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  1. #1
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    Avid Elixir R torque wrench really needed?

    Hey guys

    I am building up an old bike to something useable and I picked up a set of Avid Elixir R from eBay. I didn't get any instructions or anything but they are new.

    I read the manual on the net and it says that a torque wrench is needed. Is this right or just Avid being overly careful?

    It seems that many people have problems with their disc and I think this could be the problem. Has anyone installed their brakes with or without a torque wrench? Torque wrenches seem mighty expensive!

    Thanks

    Mike

  2. #2
    Fueled by Tigerblood
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    nah man, just dont go crazy and you'll be fine


    if its o carbon, have someone who has tightened stuff on carbon before

    but

    important thing

    on the lever clamp, its designed to have the top bolts tightened completly, and then tighten the bottom set of bolts as its just a regular shifter or something-till its tight.

    but be sure you do that...

    make sure the rotor bolts have some threadlock on them....

    good luck

    i love my elixir cr's

  3. #3
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    So go easy on the bolts. Make sure they have thread locks on the disc bolts and tighten the top bolt on the lever then tighten the bottom to stabilize it all?

  4. #4
    Fueled by Tigerblood
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    yep, tighten the top bolt on the lever till its tight, at which the lever will still be loose on th bar, but then tighten the bottom bolt as if it was a single bolt design.

    sram designed it that way so you can take off the lever without taking off the shifters and grips.

    and yes, threadlock on the rotor bolts is a must, but just like blue locktite, nothing crazy there as well

  5. #5
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    Yes a torque wrench...

    IS needed. The primary concern is the caliper mounting bolts. For the CPS washer stack proper torque is critical. To tight and the washers can take a set. This will make it very difficult to readjust caliper position later on. To little torque and the stack will not be stable and the calipers will shift position during use. You can get away with out it on the other bolts in the system. With any other bolts related to the caliper, i.e. adapter mounting bolts (if used) it's just good insurance. I've been wrenching bikes both DIY and as a professional mechanic for 15 years, and I still use a torque wrench on brakes, stems, bottom brackets and cranks. These are rider interface, and/or safety items. Having them tight but without stripping or damaging fastener threads, or without them coming loose during use is very important.

    Your call. You can get away without using a torque wrench. But the result of over or under torquing your brakes can be very annoying at the least, expensive in some cases should you strip threads, or down right dangerous if not tight enough. Personally, I don't have a calibrated click type forearm, so I use a torque wrench.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  6. #6
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    Its just the price of the wrenches that kills me. They are crazy expensive.

  7. #7
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    Beam type torque wrenches are relatively inexpensive and work well. A good buy IMO especially if you do most of your own work or have many bikes.

    I have two, one for larger parts (BB/cranks) and one for smaller parts (stem/carbon bits).

    Together they cost me around 120-140 CDN.

  8. #8
    Rub it............
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    Performance has a nice torque wrench kit for like $90.00. That isn't too expensive. Its actually on sale now for like $65

    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...1_20000_400155

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheMajor
    Its just the price of the wrenches that kills me. They are crazy expensive.
    Yeah they can be, but worth every penny if you avoid stripping out a post mount on a fork, or under torquing a crank arm and it comes loose and buggers the crank. And as civil and The Major have noted, beam type torque wrenches, whill not as "cool" as click types, can be had a very reasonable prices, are quite accurate and easy to use.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  10. #10
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    I actually went looking for a torque wrench today and fond one for a motor bike but the range was 11-119nm (I think) I need 2.8-10nm.

    I tried some race shops near by but they don't have them but sold tons of carbon-fiber. I will try and find one tomorrow.

  11. #11
    Master of Disaster
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    Sette Torx ST-617 Torque Wrench - $39.98
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/153...que-Wrench.htm

    MTBR Review - Sette Torx ST-617 Torque Wrench
    http://www.mtbr.com/cat/accessories/...08_152crx.aspx

    Pedros 1/4 Inch Torque Bit Set - $11.98
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail.htm...9&style_id=325 pedtb8&detailName=Pedros 1/4 Inch Torque Bit Set&dept_id=2&deptName=accessories&sub_id=42&subName=Tools&lprice=11.98&hprice=11.98

  12. #12
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    Thanks but they are all in the states. I am in Japan. Shipping would cost a small fortune!

  13. #13
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    A torque wrench is an investment. If you wrench on your own ride they are well worth the money in the end, they keep everything running smoothly without stripped bolts.
    My neighbor kept complaining of a warped rotor and come to find out, he used a torx key to tighten it instead of a torque wrench. On that note, Ive never had a rotor warp from anything other than a big crash. I bet alot of the people saying that their rotors warped after a downhill wouldnt have that prob if the rotors were properly torqued.
    Anyways, too much coffee this morn.
    Torque wrench GO GO GO.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheMajor
    Thanks but they are all in the states. I am in Japan. Shipping would cost a small fortune!
    Check out wiggle and chain reaction.

    Free shipping to japan after 6700 yen apparently at wiggle. Large torque wrench is ~ 6100 yen.

  15. #15
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    I found a company in Tokyo that is listed as selling torque wrenches (2-15nm) for 8000. I emailed to check if they are in stock but no reply yet.

    It seems that torque's wrenches are more popular than I'd imagined.

  16. #16
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    I think of my torque wrench as Aspirin. It saves me headaches. Torquing everything to spec ensures smooth, trouble free operation.

  17. #17
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    Harborfreight has some cheap torque wrenches, but you really get what you pay for with their tools (in other words, expect it not to work at all, but be glad if it does).

    I have this one: $20, 20-200in-lb
    http://www.harborfreight.com/1-4-qua...ench-2696.html

    They also sell this one: $13 on sale, 5-80ft-lb
    http://www.harborfreight.com/3-8-eig...rench-807.html
    Matt

  18. #18
    Master of Disaster
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    Quote Originally Posted by m85476585
    I have this one: $20, 20-200in-lb
    http://www.harborfreight.com/1-4-qua...ench-2696.html

    They also sell this one: $13 on sale, 5-80ft-lb
    http://www.harborfreight.com/3-8-eig...rench-807.html
    Plus or minus 4% seems reasonable for the price - assuming that's an accurate range. I might try that 1/4-inch drive one.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clones123
    Plus or minus 4% seems reasonable for the price - assuming that's an accurate range. I might try that 1/4-inch drive one.
    I wouldn't believe that. Check McMaster-Carr; you won't find a +-4% torque wrench for under $100. Their cheapest one, $60, is rated for +-7%.

    But even if it's +-10% or more, it's still better than hand tightening.
    Matt

  20. #20
    Rub it............
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    They state +/- 4, but they never are. Harbor Freight stuff is reliably inaccurate. I've seen results of their calibration tests - I had all my Snap On stuff checked 2 years ago and they were less than 2% off +/- - and they can be closer to 10-12% off. Way too inaccurate to be worth the cost of saving a few bux.

    Don't cheap out. Spend the money and get the best quality torque wrench you can afford. If you don't have all the cash for a good one, save until you do. It will save you more money in the long run. On inaccurate torque application and you could be replacing a frame.

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