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  1. #1
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    Reputation: Bowhuntmaster's Avatar
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    Avid Juicy 5 brake rub... help!

    My front brake is rubbing a little on the outside pad. Is this adjustable. These brakes are brand new (new bike). They dont even have a quarter mile on them yet. Took a short parking lot ride when I got the bike home and noticed it after.
    Trek Fuel EX8
    Full XT cockpit
    Thompson X4 Elite Stem
    Easton Haven Carbon Handlebars / Seatpost

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Bowhuntmaster's Avatar
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    http://www.dirtragmag.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14747

    Found this. What do you think of the solutions on there?
    Trek Fuel EX8
    Full XT cockpit
    Thompson X4 Elite Stem
    Easton Haven Carbon Handlebars / Seatpost

  3. #3
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    Reputation: Vmax911's Avatar
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    The self centering method has worked for me in the past:

    loosen the two 5mm allen bolts that go down through the caliper into the mount a few turns, the spin the wheel, grab the brake, hold the brake and tighten the 5mm bolts evenly a little at a time. That will center the caliper.
    Also, I put a small amout of grease between the concave washer pairs and torque to spec.

  4. #4
    ...idios...
    Reputation: SteveUK's Avatar
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    Use a flat screwdriver to push the pads right back, then remove them. (If they won't push right back, this could indicate on over-filled system) At this point, ignore the CPS/tri-align method - as it depends upon both pistons moving at the same speed - and align the caliper by eye, taking your time to ensure that the rotor runs perfectly through the center of the caliper aperture. Once you're happy with the alignment, refit the pads and pull the brake lever until it feels firm; indicating that both pads are now pressing the rotor.

    Now go down to the caliper and eyeball the position of the pads relative to the rotor: do you have equal gap either side? No? With clean hands, push/pull (you'll need to use both hands) the rotor against the side which is closer to the rotor and keep it pressed there while somebody pulls the brake lever to push out the other piston/pad. Let go of the rotor and try the brake again. You're going to have to employ a little trial and error until you get the pads to sit at equal distances from the rotor, but the result will be properly operating pistons, and so a properly operating brake. As your brake is new, you may need to repeat the process a during/after a ride a two as new seals can sometimes hang on to a piston until they soften-up.

    See how you get on with that...
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    What luck for rulers, that men do not think - Adolf Hitler

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