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  1. #1
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    Avid Elixir CR vs. X0 vs. Shimano XT, all vs. Hayes Stroker Trail

    Hey guys, just joined the forum today as another avenue for brake research...

    Short Version: has anyone got experience with either the newest Avid Elixir CRs or X0's, or Shimano XT M775s? Also, could changing to an Avid rotor help mitigate the constant rubbing I'm getting with my Hayes brakes?

    Long Version: I currently have a set of Hayes Stroker Trails that I bought on closeout when I was building my rig last winter, for something like $60-70 per brake. At the time I thought it was a steal, now I just think it was a low price on a lousy part. I'd read good things about the Hayes and I don't have any issue with the modulation or stopping power, but they have zero adjustability for caliper positioning or pad spacing, so for the life of me I can't get them to stop rubbing - sometimes severly.

    I came from a set of Avid BB5's and I loved their spherical bushings for caliper adjustment. As such I was considering going to a set of Elixer CRs to get that adjustability back, but then I read about all the noise/vibration/turkey gobble issues, which sound just as irritating as rubbing (I've heard some reports, including from Avid themselves, that perhaps the 2011 CRs have been improved and no longer do this; not sure if I'm willing to risk it).

    I'd love to go with the X0's in the hopes they'd be more refined than the CRs but I don't know if that'd necessarily be the case, not to mention they're pricey (would like to stay around $400 for the set).

    The Shimano M775's were recommended to me as being similar in price to the CRs, but having improved modulation and NVH performance. I also like that they're a monobloc caliper.

    As silly as it sounds, I love the white color of my Hayes and that's what drew me to the CRs. The M775's are only available in black ...but I should really pay more attention to what works best. That's where I'm looking for feedback.

    Lastly, just today I've read several reports about changing to a different brand of rotor in order to clear up various issues. I have Avid rotors laying around that I could try with the Hayes brakes, but I won't be able to trail test them until spring. I'd rather not have the issue resurface then and have to deal with the rubbing all over again until I get new brakes put on. So if this doesn't seem like the kind of thing that could be remedied with different rotors then I won't bother with that step.

    Thanks for any help, and enjoy the ride.

  2. #2
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    I use a set of Stroker Trails on one of my bikes, and love them. Have you tried properly positioning the calipers, after resetting the pistons? How about the actual rotors- are they fairly true or do they have major hops on them? If they are out of true, you can try to bend them back to round yourself, or just replace them with fresh rotors. I've noticed this is more of an issue with larger rotors- the 203mm rotors on my AM bike have more hops than the 160mm rotors on my XC bike.

  3. #3
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    Disc brakes are a mixed bag it seems. Some riders slap them on and away they go until they need pads.Others have noise, lever throw & braking performance issues all the time. I have owned quite a few disc brake sets and have not had any real issues even w/ sets that even have poor reviews. I have found properly aligning the calipers, having clean pads / rotors & correct caliper piston position provides a trouble free brake.

  4. #4
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    Simply put, if you want a brake that will last, give you the least amount of troubles and stop with great power...go with XT. They aren't the lightest but they are the best where performance is the number one concern.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrampBredo
    I use a set of Stroker Trails on one of my bikes, and love them. Have you tried properly positioning the calipers, after resetting the pistons? How about the actual rotors- are they fairly true or do they have major hops on them? If they are out of true, you can try to bend them back to round yourself, or just replace them with fresh rotors. I've noticed this is more of an issue with larger rotors- the 203mm rotors on my AM bike have more hops than the 160mm rotors on my XC bike.
    Mine are 160mm rotors. They were new when the brakes went on and are still true. I've tried like crazy to position the calipers, even slotted the mounting holes a little with a file for extra adjustment. Even if I get them running smoothly, after riding a few miles they're rubbing again. It's as though one of the pistons isn't retracting all the way.

    Quote Originally Posted by keen
    ... I have found properly aligning the calipers, having clean pads / rotors & correct caliper piston position provides a trouble free brake.
    I agree. I think the downfall of the Hayes is that there's only one position they can bolt to the fork/frame. The only side-to-side adjustability is the difference between the bolt OD and the hole ID, and since they lack those spherical bushings the caliper is always perpendicular to the fork, not necessarily perpendicular to the rotor.

    Quote Originally Posted by ambassadorhawg
    Simply put, if you want a brake that will last, give you the least amount of troubles and stop with great power...go with XT. They aren't the lightest but they are the best where performance is the number one concern.
    Cool, thanks for the input.

  6. #6
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    I agree XT would be a good choice.

    If you like white color you can aslo check out formula k24 they are about the same price. I have the oro puro I love them.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by keen
    Disc brakes are a mixed bag it seems. Some riders slap them on and away they go until they need pads.Others have noise, lever throw & braking performance issues all the time. I have owned quite a few disc brake sets and have not had any real issues even w/ sets that even have poor reviews. I have found properly aligning the calipers, having clean pads / rotors & correct caliper piston position provides a trouble free brake.
    Agreed. I run a set of Avid CRs that I absolutely love. With proper set-up, they have no issues.

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