Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mtbnachos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    563

    New question here. Avid Elixir CR problem

    Sup guys wonder if anyone has a problem with the rear 160mm. I have it installed on a Jabberwocky and when I brake the frame vibrates violently. The pad and rotor are new. Not sure if the brake modulation of the Elixir doesn't mix well with the Jabberwocky's steel frame frequency response. What could cause this? Rotor/pad alignment? Defective rotor?

  2. #2
    RideSalsa
    Reputation: a_burnside's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    48
    I have had the same issue with my rear Elixir R, 160mm rotor on my Salsa El Santo frame (Scandium Tubing).
    It only seems to happen, for me, at slow speeds, (ex. less than 5mph) and doesn't seem to have any adverse effects on braking performance
    So I guess you're not aloneIMG_7369.JPG
    [SIZE=3]PIN IT YA' FAIRY![/SIZE]

  3. #3
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059
    This is basically the turkey gobble deal, or at least one element of it. It is an inconsistent symptom for many and has been debated adinfinitum as to the exact cause. I have two sets of Elixir R's on two bikes, and only one of the four units exhibited this vibration. I tried several things as mentioned in the megathread on this issue, but finally just the simple swap to a set of Jagwire sintered pads with aluminum backing fixed the problem. I still don't know exactly why. I don't think rotor size has anything to do with it.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,525
    I put organic pad in the rear and it solved the problem. Organics are a compromise for some though.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,883
    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    This is basically the turkey gobble deal, or at least one element of it. It is an inconsistent symptom for many and has been debated adinfinitum as to the exact cause. I have two sets of Elixir R's on two bikes, and only one of the four units exhibited this vibration. I tried several things as mentioned in the megathread on this issue, but finally just the simple swap to a set of Jagwire sintered pads with aluminum backing fixed the problem. I still don't know exactly why. I don't think rotor size has anything to do with it.
    I was gonna start a new thread about the Elixir Rs but I'm going right to the source: how do you like them, what other brakes have you had and compare the Elixirs to them. I currently have BB7s and they're maintenance free and stop me instantly. Convince me that I should build up my next bike with Elixir Rs!
    A blind man searches in a dark room for a black hat that isn't there. Dashiell Hammett

  6. #6
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059
    Well, I don't work for Avid by any means, but I work at a shop and have gotten to ride most brands and models of hydro brakes made, including the venerable old BB7's. I've had the least exposure to some of the 4-pot DH brakes, but I think most riders find them somewhat overkill for anything outside their intended use.

    While the BB7's are arguably the best cable operated brakes made, they don't match a good set of hydros of several brands and models...not just Avid. The modulation and power of most quality hydros is their strong point. If you've compared your BB7's to some quality hydros and didn't see a difference, I'd say either your riding type and terrain...or both...may not require more powerful hydros. And in fact, a good set of V-brakes may be sufficient in some situations. But if you have any aggessive riding in any terrain that requires some decent braking performance, hydros are really the only way to go IMO.

    The Elixir R's are excellently priced. They have great modulation and perhaps the most power of any other 2-piston brake available right now. On my Nomad, I was able to drop a rotor size on both front and rear because of the performance of the Elixirs. We sell Specialized as one of our brand bikes at the shop. Some of the '08 Stumpjumper FSRs had Juicy model brakes with 8" front and 7" rear rotors. The '09 SJ FSR model is an identical bike but came with Elixir brakes and the same size rotors. Wow...the '09 model has way too much braking power as a result IMO. Specialized obviously didn't realize how much more powerful the Elixirs were going to be compared to the Juicys.

    Frankly I think you'll benefit from many of the other brands of quality hydro brakes over your BB7s. The Elixirs are just one of the better performers IMO.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,883
    Frankly I think you'll benefit from many of the other brands of quality hydro brakes over your BB7s. The Elixirs are just one of the better performers IMO.[/QUOTE]

    I feel you can give me as unbiased an opinion as any on these forums. I've been a BB7 guy for a long time, had them on 6 bikes. My only hydro experience was with Hayes HFX (?) a low end spec on some medium range bikes. My BB7s were superior in every way.

    Flash forward to today. I've read enough hydro vs mechanical disk brake threads to know that hydro users are adamant that hydros are superior in every way. There's always the rider who complains that he was "always fiddling with his BB7s, they were so high maintenance" which is the opposite of all my experiences with BB7s. Mine have always been maintenance free and stop me on a dime (of course, for my riding style...check my username!)

    So my question to you is: what is there about the Elixir Rs that a guy coming from BB7s wouldn't know and nobody would think to tell him because they wouldn't know that I wouldn't know...you know? Like...heck, I don't know, maintenance schedule, pad rub, what lengths to buy for front and back (let's say a medium 2009 Turner Spot) and if the cables aren't the right length, what kit would I need to buy and what kind of a PITA is it to shorten Elixir cables?

    This is all stuff that hydro peeps know and I have no clue about. I would just like to not be surprised by anything if I get a set. I want to take them out of the box, put them on and ride. No scratching of head and saying "why didn't somebody tell me this?"
    A blind man searches in a dark room for a black hat that isn't there. Dashiell Hammett

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by smithrider
    I put organic pad in the rear and it solved the problem. Organics are a compromise for some though.
    +1 - I switched to organic pads and the problem disappeared. Seems to be different for everyone though.

  9. #9
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059
    Now that's a question...er, questions...LOL!

    On the out-of-the-box plug and play you seek, so far every set we've installed at the shop have been just that...including mine. On the hose length, the set on my Bullit could use a slight trim, but I'm lazy...they're working flawlessly...so I'll get around to it. Avid's bleed kit comes with new hose crush washers and everything needed for a bleed and hose trim.

    In a worst case scenario, a guy posted here just recently that both his Elixirs apparently need bleeding evidenced by a mushy lever...odd but possible. In that case, a bleed kit takes care of that problem, albeit somewhat of an annoyance for a new brakeset. On the other hand, I don't think anyone should be without a bleed kit that services their particular hydros.

    On the turkey gobble/vibration issue, if you have a brake unit that produces this, it's usually the rear, and most seem to be fixed by a change to a different pad compound and/or pad backing material.

    These are the sum of the potential problems that I can think of, but the odds are in your favor of troublefree operation as with most brakes. However, as one can see from reading the many brake posts on this forum, no brand/model of brakeset is always perfect.

    I had a couple of sets of BB7's in the past...best cable operated brakes made IMO. I didn't feel they were problematic, adjustment sensitive, or constantly needing fiddling. They weren't, however, nearly as strong as my Hayes Mags or the Elixirs.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mtbnachos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    563
    Thanks TNC, I think I'll swap with Jagwire pads to the rear Elixir CR and see what happens, if that doesnt work get a new rotor. I'll let you guys know the dealio.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,525
    The Elixirs are the best brakes I have tried thus far. Save the warble issue (again solved with organic pad in rear), they are spectacular. My last two brakes have been El Caminos and Juicy Sevens. I have also ridden the new XT's which aren't bad.

  12. #12
    *****************
    Reputation: Bikinfoolferlife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    12,379
    Been using BBDB/BB7 brakes for 9 years or so. Finally gave in and thought I'd try the current crop of hydraulics via the Elixir CR. Very happy, works great, takes a bit of getting used to but much better than the other hydraulics I've tried. A bit fussy due to pad-rotor clearance and a post mount fork to set up just right, but a bit of time and creativity and no problem now, but I'd have to do that with the mechanicals, too. There's only so much CPS will do for ya....
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •