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  1. #1
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    After a Bleed, I've no stopping power.. What's wrong?!

    Hiya folks, newbie here so please excuse my terminology.

    Problem : After a brake bleed, my brake lever is hard/good/tight, but I now donít have much stopping power, and sometimes the brake squeaks.

    Background: I have just bought a 2nd hand bike with Shimano BR-M445 hydraulic disc brakes.
    The rear brake lever had a lot of Ďtravelí in it before the brakes gripped, so I decide to have a try at bleeding.

    I removed the brake pads, used spacers, and did a bleed BUT then stupidly took out the spacers and used the brake lever and the piston popped out (along with some oil). Oops!!!
    So, I fixed that, did a re-bleed, and it felt good to the touch (brake levers seemed perfect), but this morning on its first ride, when I brake, I donít skid/stop but instead I slow down and the pads just donít seem to grip any more no matter how much pressure I have on the lever. Also itís squeaks a bit.

    Could you offer any suggestions as to what the problem is. Or how I can fix.

    Thanks in advance.
    Great forum BTW way, Heaps of info.

    Doran

  2. #2
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    The first incident probably dumped oil all over the pads. Did you replace them?

  3. #3
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    Sure sounds to me like oil-soaked pads. I'd replace them.

    Frank

  4. #4
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    I was thinking maybe the same as I used the old pads, but, when i did the bleed i had removed them and used spacers and did my best not to get them mucky.
    Could this still be the case? are the pads super sensitive to oil?

  5. #5
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    They are pretty sensitive. You might try baking them or an open flame to burn any oil on them.

    actually, first thing I'd do is swap in the front pads for a sec and see if the problem goes away. If it does, you know pads are the problem. If not, they probably aren't.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    They are pretty sensitive. You might try baking them or an open flame to burn any oil on them.

    actually, first thing I'd do is swap in the front pads for a sec and see if the problem goes away. If it does, you know pads are the problem. If not, they probably aren't.
    Wipe the rotor down with alcohol first before putting the good pads on - if the rotors are contaminated no point contaminating the known good set of pads

  7. #7
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    Good idea about swapping the pads..
    oh and what should i use to clean the whole area with (but not the pads) to remove any excess oil that may be lingering around.. will fairy liquid do?

  8. #8
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    Wash the brake area with soap and water....then rinse...

    Take out the pads....put in an old fry pan on med heat when the stop smoking let them cool down...sand with fine grit sand paper to remove the carbon...

    Sand the rotor as well....just grasp the sandpaper between your fingers and rotate the wheel several times...

    Install pads and go down a steep hill several times the brake should rapidly increase in braking power.

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