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  1. #1
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    Avid Elixir issue

    Hello everyone. I currently own a 2011 Trek Fuel EX, my question is I recently replaced the organic pads with semi metallic ones . The install went great, rode fine no rubbing at all . I recently came back from a two week vacation and rode yesterday morning and started feeling resistance in both front and rear wheels. The brakes were rubbing but what was strange is that at the beginning of the ride they were fine. As the bike warmed up the issue became noticeable and more severe . Should I bleed the entire system ? The pads are brand new and would hate to have to get the organic ones that don't last long at all . Thank you in advance for your comments. P.S. Or..... should I just kill my 12yr old nephew for putting his little "Meat Beaters" on my bike as I've suspected since my return !
    Last edited by SoFlaBiker; 09-10-2012 at 10:33 AM.

  2. #2
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    Bleed'em....ride'em....repeat. Avids are hard to get the air out of. It will probally take a few cycles to get all the air out. I think I had to bleed ride bleed ride about 3 times before they were finally right. Once you have them squared away, they should be trouble free.

  3. #3
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    Thanks MRMAS . I figured I would have to bleed the entire system out. Think I'll kill my 12yr nephew just for kicks anyways !

  4. #4
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    There is not enough info in your post to determine exactly what is going on, but the nephew would have to have done some tinkering to affect the integrity of the bleed (either open the system or apply the brakes without a rotor between the pads).

    One possibility is if the wheels had perhaps been off the bike...this can result in a situation where they seem seated, but after some riding, they settle in, causing brake rub. So, although I would generally assume you have already tried reinstalling the wheels, it's worth a try if you haven't.

    Another slight possibility is that the two systems have been slightly overfilled. This could result in a situation where upon the first adjustment (the pistons will ratchet outward in steps over time to account for the dimishing pad thickness and maintain consistent lever feel), the pads begin to rub whereas they did not rub previously. If this is the case, you can usually bleed a small amount of fluid out of the system without any special bleed tools - just push the pistons fully back into their bores and open the lever bleed screw (it helps to rotate the lever and position the bike so the bleed port is the highest point ofthe system).

    As for your nephew, just give him your old box of porn and a place to hide, and you will not see him for months.

    Good luck,
    Pete
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

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