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  1. #1
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    Trailfox 01 with Avid BB7s?

    Hey guys! First post here on mtbr.

    I'm building up a 2007 BMC Trailfox 01 bike and I have a question about the brakes. This is my first all mountain bike and also the first one with disc brakes, so I'd like to know how you guys would set up a rear brake, say a BB7, on this frame. There are no traditional cable stops for the rear brake, just supports for a hydraulic hose. Can I run one long length of cable housing from the lever to the brake? I'm thinking this may lead to more compression, so I'd like to know what you guys think. Thanks!

  2. #2
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    yes, I'd go with full length housing, just make sure it is some good quality housing and use a teflon-coated cable, no kinks in the routing, and you'll be fine.

  3. #3
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    Thanks crazylax, I'll try that out.

  4. #4
    Dirt Deviant
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    Make sure you get compressionless cable as well. this is the most important part of cable disc brakes.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  5. #5
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    Yeah, I plan on getting Jagwire Ripcords for both derailleurs and brakes
    Last edited by JuliusHettig; 10-07-2008 at 10:47 AM.

  6. #6
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    Do not get the teflon coated cables!! They are junk. The teflon coating comes off and gunks up in the housing. Do as the others have said: compressionless housing and a standard stainless steel cable. Lube the cable with tri-flow as you install it into the housing and you will be impressed!

  7. #7
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    What would you recommend for cables and housings?

  8. #8
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  9. #9
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    better yet, just get hydraulic brakes.
    why do you want mechanicals? Hydros work too well? Too easy to set up and maintain? Too light? ... scratching my head trying to think of an advantage of BB7s over comparably priced hydro brakes.

  10. #10
    Big Gulps, Alright!
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    Get a Jagwire Switch kit...

    EDIT: Mechanicals are just as easy to set-up, and arguably easier to maintain (no bleeding required). They're also far cheaper, work just as well when properly set-up and as far as weight is concerned, there isn't a huge difference...

  11. #11
    Map Maker
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    +1 for Avid BB7
    Run a good quality full length housing and a stainless cable. No need for the super expensive Gore ride-on kit.

    get some good Avid SD levers too.
    like:
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/168...evers-2008.htm
    Richmond, VA
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules
    better yet, just get hydraulic brakes.
    why do you want mechanicals? Hydros work too well? Too easy to set up and maintain? Too light? ... scratching my head trying to think of an advantage of BB7s over comparably priced hydro brakes.
    I agree. The cost difference of discounted / close-out on entry - mid level hydros v.s. the BB7 mechanical system is negligible. The BB7's are kinda heavy too.
    DH:Mountain Cycle Shockwave 9.5 w/ 888R
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  13. #13
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    Hey, thanks for the feedback guys. I'll have a look at those cable kits and I'll look at a few others now that I have a better idea of what to get.

  14. #14
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    BB-7's work well if set up right. Can tune modulation level.

    Do like others have said, use good quality housing full length. BB-7's can be set up for lots of power or more modulation. Follow the setup guide that comes with the brakes for the proper spacing of the pads during setup.

    Since one pad runs close to the rotor, and the other pad flexes the rotor over against the other pad, you can tune the feel by the setup. If the pad is close, and it only has to flex the rotor a small amount, then it will have a quicker "on" feel. If the pad is a little further away, then the rotor has to be flexed a little more before it squeezes tightly on the rotor, and this gives a little more feel if it is locking too easy.

    Set up well, you can do easy 2 finger nose wheelies. They do not lack power, and you can tune in the amount of modulation you want. After riding through the era of under the chainstay U-brakes, they are a dream, especially in the wet, and in cross country usage they really don't give up much, if anything to most hydraulic setups.

  15. #15
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    i have bb7s and i just couldnt imagine needing anything any stronger, braking on one finger easy, the pull doesnt cause any fatigue even on very long fast descents requiring alot of braking.... i just dont see any advantage going to hydraulics with the maintenance and care they need.... maybe if your gonna be riding strictly downhill at whistler or something....

  16. #16
    Alien Surf Team
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    I think both the BB5 and BB7 have plenty of power, but the BB7 is infinitely more easy to adjust. Normally I only use 1 finger with my BB7s and only switch to 2 fingers if I know there will be very heavy braking for an extended time. But don't use that crap disc that comes with the BB7. The round-a-gone (or whatever the name is) suck. The ones that came with mine were warped and I tossed them.

  17. #17
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    I had Juicy 5's which were replaced under warranty with Codes. The Codes were too much for me. I was going to go with BB7's, but:

    BB7's ~$120 + S&H
    SD7 levers ~$26 + S&H
    Cables ~ $15 - $25

    New Avid Elixir R's - $194 shipped


    No contest.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed
    I had Juicy 5's which were replaced under warranty with Codes. The Codes were too much for me. I was going to go with BB7's, but:

    BB7's ~$120 + S&H
    SD7 levers ~$26 + S&H
    Cables ~ $15 - $25

    New Avid Elixir R's - $194 shipped


    No contest.
    Where did you get these prices.

  19. #19
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    I got the BB7 prices from Jenson, pricepoint, and Universalcycles. Granted you can buy old closeout stuff for a bit less. There was one set of BB7's with SD7 levers that went for $84 on ebay. They were stated to be new "take-off's". Other than that, you can find BB7's there for $109 all day long, but they still like to bend you over on shipping.

    The Elixirs have been running $195 on ebay from various distributors 'round the USA. I got mine from a shop in CA for $194 shipped.

  20. #20
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    I hate that my first post on MTBR is reviving an old thread, but somehow this thread seemed to fit quite well.

    I've just been building my first MTB since i was a kid. It's a Speedfox 01 that i got in the Comp Cyclist sales and i've been building it up with a mixed bag of components including BB7s and Ride-On sealed cables. I've built many road bikes in my time, but this is my first attempt at an MTB, so i'm feeling my way around a few new problems i've never encountered before (and feeling like an idiot).

    My question is about cable routing. Specifically, when routing down down tube and under the BB with the bolt on mounting clips and under the BB cable guide, how tight do the bolts need to be? I'm worried that fully tightening might effect shifting performance. Secondly, in the bag that the cable mounting clips/guides came in, there were two aluminium washer/spacers. I can't figure out what the hell they're for. I mulled over the idea that they were the solution to my last question, but they don't seem to work on either the downtube (leaves too little space for both cable housings to pass), or the BB cable guide (bolts to short to fit if they're used as washers). So......what are they for?

    Another quick question. Am i right in saying that the SF01 can't have 160mm rotors on the rear? At the mo, i've got 185mm's on the 74mm post mounts with no adapter in play. I guess that means it's not possible to use a 160mm?

    Hope someone understand what i'm talking about and can help.

    Many thanks

    Tollers

    Edit: Adding link to photo that illustrates the downtube clips and the BB cable guide tunder which the rear mech and rear brake housings pass. http://www.bikesandcomponents.com/We...64F/sf3_01.jpg

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/features/...or-2011/141061
    Last edited by tollers; 05-11-2011 at 12:21 PM.

  21. #21
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    Hi Tollers, welcome to MTBR!

    It's weird reading this thread again, I was such a noob back then . Anyway, I don't think you need to worry too much about the torque for the cable guides, my guess is that they should be tightened to about 3-4Nm. If you want to be extra sure though, send an e-mail off to BMC and they'll give you the torque values for all the bolts on the frame. As for the two washers, my only guess is that they are for the bottle cage mounting bolts.

    Looks like you're right about the rear brake, I doubt you can put anything smaller then a 185mm on there. I honestly think that's good though as I've been riding with a 185mm bb7 on my Trailfox and I find it doesn't lock up the rear wheel unless I want it to. The larger rotor also stays cooler on the descents, and it allows you to turn up the modulation on the speed dial lever which makes for a smaller lever throw.

    The Speedfox looks like an amazing frame, and if it handles anything like my Trailfox, than you will absolutely love it!

    If anyone's interested, I ended up going with Nokon cables for both the brakes and derailleurs and it's been working like a dream for the past two and a half years. I ended up swapping my 185 Roundagon front rotor for a 203 G3 Cleansweep, and I have to say, the power is amazing and it still has just enough modulation for smooth braking. I do all my braking with one finger, and if I want to, I can lock my front wheel with a good pull.

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