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  1. #26
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    Take the bike back and tell the shop owner your brakes suck and ask a mechanic to check them out. What do you have to lose?

  2. #27
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    well....

    I may have been wrong.

    After breaking the pads in very gently and correctly around my neighborhood, I finally got to hit the trail today (they have all been closed due to mud/rain).... yeah.... even if the Elixer 3s "suck" they are really pretty nice. They do not have the true stopping power of the XTRs I had before, but they are a bit nicer to ride with. I would NEVER use these for a trail with any sort of longer downhill section... but I have a plan working to replace them with XTs (and XT trekking levers to clear my Gripshift better).

    Yeah... discs are nice.
    Fat guys need bikes too.

  3. #28
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    the 10% rule
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    '01Rocket88< ran over it.. always do a full walk around!
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  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by shwinn8 View Post
    the 10% rule
    huh?
    Fat guys need bikes too.

  5. #30
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    I've a sneaky hunch you'll be more than pleasantly surprised by the power of the new 785 XTs, I know I was. Just make sure and grab some of the at least RT76 2 piece Shimano rotors or RT 86 Ice Tech if you have long DHs. Only problem for me now is my old "good" Hayes Strokers are now on my HT and I rode that yesterday and I had to apply so much power and even then no where near the power of the XT, so will be looking for a 2nd set of XTs soon.
    Quote Originally Posted by Knight511 View Post
    well....

    I may have been wrong.

    After breaking the pads in very gently and correctly around my neighborhood, I finally got to hit the trail today (they have all been closed due to mud/rain).... yeah.... even if the Elixer 3s "suck" they are really pretty nice. They do not have the true stopping power of the XTRs I had before, but they are a bit nicer to ride with. I would NEVER use these for a trail with any sort of longer downhill section... but I have a plan working to replace them with XTs (and XT trekking levers to clear my Gripshift better).

    Yeah... discs are nice.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
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  6. #31
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    Considering the size of dude they will be stopping, I will be putting 200/180 on the bike for sure.... Icetek pads and rotors.

    Went for real ride #2 today.... I am a believer now. It isn't that they are so much better, I just spend a lot less time thinking about braking with these...
    Fat guys need bikes too.

  7. #32
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    I just bought a 2013 Trek Wahoo and it has cable disc brakes. They are the first disc-brakes I have had on a bike and I noticed the same thing about not a lot of stopping force.
    This bedding in of the brakes is new to me, perhaps someone could explain to me since I am a newb,
    Will the brakes get stronger after a bit of riding? I have about 3-4 hours on the bike so far.

    Thanks

  8. #33
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    To bed the brakes.... speed up to 10-15mph and then come to a gradual controlled stop. Ride for a couple of minutes to cool the brakes. Repeat this 20-30 times and they bed in very nicely. All you are trying to do is to gently transfer some pad material to the rotors to aid in producing friction to stop. My Elixer 3s (as bad as some say they are) really improved with the bed in procedure.

    Remember, you will need to bed the brakes any time you switch rotors, pads or both.
    Fat guys need bikes too.

  9. #34
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    So everyone in this thread complaining about discs is complaining about a brake that isn't working properly.

    Like with most technology, the newer tech is better, but may also be easier to mess up if you don't know what to do. Knowledge is power.

    Rim brakes are really hard to mess up. Every mechanic knows how to set them so they work fine. They bed in almost instantly.

    DIsc brakes are easy to mess up. A lot of mechanics still don't know basic disc brake setup procedures like bed in, piston resets, and identification of contaminated pads or air in the system.

    The requirement of bed in is a *****. If a brake isn't bedded in and a rider doesn't know about it, they'll jump on their new bike and go for the brakes, which will be very weak. They'll pull very hard and quickly overheat the non bedded in pads and screw them. Now you have a shitty brake until its pads are resurfaced/replaced and bedded in properly.

    I tell every person who's disc brakes I work on about bed in. Not enough people know about it and it causes most problems with disc brakes.

    If you have a quality disc brake that's working properly, the only thing that can ever compete with it for braking power and modulation is a road caliper brake, which obviously aren't applicable for big tires.

  10. #35
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    On damp, icy or muddy conditions, disc brake outperforms rim brake. For road use, rim brakes are sufficient.

  11. #36
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    I've never yet had a V-brake that even got close to a disc brake's power and control......I should say a properly set up disc brake.

    If you just go and ride them without the proper break-in, the chances of a glazed pad run at about 100%. They will never work properly then until the glaze is sanded off.

    to OP - even elixir 3's will outperform v-brakes by a substantial margin. Whoever installed them without telling you the proper procedure for bedding in has a lot to answer for.
    Rimmer - "There's an old human saying - if you talk garbage, expect pain"

  12. #37
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    Golly gee whiz yes of course disks are better. Thats not the point. Going to disks brings on new problems the vees don't have. If one is not mechanically inclined, as evident by the many postings about issues with disks, and one doesn't need disks for their riding experience, why make the move? To support the lbs? To keep money flowing to the bike industry? To satisfy people here? If one needs disks, great! If not, save your money.
    lean forward

  13. #38
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    Well, my pads have bed in on my Elixer Ones, and I maxed out the lever adjusters, which was a pain in the rear, as the allen bolt is at a bad angle for most tools. I had to use a ball end allen bit to be able to get at it and not have to reposition every 1/6 of a turn. The brakes stop really well with pretty light pressure, but even with the lever adjusters maxed out, it still comes closer to the bar than I like. I moved the levers as far in as possible so I can use 1 finger or 2 fingers and not hit the others, but I would like to have a bit more room to grab them without worrying about running out of travel.

    I don't think they have air in them, because the pads move out immediately with the slightest lever movement, and they don't pump up, or even feel spongy at all. I would go ahead and bleed them, but I don't have the special bleed kit that is required. I won't be paying $40-65 for some syringes tubing, and fittings that would cost less than $7 through a pharmacy, and a hardware store. I will probably pay a shop to bleed them, only to find they are the same afterward.

    Why can't they just put a damn bleed screw, and a fill cap on it. That way if you are on a long ride, and you have some normal tools with you, you could at least put some water in it to have a brake temporarily.
    That's not really something I'd end up doing, but when are they going to come to some kind of universal standard?
    I like the Shimano brakes for their Servo-wave linkage, and normal M/C piston, rather than Avid's tapered bore, diaphragm crap, Are they also able to be bled without special propietary fittings? That would be unlike Shimano, but hey they might have screwed up, and missed an opportunity to squeeze a few more dollars out of us.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Knight511 View Post
    Considering the size of dude they will be stopping, I will be putting 200/180 on the bike for sure.... Icetek pads and rotors.

    Went for real ride #2 today.... I am a believer now. It isn't that they are so much better, I just spend a lot less time thinking about braking with these...

    I am a large Clyde and use the RT86's with 180/160 finned XT's and have no stopping issues.
    These TX's stop just fine when broken in correctly.

    Mark
    2012 XXL Carve Expert

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