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  1. #1
    007
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    Bedding in new Rotors

    I did a search and couldn't find a unified thread . . . .

    I'm wondering what procedures you all use for bedding in new pads & rotors. I know that this is essential for new brakes, but there are several ways to do it . . . i.e. bomb down a hill and slow to a near stop - but do not stop completely - rinse repeat. Is that the crux of it?

    So, what do you do to break in new pads and rotors?

  2. #2
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    Yeah I did that like twice and got lazy. Just kept riding normally and now they're perfect.

  3. #3
    Underskilled
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    just don't ride them in the mud until bedded in.

    sprints to 20mph and brake hard to stop work,
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  4. #4
    bi-winning
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    Just a little bit of sprint, slow down, and repeat.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  5. #5
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    I just go ride. Muddy rides are even better because everything breaks in real fast.
    "It looks flexy"

  6. #6
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    Out the door down the hill and everything is fine.

  7. #7
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    Do not stop of course....

    that just puts extra material on the rotor in a single spot and will set up a pulse in the brakes.

    My favorite method is to find a hill, preferably paved, that will allow an easy run up to 20 mph at least once. This can be done on a flat, but it takes allot more energy. Once up to 20 brake firmly down two 10. An ideal hill will let you hit 20 and brake down about twice before you hit bottom. If the hill you find is longer don't run the cycle more than 3 times to prevent excessive heat build up. Once at the bottom, let the brakes cool for a few minutes or let them cool on the climb back up. You don't what to brake "hard", too much heat build up and you'll glaze the pads. Just a firm application of the brakes is all that is needed. If the hill is too steep you'll have to use too much brake and build too much heat. If you glaze em, you'll have to sand them down to break the glaze and start over. Run the hill between 6 and 10 times. The brakes won't be 100% bedded, that takes a little longer, but they'll be close and suitable to hit the trail with in any conditions. From there, normal riding will finish the job in a few good rides.

    The idea of bedding the pads is pretty simple. It does two things, a) removes any slight imperfections in the pad surface and flattens them out to match the surface of the rotor. b) it burnishes the surface of the rotor and deposits a small amount of pad material thereon. This serves to smooth both surfaces and greatly improves bite as the brakes are applied.

    Anyway, whatever method you choose, hill runs, flat runs, or simply just going out and riding, remember to take it easy. Brake firmly not hard, don't stop with the rotors heated up unless absolutely necessary, avoid heavy traffic areas, and make it fun!

    Oh, and a good place to look for is a side road that overpasses a highway. Look for a sidewalk on one side or the other of the overpass. Unless the overpass is in a heavily populated area they're usually ideal. No exit or entrance ramps to the side road, lightly used sidewalk and a good run outs at either end. You can ride up one side, make your run down the other, then turn around and repeat.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  8. #8
    Rub it............
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    Squash has it.

    I can't emphasize enough about following Squash's advise. I did what he said several years ago setting up my BB7's, and I've had 3 years of absolute great performance out of them. Did the same procedure with my Juicy's over the winter, and they have been problem free.

  9. #9
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    Same as bedding in your car brakes. Accelerate to a moderate speed, gentle braking and do not over heat. Repeat a few times and enjoy. Hills are useful, but not necessary. You have legs, use'm

  10. #10
    007
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    Next question . . . how do you tell if the brakes are overheating? Same as in a car (e.g., brake fade)?

  11. #11
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    Also, contrary to what Squash says, I learned that riding all the way down the Whistler Bike Park with new pads and rotors will break things in a hurry - like halfway down.
    "It looks flexy"

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