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  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Devastazione's Avatar
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    Avid X0 2012 quick help

    So far so good,my Avids X0 have been very good performers.
    The rear one has developed this issued tho : pads keep themselves way to close to disk and the wheel gets obviosuly quite slowed down. Should I work on the adjustments pins and screws on the lever or should I work on the clamp ? I've been trying to reset the clamp by unbolting and bolting it again but no success,the next step would be obviously unbolt the clamp and work directly on the pads...or it's not ?
    As a mere reference my bike has been sitting hidle for the past 3 months and there's still almost 2 months before I'll start riding it again,don't know if this idle time has been somehow detrimental to brake fluids.
    I've noticed this issue while routinely checking and testing the bike on the stand.

  2. #2
    Tool
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    After removing the caliper (clamp) and pads, you should be able to gently pry the pistons apart (use a small wrench or something that will press relatively flat and square against the pistons). Assuming your system is filled with the correct volume of brake fluid, the pistons should self-adjust aftrer reinstalling the caliper (the lever will feel mushy for the first pull or two, but will firm up as the pistons adjust).

    Make sure to not pull the brake lever when the rotor (or similarly sized solid object) is not between the pads - if this happens, the pistons will adjust to a narrower position and you will get rub. If the rear wheel has been off the bike at all, this may be what happened.

    If the pistons come right back to the too tight spot after this adjustment, you may have too much fluid in the system and will need a proper bleed. This isn't likely assuming your bike didn't have this problem from the start.

    The system is designed so that as the pads wear, the pistons will set themselves further out, allowing the brake lever to have consistent feel and power throughout the life of the pads. It's one way, though, so if they ever come out too far, you will have to manually push them back in. This is something that's required when you replace worn pads with new ones.

    Good luck,
    Pete
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

  3. #3
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    Right,worked out just fine. It has been a job more on the lever rather than on the caliper itself,I had to turn the barrell ( don't have the correct name in english,sorry) so that the pads sat a more distance from the disk. I'll see how things will develop with use.

  4. #4
    Tool
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    The controls on the lever do NOT affect the distance the pads sit from the rotor. The controls on the lever only affect where in the lever travel the pads begin to move, regardless of their starting position. More specifically, the lever 'pad contact adjust' will affect the point at which the lever begins to engage the piston within the lever that pressurizes the fluid in the system.

    The other control on the lever is the reach adjustment. This merely sets the resting position of the lever.

    If your pads are rubbing the rotor without the lever engaged, you will need to fix the problem at the caliper (unless it's the unlikely case of an over-filled system).
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

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