Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    78

    BB7 Adjustment Questions: Any BB7 Pro's out there?

    I recently upgraded to BB7 disc brakes on my 2005 Trek 6500. I noticed when I apply the brakes, the pads tend to make the rotors flex inward a small amount. Is this normal? Will it cause any problems? Does anyone have any detailed instructions of how to adjust these brakes?

    I can't seem to get it set up so the rotors don't flex without the brakes rubbing.

    Also, breaking at slower speeds the brakes tend to squeal like an old wet rim brake. Does this go away or is it something I have to get used to?

    Thanks for any help you can give me!

  2. #2
    iRonic
    Reputation: GlassTrain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    304
    I recently upgraded to disk brakes, period! (BB5)

    Since only one side actually moves, there will be some flex as that side pushes the disk against the other pad. So, the closer the stationary pad is to the disk (without actually rubbing the disk) the better, I would presume.

    As for the squeal, good luck. I'm still trying to figure that one out, as my front brakes are rather loud. I will say that when I removed the pads, I noticed that the stationary side was worn at the top and almost untouched at the bottom. I've tried just about everything I've read here (except for using alcohol and such) to no avail. It disappears at first, but comes back with a vengeance after a couple of hard stops.
    Ron

  3. #3
    trail addict
    Reputation: Uncle Six Pack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,856
    Quote Originally Posted by TheWaydown
    I recently upgraded to BB7 disc brakes on my 2005 Trek 6500. I noticed when I apply the brakes, the pads tend to make the rotors flex inward a small amount. Is this normal? Will it cause any problems? Does anyone have any detailed instructions of how to adjust these brakes?

    I can't seem to get it set up so the rotors don't flex without the brakes rubbing.

    Also, breaking at slower speeds the brakes tend to squeal like an old wet rim brake. Does this go away or is it something I have to get used to?

    Thanks for any help you can give me!
    Yeah, you want your inner pad about as close as possible without rubbing because it stays in place while the outer pad does the squeezing. Set inner pad first, then outer pad... Then check lever feel and finish fine tuning a couple of clicks to get the free-play amount you want. And yes, a small amount of rotor flex is normal, but as you dial them in more carefully, you will minimize it.

    Mine are pretty noisy when wet, but very quiet as long as they are dry. Better alignment might help. I have heard of a few different methods, but the one that works for me is to loosen the mounting bolts, squeeze the lever, have the caliper find where the rotor "wants" it to be centered, snug mounting bolts while still keeping brakes applied (this is what actually assures that the caliper is aligned-so pads contact rotor very flat), finish tightening bolts while making sure the mount doesn't move from its desired position, go back and re-check inner and outer pads.
    You better just go ahead and drop that seatpost down to the reflector... the trail gets pretty rough down there.

  4. #4
    *****************
    Reputation: Bikinfoolferlife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    12,378
    Quote Originally Posted by TheWaydown
    I recently upgraded to BB7 disc brakes on my 2005 Trek 6500. I noticed when I apply the brakes, the pads tend to make the rotors flex inward a small amount. Is this normal? Will it cause any problems? Does anyone have any detailed instructions of how to adjust these brakes?

    I can't seem to get it set up so the rotors don't flex without the brakes rubbing.

    Also, breaking at slower speeds the brakes tend to squeal like an old wet rim brake. Does this go away or is it something I have to get used to?

    Thanks for any help you can give me!
    Did you do the install without the Avid instructions or did a shop install them?

    These brakes are designed to have the rotor flex since one pad is stationary. You might want to check caliper alignment in regards to your slow speed squeal. I think Avid's instructions are good, Parktool.com's are also; there are SRAM videos on youtube.com as well if you're a video sort of person.

    What levers are you using with the brakes?
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,496
    The flex issue has already been addressed. As far as the squeeling there are a few things. First remove the pads, lightly sand them and clean them with alcohol. Then clean the rotors with alcohol. This should cure your squeeling. If you have the cheap roundagon rotors, ditch them for cleansweep G2 or G3 rotors. These rotors are lighter and usually quieter than the cheap roundagons.
    2012 On One Whippet 650b
    2012 Santa Cruz TRc 650b
    2014 On One Dirty Disco
    2010 Soma Groove
    1987 Haro RS1

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    78
    Okay, thanks for the advice guys. And yeah my shop installed them for me. I was messing with them when I got my bike back from the shop because both front and rear brakes were rubbing. I have always been impressed with my shops work so I was kind of confused as to why they would be rubbing after they installed them. The shop kind of squeezed me in because I was leaving for college and was trying to get my bike done before I left so maybe it was sort of a rushed job.

    I am using the stock Tektro levers that came with my bike. Also, I had my brakes put on the day I left for college and accidentally left the Avid manual behind.

  7. #7
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    151
    you need to get real familiar with maintainence on these brakes unless you like going to the LBS a few times a week, normal wear requires you dial in pads to compensate for wear, I really like BB7s but they certainly are not carefree, do your self a favor and buy some avid brake levers they are quite affordable and make a big difference in modulation, tektro is low end stuff..real low end and spring for some prem avid cable sets, your bb7s are very affordable and will last years so why not upgrade levers ect?

  8. #8
    *****************
    Reputation: Bikinfoolferlife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    12,378
    Quote Originally Posted by TheWaydown
    Okay, thanks for the advice guys. And yeah my shop installed them for me. I was messing with them when I got my bike back from the shop because both front and rear brakes were rubbing. I have always been impressed with my shops work so I was kind of confused as to why they would be rubbing after they installed them. The shop kind of squeezed me in because I was leaving for college and was trying to get my bike done before I left so maybe it was sort of a rushed job.

    I am using the stock Tektro levers that came with my bike. Also, I had my brakes put on the day I left for college and accidentally left the Avid manual behind.
    Doesn't mean the shop did it right. You might also check to see if your rotor needs a bit of truing. Review the instructions online if you left the manual behind...
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    78
    Okay so you think new levers will help me? Which do you suggest?

    When I picked the bike up from the shop I rode it in the shop parking lot. That is when I noticed the rubbing noise when the brakes were not applied and an extremely loud squealing when I applied them.

    The rubbing/scuffing noise of the calipers hitting the rotors only happened in one spot per revolution on both the front and back wheels. I'm assuming that means the rotors are at least somewhat warped. Is a little "warpage" acceptable if they are brand new? It's not really bad enough to see the warp or bend with your own eyes.

    If I were to loosen the mounting bolts, and apply the brake to center the caliper on the rotor, should I do anything with the brake pad adjustment knobs before doing it that way? What I mean is should I have both knobs adjusted in the complete "out" positions or the complete "in" positions before loosening the mounting bolts and squeezing the brake lever to center the caliper?

    Thank you guys. I apologize for asking stupid questions. I'm just kind of getting in to the mechanical aspects of biking.

  10. #10
    *****************
    Reputation: Bikinfoolferlife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    12,378
    Quote Originally Posted by TheWaydown
    Okay so you think new levers will help me? Which do you suggest?

    When I picked the bike up from the shop I rode it in the shop parking lot. That is when I noticed the rubbing noise when the brakes were not applied and an extremely loud squealing when I applied them.

    The rubbing/scuffing noise of the calipers hitting the rotors only happened in one spot per revolution on both the front and back wheels. I'm assuming that means the rotors are at least somewhat warped. Is a little "warpage" acceptable if they are brand new? It's not really bad enough to see the warp or bend with your own eyes.

    If I were to loosen the mounting bolts, and apply the brake to center the caliper on the rotor, should I do anything with the brake pad adjustment knobs before doing it that way? What I mean is should I have both knobs adjusted in the complete "out" positions or the complete "in" positions before loosening the mounting bolts and squeezing the brake lever to center the caliper?

    Thank you guys. I apologize for asking stupid questions. I'm just kind of getting in to the mechanical aspects of biking.
    Does sound like you might have a little truing to do on your rotors, which would be good before tweaking anything else. Not encouraging, I know, but it is possible out of the box. Truing a rotor is simple, as long as you don't go extreme. Find a small, clean, adjustable wrench and opening the jaw just wide enough for the rotor use the caliper as a guide to bend back the high spot, a little at a time.

    The method of squeezing the brake is more of a way to do a hydraulic caliper setup and some mechanicals, but NOT the BB7 for best results. Just simply follow Avid's instructions, which it seems you haven't even read yet. I'd link but SRAM's website isn't responding at the moment. Don't even touch the calipers yet, first use your eyes first and see if there's any visual alignment problem in relation to your now, hopefully, trued rotor...

    Part of your noise issue could also simply be that your whole system needs some bedding in, particularly your pads to your rotors. Have you read the FAQ in the upper corner of this page?
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  11. #11
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    151
    I reccomend following all set according to Avid, your rotors should not be warped when new however maybe they are not torqued right.very complicated to explain how to set up these brakes on properly.they do need to break in properly and if they are not they will never work right.sounds like your mechanic is not so good.you want to be able to perform all maintainence on your BB7s?

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    344
    Honestly, these take less than 5 minutes to install and setup. I've never had a single issue. What I do is:

    Back the inner pad out all the way.
    Tighten the outer pad until the rotor won't turn anymore.
    Tighten the caliper positioning bolts alternating 1/4 turn at a time until tight.
    Back off the outer adjuster until the rotor turns free.

    It's literally that simple and works every time.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •