Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    My cup runneth over
    Reputation: rmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    2,118

    BB7s squealing when climbing

    Sorry if this is a repeat – couldn’t find anything on the forum.
    Under hard pedaling climbing my rear BB7 squeals loudly. The harder the pedaling the louder the squeal. I am fairly sure it’s the (rear) brake because I can reduce the squeal by engaging the brake (perfect solution when climbing hard…)
    It seems like an adjustment –any recommendations?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Simpledesign's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    444
    check your QR in the back and make sure you lined your rear wheel up straight. Happened to me with a different brand but found the extra torque to move the wheel and disk enough to cause it to squeak.
    '12 Trek Marlin Signature Green
    '13 Santa Cruz Tallboy LT Gulf Blue/Orange

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by rmac View Post
    Sorry if this is a repeat – couldn’t find anything on the forum.
    Under hard pedaling climbing my rear BB7 squeals loudly. The harder the pedaling the louder the squeal. I am fairly sure it’s the (rear) brake because I can reduce the squeal by engaging the brake (perfect solution when climbing hard…)
    It seems like an adjustment –any recommendations?
    Thanks.
    Is the bike a hard tail or full suspension? Has any work been done to the bike before it happened, or have you had a bad wreck lately?

    It sounds like you have something loose or damaged that is causing the rubbing under heavy load such as climbing. I would go over all the bolts on the brakes (make sure to check the rotors as well) making sure they are tight, also check the brake cables, housing, and levers for any damage, loose parts etc. Lastly check the rear wheel make sure it is tight, you may even want to pull the wheel off and check the pads. If you do find anything loose, I go through and redo the alignment/setup on the rear brake.

    Worse case turn the bike upside down and yank on the rear triangle and check for excessive flex, from either frame damage or a loose swing arm.

  4. #4
    no trees are safe
    Reputation: Millfox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    491
    It happened to me when I had my Quick release bent. Replaced it and the squeaking went away. Did you setup your brake calipers lately?

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Pollution Warrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    385
    I'd take the pads out and bend the retainer clip/spring thing some to make sure the pads are kept away from the disc except for under braking. It may be getting weak and letting the pad rub the disc. Playing with the QR and adjusting the brakes may help too.

  6. #6
    My cup runneth over
    Reputation: rmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    2,118
    Thanks for the suggestions. I will check the skewer (not a QR).

    This is on a Fatback geared rigid - big tires, v wide hubs/long skewer.

    Very odd only to squeal on climbs when cranking.

  7. #7
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
    Reputation: thomllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,148
    Quote Originally Posted by rmac View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions. I will check the skewer (not a QR).

    This is on a Fatback geared rigid - big tires, v wide hubs/long skewer.

    Very odd only to squeal on climbs when cranking.
    check your Axle and Hub, make sure the bearings aren't loose. Particularly if it's a loose bearing style hub.
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    13,178
    Quote Originally Posted by rmac View Post

    Very odd only to squeal on climbs when cranking.
    Not really. You flex the rear end slightly when you are cranking on the pedals. If the rotor is close to rubbing, that can be enough to make it rub.

    I find it is really important to weight the rear wheel in the dropouts before tightening it, and especially before you set up the brakes. This way, the wheel ends up in the same position every time.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  9. #9
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
    Reputation: thomllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,148
    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    Not really. You flex the rear end slightly when you are cranking on the pedals. If the rotor is close to rubbing, that can be enough to make it rub.

    I find it is really important to weight the rear wheel in the dropouts before tightening it, and especially before you set up the brakes. This way, the wheel ends up in the same position every time.
    100% agree.. can't tell ya how many time I hear people complain about rubbing, or the dreaded front wheel squeal from having to take it off when transporting... just add weight before locking down and it'll sit the same every time (unless something is broken or have bad bearings)
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •