros that dont feel grabby like many that I have tried but rather have a nice smooth power ramp up. Ultimate power is less of a concern as I am primarily an XC rider and dont have power issues. Light weight is good (I race) and I dont want to break the bank. Longer lever blades would be nice as well as I use gripshifts and find the speed dial levers a little too short for my liking. My current top prospect is Avid Elixr CRs but im also considering shimano XTs. The formulas/hopes/maguras are nice but alot more money) What does everyone here suggest?
    thanks

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,980
    I rode a Cannondale Rize 1 that had the XTR brake set up. I had more of a gradual "feel" that I think you are talking about. I didnt particularly like it that much, but other do.

    I like that "feel" a little on the front, but solid on the back. So, I run Formula K18 with 180 rotor and organic pads on the front, and 160 rotor with sintered pads on the back.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: oldskoolbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    1,600
    Shimano brakes modulate very well. So XT or SLX would be good choices.

  4. #4
    Off the back...
    Reputation: pinkrobe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,957
    Quote Originally Posted by oldskoolbiker
    Shimano brakes modulate very well. So XT or SLX would be good choices.
    +1 to that. Very progressive feel on both models.

  5. #5
    *****************
    Reputation: Bikinfoolferlife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    12,379
    I'm a long time BB7 user (and will continue to be, too) that recently got a set of the Elixir CRs, they modulate well IMO. Better than other hydraulics I'd tried in the past (it'd been a while, though).
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  6. #6
    I think I need to Upgrade
    Reputation: AzSpeedfreek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,621
    Hope and Shimano have very good modulation, but it is best that you try them for your self and decide what will work the best for you and your needs.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    322
    Why would you want to modulate braking power?
    You either need to slow down or you need to not slow down...
    someone explain!!

  8. #8
    himom!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    684
    Quote Originally Posted by OuterNational
    Why would you want to modulate braking power?
    You either need to slow down or you need to not slow down...
    someone explain!!
    Sometimes you only need to slow only a little bit. You would agree that a brake that goes from no power to flip-over-the-bars-power immediately is bad, right?

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    15
    I recommend making sure your brake pads are not organic. after all, it's only when you ride in the wet that your brakes lack the feel you need. if they are organic, get some sintered pads, or metalized pads, which are a little more noisy, but stop in the rain just as well as in the dry. just a thought. avid calls their two pads, organic and sintered; shimano call them resin, or metal: it's all the same every company makes two kinds...one for wet weather, and one that's quiet. wet weather/ sintered/meatl pads last way longer as well.
    just my thoughts...

  10. #10
    Flaccid Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    8,042
    Did you read the brake reviews? Try it.

  11. #11
    Weekend Warrior
    Reputation: daleksic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,078
    I have BB7s and I had nothing but troubles with the Organic pads, but I also have the roundagon rotors, which is probably the worst BB7 setup you can have.

    First thing, if you downhill, bigger rotors are a must. Also get rid of the Organic crap, go metallic, sintered or even ceramic. I have 185's in the front and 160's in the rear. I drilled out my roundagons to better clear the debris out.

    My current setup is, drilled roundagons, metallic pads, 185/160. I can't feel the difference between wet or dry braking, i do however hear more noise especially when crap gets lodged in the pads, but due to my drilled roundagons it takes now around 100 feet or so to clear out.

    Another thing i noticed are the right cables. I was kicking and screaming first to get heavier cables (I run Full Metal Jackets), but there is virtually no cable stretch, so the harder you pull the more power goes to the calipers. With my old cables i was able to reach my grips when it was wet and when it was dry it put my over the bars. So no consistent power with cheap cables.

    Hydros are great but just last weekend someone in my group crashed and the front caliper was stuck in the full on position, there was no fixing it on the trail, had to leave to the LBS. Mech's are easier to (quick) fix and maintain.

    Whichever way you go though you'll probably make the right decision

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rabidchicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    811
    i just went through all the research of reading the reviews and price comparison. My budget included Avid Elixir Rs, Hayes Carbon Strokers, and Shimano SLX. Just from what I have read the SLX are the best bang for the buck. Blue Sky says they will be here Friday!

    They are still on sale for $100 each http://www.blueskycycling.com/produc..._Brake_Set.htm

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    68
    I have to second the vote for the SLX brakes. A friend of mine who owns the bike shop I mostly buy from told me Shimano hydraulics are the most hassle free setup and he ended up getting the same brakes. Also the lever adjust it has is very useful. If you have the extra cash maybe go XTů

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: two-one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    503
    I've got the stroker carbons, and I love them... started with some squealing issues, but that was because I had to get used to the proper maintenance....
    Went on a few marathons recently in the Belgian Ardennes, and they were absolutely awesome! When I was home, I noticed a pretty big bend in the front disc that must have been caused by a fall on some rocks early on. However, I never noticed anything about it!
    I will admit I don't have much experience with other discbrakes, but nevertheless... pretty great (saw them cheap on ebay recently too)

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    98
    You can't go wrong with the Elixir CRs. I have been running them since they came out. I hade Juicy 7s and the Elixirs are way better than the Juicy's. I hear good things about the Elixir R's also.
    Don't aim for success if you want it; just do what you love and believe in, and it will come naturally.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,883
    Quote Originally Posted by speedraceratl
    You can't go wrong with the Elixir CRs. I have been running them since they came out. I hade Juicy 7s and the Elixirs are way better than the Juicy's. I hear good things about the Elixir R's also.
    And you never had problems with "shrieks, howls or hmmmmmmmmmm" like I have? If only my Elixir Rs worked like yours from the beginning. My front Elixir is silent, my rear Elixir is a piece of work...loud work. Lucky you. If I ignore the noise they are solid stoppers. What bike are yours on?
    A blind man searches in a dark room for a black hat that isn't there. Dashiell Hammett

  17. #17
    My other ride is your mom
    Reputation: Maadjurguer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    4,448
    I've ridden Hayes, Avid Juicy's and SLX. SLX and Hayes have great modulation.....Juicy's not so much. I believe that the Elixir's modulate better than the Juicy's....but I'll let others chime in if it's better than Hayes and Shimano.

    IMO....Shimano modulates the best, with Hayes a close second.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,256
    Really this comes down to preference - what one person says has great modulation others can call a weak brake.

    Personally I am a huge fan of the Magura product, found Hayes stuff to be ok, Avid to be slightly better then Hayes, but did not get along well with Shimano or Hope stuff at all.

  19. #19
    Stay thirsty my friends
    Reputation: 4JawChuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    887
    Elixirs are the best hands down for modulation...I tried all the others...no way you can convince me otherwise. They have equal power to most of the others and all from a double piston, I thought the Saints were going to be the hot ticket until I tried the Elixirs.

    If you have problems with them squeeling (my front one did) use a smear of silicone on the back to glue the pad to the piston...problem solved...it seems to be related to pad clearance differences in the slot where they ride. Production tolerances vary hence why some people have the issue and others do not, my back ones have never made a sound. Now all I need are some stainless steel braided lines to go with them and they will be perfect.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •