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  1. #1
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    Avid BB7 rotor upgrade

    Good morning all.

    I ran a search and didn't necessarily come up with the answer I was looking for so forgive me if this topic has been touched on before.

    Currently I have upgraded the stock brake system on my Ironhorse Maverick to Avid BB7's and love them. EXCEPT there is a 1-2 mile down hill section which we ride weekly where I notice a lot of brake fade. The rotor size is 160 mm and I wanted to know if upgrading to a larger size rotor will help with brake fade - generally with cars and motorcycles this will work.

    If so do I need to get a Avid rotor or what other rotors will work? Also what is the maximum size rotor I can get to work with the provided adaptors and BB7's setup?

    Thanks in advance for your assistance!

  2. #2
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    Sticking with rotors of the same brand is generally a good idea, but the BB7s have a lot of flexibility in this. If you move away from Avid rotors just try to find something the same width and diameter as avid rotors.

    With your current adapters on your bike you're stuck with 160mm rotors. If you go bigger you'll need different adapters (stick with Avid adapters). With BB7s you can go up to185mm or even 203mm pretty easily. The limiting factor could be you fork. Some rigid carbon forks, for example, have 160mm rotor limits. Most suspension forks are fine up to 203mm. Check with the fork manufacture before getting a bigger rotor just to be safe.

    A bigger rotor should help with fade. Better vented rotors will help as well, even if they're the same size. I've used BB7s with both 160mm G2 Clean Sweep and Roundagon rotors and found the Clean Sweeps faded less.

  3. #3
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    Thanks Fancy Hat. I have a Manitou front shock so I think I should be fine with the upgrade to a larger rotor.

    The Avid's also came with various adaptors when i bought the front and rear setup. One of these should work correct? I went to performance last night and they did not have a larger rotor in stock, any suggestions on where to get the clean sweep rotors?

    Thanks!

  4. #4
    Ride Everything
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    I run Hayes V6 rotors with my BB7s, and find that they work really well.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by krazychowmein
    Thanks Fancy Hat. I have a Manitou front shock so I think I should be fine with the upgrade to a larger rotor.

    The Avid's also came with various adaptors when i bought the front and rear setup. One of these should work correct? I went to performance last night and they did not have a larger rotor in stock, any suggestions on where to get the clean sweep rotors?

    Thanks!
    Just because you have a Manitou fork doesn't necessarily mean it's fine, depends on which model fork it is (if it's old enough it could be a problem for larger rotors).

    Don't know what came with your brakes, but if you bought 160 rotors it likely came only with 160 hardware unless you got some unusual package deal.

    Just google for avid clean sweep rotors and you'll get plenty of options for buying...
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  6. #6
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    My Ironhorse is a 2005 Warrior and came with a Manitou Splice. Thanks for the tip on the mounting hardware I thought it came with the right adaptor for an upgrade already.

  7. #7
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    Wouldn't aftermarket (ie EBC) pads also make a difference?
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  8. #8
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    Actually, on a car if you have fade you change the pads THEN if you need to change the disks. I would look at pads first then do disks (actually, both) fading is often a function of the pads you run more than the ability of the rotor to dump the heat.

  9. #9
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    This is true, the pads only have maybe 100 miles on them so I was thinking the pads were still ok, they are the stock pads that came with the BB7's I have heard changing to organic (i think) will aid in eliminating the squeeling but that's not my issue. Any suggestions on pads? I know someone suggested EBC which I recognize from my car days as they make great pads for autos.

    Thanks!

  10. #10
    JmZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by krazychowmein
    This is true, the pads only have maybe 100 miles on them so I was thinking the pads were still ok, they are the stock pads that came with the BB7's I have heard changing to organic (i think) will aid in eliminating the squeeling but that's not my issue. Any suggestions on pads? I know someone suggested EBC which I recognize from my car days as they make great pads for autos.

    Thanks!
    I went from the stock pads on the BB7 to EBC pads, and later to Avid Organics when those wore out.

    The non stock pads did squeel less, and they also 'bit' better. I only had fade once, but it was on a decent downhill, and it was because the pads were going. (I.e. not the brakes fault, I should have replaced brake pads earlier.)

    The Avid Organics were good, as well EBC Green's. Also have Kool Stops (but have not mounted them yet), and both of the ones I've tried have been superior in feel, and braking, than the stock pads.

    Getting the Avid's or Kool Stops have been easy, finding the EBC's has been hit or miss...

    The Organics sacrifice pad life for a bit more friction and better feel.

    JmZ
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  11. #11
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    Thanks for the input on pads JmZ, squeeling is not necessarily the problem it's the fade that I'm trying to eliminate because on our normal loop there is a downhill stretch that's a little over a mile and the brakes start to fade half way down. I'm not on the brakes constantly but with the possibility of a group of hikers walking 4 across (yes it has happened) we try to not fly too quickly down the hill. Also rangers with radar guns is not fun.

  12. #12
    Prez NMBA
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    I guess i didn't realize that brake fade was really an issue with mechanical disks since there is no fluid to heat up and compress. I would think that it would be more an issue with pads than with the rotors.

  13. #13
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    What happens if I use different adapters with BB7? That is, no tri-align CPS setup.

    Say, a 160 mm rotor (e. g. Formula, Hayes), a Hope (precise CNC machined) 160 mm IS to PM adapter and maybe some precise shims to simulate the tri-align washers for radial positioning of the caliper. And, the IS mounts on the fork and the frame are properly faced.

    Is there sufficient imprecision in adapter contact surface on the BB7 caliper to cause alignment problems without CPS, provided that all other surfaces involved are treated to good tolerances?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nmba guy
    I guess i didn't realize that brake fade was really an issue with mechanical disks since there is no fluid to heat up and compress. I would think that it would be more an issue with pads than with the rotors.
    K another cause of brake fade is the heating of the rotor and pads. When most materials (metals in the case) are heated their surfaces become slicker, of course only up to the point of it being hot enough to weld the materials to each other.

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