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Thread: bedding pads

  1. #1
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    bedding pads

    Most are advising braking down a steep hill a half dozen times to bed pads. I read somewhere that that can glaze the pads and warp the rotors. Im assuming this is a worst case scenario and only if you really reef on the levers. What is the best way to bed pads?

    Thanks.

    PS - I did a search, but all threads were like 3 years old and none covered this question exactly.

  2. #2
    Huckin' trails
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbatl11 View Post
    Most are advising braking down a steep hill a half dozen times to bed pads. I read somewhere that that can glaze the pads and warp the rotors. Im assuming this is a worst case scenario and only if you really reef on the levers. What is the best way to bed pads?

    Thanks.

    PS - I did a search, but all threads were like 3 years old and none covered this question exactly.
    FWIW, when installing my disc brakes, I was no where near any hill. Flat ground all the way for miles.

    So I made sure they were perfectly aligned and no bend in the rotor, and I went riding down the street, coming back and forth, reaching about 15m/h then slowly applying the brakes, then sometimes a bit harder, pretty much random force, till one time I slowly applied them and they felt like a good bite in the rotor. Brakes were BB7 MTN with stock pads, and took about 40 complete stops to achieve full bed-in. Then the next day for a ride, the brakes were doing great. After that, I took out the pads, clean them dry with a paper towel, then with some gasoline (I had no alcohol on hand that day), then wipe them dry again, dry wipe the rotor, then put everything back in. Make sure it's all aligned and you're good. I've cleaned them simply to remove that first dirt coat that the bed-in makes. Then no noise and great stopping power. Your milage may vary.
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  3. #3
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    I usually ride pretty much how I always ride when braking in new pads, just a little more cautious since my stopping distance isn't as good. I've tried the hill repeats method, but I can't say it felt like the pads broke in any sooner.
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  4. #4
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    This is what SRAM's technical manual has to say on the bedding process:

    All new brake pads and rotors should be put through a wear-in process called ‘bed-in’. The bed-in procedure, which should be performed prior to your first ride, ensures the most consistent and powerful braking feel along with the quietest braking in most riding conditions. The bed-in process heats up the brake pads and rotors which deposits an even layer of brake pad material (transfer layer) to the braking surface of the rotor. It this transfer layer that optimizes braking performance.

    1) Accelerate the bike to a moderate speed, then firmly apply the brakes until you are at walking speed. Repeat approximately twenty times.

    2) Accelerate the bike to a faster speed. Then very firmly apply the brakes until you are at walking speed. Repeat approximately ten times.

    Do not lock up the wheels at any point during the bed-in procedure.

    3 Allow the brakes to cool prior to any additional riding.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtyjack View Post
    This is what SRAM's technical manual has to say on the bedding process:

    All new brake pads and rotors should be put through a wear-in process called ‘bed-in’. The bed-in procedure, which should be performed prior to your first ride, ensures the most consistent and powerful braking feel along with the quietest braking in most riding conditions. The bed-in process heats up the brake pads and rotors which deposits an even layer of brake pad material (transfer layer) to the braking surface of the rotor. It this transfer layer that optimizes braking performance.

    1) Accelerate the bike to a moderate speed, then firmly apply the brakes until you are at walking speed. Repeat approximately twenty times.

    2) Accelerate the bike to a faster speed. Then very firmly apply the brakes until you are at walking speed. Repeat approximately ten times.

    Do not lock up the wheels at any point during the bed-in procedure.

    3 Allow the brakes to cool prior to any additional riding.

    This is the exact boring procedure I followed with my new XO's. Looked and felt really stupid riding back and forth down the street in front of my house for a half hour coming to controlled stops from different speeds, but it works. Dont skimp......it actually does take 40 or more stops to seat them. You will know when it happens. The lever feels perfect, and the brakes start performing as you hoped they would.

  6. #6
    Diggity Dog
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    Burning in the Rotors/Pads AKA Bedding In

    Burning in the brake system leaves some pad material on the rotors. You should burn the system in when installing either new rotors, pads or both. You can do it on the flat. Suggested to use one brake at a time. Get up to speed and apply front or rear brake until it slows you down but do not come to a stop. Do this about 10 times each brake and you should feel the power increase significantly.

    If you need to clean the rotors with a solvent it is suggested to use isopropyl alcohol. I usually just use a clean rag and water.

  7. #7
    dude with orange car
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    I install new pads when my old pads wear out, which is almost always mid-ride. So the "bedding in" process for me is just the first part of my ride continuation. By no means is this the "best" way to do it, but I'm not dead yet, so I guess it works ok.

    I'm also hugely grateful that bicycle disc brake technology no longer uses those damn shims I had in my Shimano m755 brakes - that was a huge pain in the ass trailside.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbatl11 View Post
    Most are advising braking down a steep hill a half dozen times to bed pads. I read somewhere that that can glaze the pads and warp the rotors. Im assuming this is a worst case scenario and only if you really reef on the levers. What is the best way to bed pads?

    Thanks.

    PS - I did a search, but all threads were like 3 years old and none covered this question exactly.
    I am lucky...I live at the top of a steep hill maybe 100 vertical feet....

    I just ride down the hill speeding up and down....

    By the bottom the brakes are noticabley better......whether new pads/or sanded/cleaned pads...

    Takes about 2 minutes.

    They do continue to improve with every hill for most of the first ride or so.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    I am lucky...I live at the top of a steep hill maybe 100 vertical feet....

    I just ride down the hill speeding up and down....

    By the bottom the brakes are noticabley better......whether new pads/or sanded/cleaned pads...

    Takes about 2 minutes.

    They do continue to improve with every hill for most of the first ride or so.
    No shortage of hills here in GA. Thanks all.

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