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  1. #1
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    avidy juicy 5 question

    ok, this is driving me crazy, should be simple. keep in mind this is my first set of disc brakes, so i know nothing. i've had these brakes for just a few weeks. the squeaking has stopped, and the stopping power is great, no problems there. but over the last few days, the lever for the rear brake has gotten more and more soft, it's almost at the end of its reach before it brakes.

    so is this what "reach adjustment" is referring to? it doesn't seem like it, but that's the only thing i can find besides pad adjustment. unfortunately, the guys at the bike shop i bought from suck, so i'm trying to figure this out on my own. thanks

  2. #2
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    sounds like you need a bleed. the reach adjustment is to bring the lever closer to the bar. usually for short fingers or just comfort

  3. #3
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    thanks for the reply. so is it normal to need a bleed after just a few weeks, or could that mean that something is not set up right?

  4. #4
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    It's possible that the brake had a air bubble in the reservoir and somehow made it's way down to the line or caliper. It also may be possible that there is a leak... check the fittings, along the hose, and around the pistons for any wetness.

    If these came new on a bike, take it back to the shop and have them bleed it.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    It's possible that the brake had a air bubble in the reservoir and somehow made it's way down to the line or caliper. It also may be possible that there is a leak... check the fittings, along the hose, and around the pistons for any wetness.

    If these came new on a bike, take it back to the shop and have them bleed it.
    The expert has spoken.

    Since they are new, my best guess is that an air bubble is causing the mushy feel at the lever, but don't ignore the possibility that your line has a leak. I had a similar problem and was quite certain that it was just a bubble, but it turned out that the line had a tiny leak in it. So inspect your brake line very carefully, and if you don't find anything, take it bake to the shop and have them bleed it properly. If you don't want to deal with the shop, you could order a bleed kit and try it yourself.

    Is is normal to need to bleed a new brake after a few weeks? No, but only if they were bled properly to begin with. Since you say that the guys at your LBS suck, it is a very real possibility that they didn't do the job right.

  6. #6
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    I also have a question about the Juicy 5's. I bled my juicy sevens a couple of days ago for the first time and it went great. I wanted to improve the lever feel so i adjusted the pad contact in a couple of turns. The lever movement is now a lot less than pre bleed. My question is what causes the excess lever movement and how do you get rid of it on juicy 5's. I bled my friends J5's today but the lever movement felt the same, the brakes were sharper but still more movement than he wanted.

    My theory was; if the system had slightly more fluid there would be less lever movement required to engage pad contact, is this correct? If so, did the adjustment on my pad contact on the J7's allow a bit more fluid to stay in the system?

    I have proved to myself i can bleed the system but feel i should really understand whats going on to get the best results

    cheers
    Broom Broom

  7. #7
    Meh.
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    You can overfill the system on the J5 to reduce lever travel. However, by doing this, the fluid may not have enough room to expand when it heats up. This would cause the pistons to extend.

    You can just remove the rotor from between the pads and pump out the pistons a little bit (stroke the levers). This will firm up the lever feel.

    Besides... having levers that pull closer to the bar gives you more power/control. It's all about ergonomics/biometrics.

  8. #8
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    thanks for the advice xsl_will. I read a previous thread about improving J7's and also read your comment about leaving enough room for expansion so hopefully i haven't over done it.

    I think it may just be preference, but i feel i get more control with my breaks using smaller lever movement. As mentioned ergonomics has a large factor, i have small hands so it makes a difference!

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