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  1. #1
    Quiet Professional
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    BB7 or entry hydro? Tektro?

    So I have been looking at bb7's for a while as I have been using mech discs for years, but a friend offered a pair of tektro hydros that came off his bike for 50.00 for the set. I am wondering if a skuffed pair of hydros would be better than the bb7. What would other options be as good as the bb7?

  2. #2
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    Any of the new shimano brakes are dialed. If for whatever reason you can't do a Shimano run a BB7. I say this as a career mechanic.

  3. #3
    Norđwegr
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    What kind of Tektros?
    I've had a set on my Cannondale bike for 4 years now and I've never had to adjust or bleed them.
    That being said I don't know how easy or hard it would be to do so on them.

    BB7s are easier to maintain in any case.

  4. #4
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    I prefer hydros over mechanical they need less maintenance and are more reliable (if well cared)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CRchris1996 View Post
    I prefer hydros over mechanical they need less maintenance and are more reliable (if well cared)
    Way to contradict yourself... If you spend all your time maintaining them, they won't need maintenance.

    Unless you are riding really hard stuff where you need the last 5-10% of braking power and modulation, go with the BB7's. set em and forget them. If things do go downhill on the trail you have a better chance of a field repair with a cable than with a hydraulic line.

    other rider: Hey man you OK?

    you: no I've got a problem
    other rider (to his buddies): hold up! (to you) what can we help you with?

    you: thanks guys, you wouldn't happen to have hydraulic hose, mineral oil, bleed kit, proprietary compression fittings, a dremel, and 30 minutes would you?

    other rider: uhhhhh... I got an iphone so you can call someone to tell em how screwed you are...

  6. #6
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    Total brake failure tends to be uncommon. To be fair though, if reliability/repair-ability is a concern (as in touring applications) then, yes, cable brakes are the way to go. Otherwise, use hydraulic brakes, as they offer better braking power for less lever force.

    Now, that said, entry level Tektro hydraulic brakes are still not that good. The BB7s will likely serve you better, especially with the Single Digit 7 levers.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjduct View Post
    Way to contradict yourself... If you spend all your time maintaining them, they won't need maintenance.

    Unless you are riding really hard stuff where you need the last 5-10% of braking power and modulation, go with the BB7's. set em and forget them. If things do go downhill on the trail you have a better chance of a field repair with a cable than with a hydraulic line.

    other rider: Hey man you OK?

    you: no I've got a problem
    other rider (to his buddies): hold up! (to you) what can we help you with?

    you: thanks guys, you wouldn't happen to have hydraulic hose, mineral oil, bleed kit, proprietary compression fittings, a dremel, and 30 minutes would you?

    other rider: uhhhhh... I got an iphone so you can call someone to tell em how screwed you are...
    I wasn't saying that and well the last thing that I said is unnecessary because everything that is well cared will be more reliable.
    My point was that with hydros is easier to adjust them just turn a screw and other things like that and they didnt have the problem with cables and dont loose the adjustment.
    for that situation how many brake cables do you carry...?

  8. #8
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    I kinda like entry Tektros, the issue I found is the stock pads are crap. I bought some Deore M525/Tektro Auriga pads from "Bikefridge" on ebay and they really made my brakes better. With that said, they are not as strong as my mid-level Shimanos.

  9. #9
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    My Tektro Auriga's on my $800 Merida hardtail are way better than the Elixir 5's on my $3000 Aurum.

    I replaced the stock pads with Shimano pads as well, as the rear didn't bed in properly, and now they're great, and they're a lot cheaper than Shimano if budget is a concern.

    If you have enough money though, go Shimano, it's what I'll probably end up doing on the Aurum..

  10. #10
    DFMBA.org
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    My Tektro Dracos have been awesome. Replace the pads once/yr and theyve worked flawlessly in my dusty AZ conditions. Quiet too.
    Please donate to IMBA or your local IMBA chapter. It's trail karma.

  11. #11
    Vitamin Bike Added
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    my bb7s keep me happy. Plenty strong and easy to tune
    Keep the rubber side down

  12. #12
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    funny

    Quote Originally Posted by mjduct View Post
    Way to contradict yourself... If you spend all your time maintaining them, they won't need maintenance.

    Unless you are riding really hard stuff where you need the last 5-10% of braking power and modulation, go with the BB7's. set em and forget them. If things do go downhill on the trail you have a better chance of a field repair with a cable than with a hydraulic line.

    other rider: Hey man you OK?

    you: no I've got a problem
    other rider (to his buddies): hold up! (to you) what can we help you with?

    you: thanks guys, you wouldn't happen to have hydraulic hose, mineral oil, bleed kit, proprietary compression fittings, a dremel, and 30 minutes would you?

    other rider: uhhhhh... I got an iphone so you can call someone to tell em how screwed you are...
    That's funny stuff!

  13. #13
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    @mjduct

    If you pay ZERO attention to your hydraulics, don't cry mommy when they crap out on you on the trail. Brakes don't just fail. I suppose the same thing could be said about forks and rear shocks. Do you carry spare seals, bushings, oil, springs, spare lowers out to the trail?

    dat dere buttery smooth, effortless lever pull is what had me switch over to hydraulics.

  14. #14
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    +1 for BB7s

    Avid BB7s are easy to adjust and maintain. I have BB7s on three different bikes. Each bike is set-up with 185 front/160 rear roundagon rotors. After four years of year round mountain, road and daily commuting I have only one complaint, the stock brake pads are noticeably inconsistent.

    My recommended set-up for great power and modulation:
    185 Front/160 Rear Rotor
    Jagwire (or equivalent) full length cables
    EBC Gold brake pads

    NOTE:You may want to stay with 160 front rotor if your under 180lbs.

  15. #15
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    I would go with BB7's

    Easy to adjust and dependable.
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    Like life…the trail is unpredictable...

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jag Brah View Post
    @mjduct

    If you pay ZERO attention to your hydraulics, don't cry mommy when they crap out on you on the trail. Brakes don't just fail. I suppose the same thing could be said about forks and rear shocks. Do you carry spare seals, bushings, oil, springs, spare lowers out to the trail?

    dat dere buttery smooth, effortless lever pull is what had me switch over to hydraulics.
    thats what I was talking about

  17. #17
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    BB7's are great brakes. Even better with SD7 levers. Can adjust both sides making them easy to dial in. Modulation is fine.
    A couple of questions.
    How/Where do you ride?
    Can you afford the BB7's?
    Why is he getting rid of the Textros?

    I know nothing about tektros other than they're cheap. I own several disc brake bikes that run anything from BB& to Elixir CR to XO's to Hope. For how and where I ride they all perform flawlessly. I also have several with Cantis and V's and they wotk fine with good pads
    Seeking MB-2 Fork (19.3), Ritchey FD post silver 26.8

  18. #18
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    I have used many different brakes by many different brands. I have found that the Tektro Auriga have been some of the best performing brakes I have used once you get better pads. Easy to bleed if ever needed as well.

  19. #19
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    Shimano SLX hydros with fins are wonderful and would be my absolute first choice. After 15 months with a set, I have had absolutely no problems. I run them pretty aggressively in steep Oregon terrain. I have not bleed them once, although I hear it's very easy to do so.

    I used to use BB7s. Am glad I don't anymore. They have power. Sure. But when their cables get nasty, so do they. The fact I am always dialing them in a bit more on a ride down a mountain bothers me too. For commuting, touring or a really don't give a @@@@ bike, they're great. Otherwise, get a shimano or hope hydro.. at least for the front. Stay away from AVID hydros though.

  20. #20
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    I've got a leatherman in my pack and I can make a functional brake for the front from my rear cable/housing if I break my front cable, w/Hydro's thats not possible without all the gear I listed previously. MY trails tend to get rough and I've got holes all the way through my jagwire ripcord housing from vines/ limestone whatever that I wouldn't want to see how that would effect hydro lines.

    I'm not saying there aren't benefits to Hydro's, If you ride your equipment hard or race and need the extra power or modulation they definitely have some advantages. But Hydro's, especially cheap ones do not have the ease of reliability and durability of BB7's.

    My next bike is going to be more of a "play in the park" ride than a "go on an adventure" ride so I'm considering some hydro's but If I trash them I'm only going to have to walk them a mile or two at the worst.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by trodaq View Post
    BB7's are great brakes. Even better with SD7 levers. Can adjust both sides making them easy to dial in. Modulation is fine.
    A couple of questions.
    How/Where do you ride?
    Can you afford the BB7's?
    Why is he getting rid of the Textros?

    I know nothing about tektros other than they're cheap. I own several disc brake bikes that run anything from BB& to Elixir CR to XO's to Hope. For how and where I ride they all perform flawlessly. I also have several with Cantis and V's and they wotk fine with good pads
    Ride central Texas. Yes i can afford them. Looking at brakes, jagwire ripcord, and spd7 levers. He is getting rid of the tektros because they were stock and he upgraded. New pads but he levers are scratched.

    Sent from my Transformer TF101 using Xparent Blue Tapatalk 2

  22. #22
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    BB7 or mid to high end hydro, do sell yourself short.

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