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Thread: 07 xtr disc

  1. #1
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    07 xtr disc

    Anyone have any good instructions on how to shorten the brakelines on a pair of 2007 XTR disc brakes, or any helpful links? Thanks

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    remove your brake shoes
    drain the lines
    unscrew the lever end
    cut it to length, install new insert & olive (might be able to reuse, but shimano recommends new)
    reconnect lines
    bleed
    reinstall shoes
    the shimano technnical instructions are #si-8h40c

    http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=126
    instructions
    Last edited by dan0; 02-08-2007 at 07:14 PM.

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    Try this.http://bike.shimano.com/catalog/cycl...=1170990707280
    You're looking for SM-BH59 probably.
    A bicycle will take you to fantastic places....if you let it.


    Ibis fan since '08 now rolling on the big wheeled Ripley.

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    My XT brakes came with an Olive & Isert (only one of each) which is good because the hose for the rear is significantly too long. I'm pretty much in the same dilemma as yourself and have just found these instructions. The black hose if you have it is cuttable.

    http://bike.shimano.com/publish/cont...lation.pdf.pdf
    energetix



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    Does anyone know if the Olive & Insert are re-usable, any risk (leakage etc) in doing so?
    Since the brakes are new is it ok to drain out the fluid, cut the hose to lenght, put it all together & bleed the fluid back in topping it up with some fresh stuff?
    Otherwise anyone know if 1 shimano bleed kit is good just for one bleed (ie one brake) or more?
    energetix



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    JMH
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    I would try the easy way first.

    Draining the line is not necessary, and often you don't even need to re-bleed the brake if you are careful. Put the lever at such an angle that fluid won't run out when you remove the line. Once you have shortened the line, put a few extra drops in the lever hole and reinstall the line.

    In my experience, about half the time you don't need to bleed the brake after this procedure. If you do end up having to bleed, no harm done.

    I suppose you could surgically cut out the existing insert and reuse it, but the olive will be destroyed.

    Also, some sort of too for installing the brass insert will make your life much easier.

    JMH

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    Quote Originally Posted by energetix
    Otherwise anyone know if 1 shimano bleed kit is good just for one bleed (ie one brake) or more?
    The shimano bleed kit should be enough for one bike (2 brakes), and still have some fluid left over- provided none of it was wasted/spilled. The bleed kit that I have comes with a 50ml bottle of mineral oil.

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    Quote Originally Posted by energetix
    Does anyone know if the Olive & Insert are re-usable, any risk (leakage etc) in doing so?
    Since the brakes are new is it ok to drain out the fluid, cut the hose to lenght, put it all together & bleed the fluid back in topping it up with some fresh stuff?
    Otherwise anyone know if 1 shimano bleed kit is good just for one bleed (ie one brake) or more?
    You don't want to re-use the olive.
    A bicycle will take you to fantastic places....if you let it.


    Ibis fan since '08 now rolling on the big wheeled Ripley.

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    Quote Originally Posted by energetix
    Does anyone know if the Olive & Insert are re-usable, any risk (leakage etc) in doing so?
    Since the brakes are new is it ok to drain out the fluid, cut the hose to lenght, put it all together & bleed the fluid back in topping it up with some fresh stuff?
    Otherwise anyone know if 1 shimano bleed kit is good just for one bleed (ie one brake) or more?

    Examine the olive for any signs, of out of round or scoring from the female fitting.

    I was unable to cut the insert out of the tube without scoring it.

    The ferrule (olive) permanently deforms when clamped into the fitting.

    But because the hose is plastic not steel, olive can deform a bit more to "regrab" the hose.

    In the end, with new insert you get a new olive.

    Since I bought, a lever kit that came with the wrong end (strainght instead of bango), I have lots of spares, and so use new.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackson1
    Anyone have any good instructions on how to shorten the brakelines on a pair of 2007 XTR disc brakes, or any helpful links? Thanks
    If they are already installed on your bike, take off the wheels and pull the brake pads. Make sure you put the plastic spacer block in the place of the brake pads. Loosen the brake lever and tilt it up to horizontally level. Retighten it. Pull off the rubber cover to expose the tightening bolt, and move the rubber cover further down the brake line and out of the way.

    Measure how many inches you want to cut off the hose and make a mark on it. Take a pair of needle nose pliers and hold the hose firmly without crushing it. Make sure that you are holding it perpendicular so you can cut it straight and even. Use a sharp box cutter to slowly saw through the hose. Make sure it is a clean cut! When it is cut, zip-tie the hose lightly to the handlebar pointing upward and make sure the lever isn't leaking.

    A new olive and connector valve from a LBS will cost you $2-3. While holding the shortened hose lightly with the pliers (use a piece of paper, etc. between the pliers and the hose to avoid damaging it) brace it against the handlebar and carefully whack the connector valve into place with another tool (preferably something rubberized so you don't damage the connector. Be careful not to nick your handlebar, either. Make sure the end of the connector is resting firmly against the hose. Thread on the new olive.

    Unscrew the tightening bolt from the brake lever. It shouldn't leak, but be prepared in case it does. Pull the end of the hose with the old olive out, and thread in the new one. Make sure it is inserted as far as it will go! Thread the bolt back in and tighten it down firmly. Pop the rubber protector back on the bolt.

    CAREFULLY remove the lever reservior cap, pull the rubber bladder out (put them down and out of the way). Add mineral oil until it reaches the top of the reservoir and start pumping the brake lever. Keep pumping it until you get several air bubbles out of the hose that rise to the top of the fluid. Make sure that the lever feel isn't squishy after you do this, If it is, you'll have to re-bleed it fully.

    Put the cap back on, put the brake pads back in, the wheels back on, and you're done! Whatever you do, don't get any fluid on the brake pads or the disc rotors.
    Last edited by schlim; 02-09-2007 at 04:32 PM.

  11. #11
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    Thanks

    Thanks for the detailed instructions!

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    Thanks for the tips everyone & the detailed instructions. This will be a great help!

    When you bleed using the normal procedure does squeezing the lever force the bubbles down to the caliper & out once you undo the bleed screw? Trying to get my head around the whole "top to bottom" bleeding process. I know it's the same as a car so obviously it works, my thoughts were that air would have a tendency to want to go towards the lever / resevoir rather than the caliper. But under the pressure of squeezed levers is there some sort of scientific or otherwise explanation why it would go to the caliper?
    energetix



  13. #13
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    Hey I did it today, the kids were both sleeping so I figured I'd take the opportunity.
    I decided to try the easy way first, the rear brake seems to feel a bit spongy compared to the front so I figured it needs a bleed anyway.
    As per instructions I undid the bolt at the lever with a 8mm spanner. Cut the hose and proceeded putting the insert in before remembering oh bugger forgot the olive, anyway it fit over the insert (phew) so no worries. Used a cloth, some pliers to hold the hose while pushing the insert in with a plastic michelin tyre lever. The hose did get a bit pinched but nothing a few squeezes with the pliers couldn't fix. Put it all back together & the feel at the lever is still the same (slightly spongy). So in a few days I'll give bleeding a go.

    It was easy & not a drop of brake fluid from the lever came out! I did level it horizontal for the job just in case and had a cloth ready to catch any spill. Did end up with some fluid on my floor from the length of hose that was cut off. Also used some kitchen scizzors (sharp ones) to cut it with, not the neatest cut though I'd use something better next time round.
    It's correct, the hardest part is trying to push the insert in.
    energetix



  14. #14
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    [QUOTE=energetix]Hey I did it today, the kids were both sleeping so I figured I'd take the opportunity.
    I decided to try the easy way first, the rear brake seems to feel a bit spongy compared to the front so I figured it needs a bleed anyway.
    As per instructions I undid the bolt at the lever with a 8mm spanner. Cut the hose and proceeded putting the insert in before remembering oh bugger forgot the olive, anyway it fit over the insert (phew) so no worries. Used a cloth, some pliers to hold the hose while pushing the insert in with a plastic michelin tyre lever. The hose did get a bit pinched but nothing a few squeezes with the pliers couldn't fix. Put it all back together & the feel at the lever is still the same (slightly spongy). So in a few days I'll give bleeding a go.

    It was easy & not a drop of brake fluid from the lever came out! I did level it horizontal for the job just in case and had a cloth ready to catch any spill. Did end up with some fluid on my floor from the length of hose that was cut off. Also used some kitchen scizzors (sharp ones) to cut it with, not the neatest cut though I'd use something better next time round.

    I replaced my line last night, I bought the shimano brake line "kit" it comes with a plastic 2 piece block, you clamp it on the hose and tap the insert in with a hammer, real slick and takes seconds, as a bonus 1 half of the block is a perfect fit between the pistons for bleeding
    the bad news, when I removed the brake shoes for bleeding I put them in the lid of my tool box, I attached the hose to the bleed port and started the bleeding but the oil keept going back in ,so I tried to bend the hose and it popped off and landed....in the lid of the tool box on the brake shoes, just a tiny drip but today the shoes werent working to well, so I'm going to try sanding them a little. it that doesnt work , new shoes

    BTW the kit has enough oil for both brakes but only 1 set of hardware (olive, insert, screw and cover)

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    Oh gee that's got to be bad luck!

    I imagine the pads absorb the oil in and would be hard to clean it out even with isopropyl? I'd clean, sand and then clean with isopropyl again to see if it helps.

    I brought the cheap bleed kit with my brakes (just oil & a tube). The actual brake set came with one olive & insert - I guess they figure that only the rear hose would need shortening on most bikes.
    The olives would be such cheap items I don't see why they would have to skimp on it in the set. But then I guess you don't really shorten the hoses more than once.

    Good luck with your pads, would be a bummer to have to replace considering they're new, mind you probably a good excuse to get the metal ones rather than organic. I rode past a sprinkler yesterday (just riding out the front with the kids) and heard some squeeling. I don't mind as long as it's only in the rain and not all the time.
    energetix



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by energetix
    Oh gee that's got to be bad luck!

    I imagine the pads absorb the oil in and would be hard to clean it out even with isopropyl? I'd clean, sand and then clean with isopropyl again to see if it helps.

    I brought the cheap bleed kit with my brakes (just oil & a tube). The actual brake set came with one olive & insert - I guess they figure that only the rear hose would need shortening on most bikes.
    The olives would be such cheap items I don't see why they would have to skimp on it in the set. But then I guess you don't really shorten the hoses more than once.

    Good luck with your pads, would be a bummer to have to replace considering they're new, mind you probably a good excuse to get the metal ones rather than organic. I rode past a sprinkler yesterday (just riding out the front with the kids) and heard some squeeling. I don't mind as long as it's only in the rain and not all the time.
    just about all disc brakes squeal when wet, but I have to say the xts seem to squeal the least, I swapped the xt brakes off my other bike for some Juicy 7s, BIG mistake, they squeal alot more even when not wet, and even though they have 8" rotors, the 6" xts stop better. but I have a brand new set of shoes from the old xts

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    I'm amazed I don't even have to bleed it, well I'll leave it for a while because since I've shortened the hose the rear feels pretty similar to the front.
    They're great compared to the Soles, the soles were notably alot more off or on rather than having any modulation / braking control.
    I'm talking about the XT's here just in case anyone is following the thread, but pretty much the same bleeding / hose cutting method would apply as for the XTR's.
    energetix



  18. #18
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    Yeap.. Shimano brakes are real easy to bleed.... I still prefer to refill from the caliper using a syringe..... I open the bleed port with the hose from the "cheap" kit attached and pull the fluid into the syringe and close the port, do whatever I need to do (cut line etc), open the post again, push the fluid through until it gets up to the reservoir (reservoir cover is off the whole time), I fill the reservoir completely with some extra oil..... tap the caliper a couple of times to release any bubbles...pull the levers a couple of times so that the bubbles come up... and done....

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