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  1. #51
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    looks pretty sweet in black/red. I was kind of annoyed they didn't allow you to choose that frame for the XTR build, but then again, the XTR build is absolutely amazing.

    I have around 200 miles on mine via the colorado front range trails (walker ranch, heil, hall ranch, betasso preserve).

    going -3 on rebound front/rear made a huge difference in small bump compliance and confidence--doesn't feel like a pogo stick anymore. of course, I like to run higher pressures (35psi) b/c I hate the bouncy tire feeling. so i'm sure that doesn't help.

    the bike climbs super efficiently and is allllllmost as efficient as my road bike. There's barely any pedal bob that you can't chalk up to lower tire pressures.

    run the tires at 35-40PSI w/ the suspension locked, and it's as snappy and responsive out of the saddle as a road bike (w/ big tires).

    the bike is super nimble, and I think it's the perfect set up w/ the 90mm stem. going back to my road bike feels horrible after getting use to the stiffness and immediate precision of the front end on this bike.

    not sure how yours feels with that 110 stem. does it make that much of a difference in keep the front wheel from wandering during super steep climbs?

    I see you upgraded to the kashima coated forks....

    what's that you have strapped to the front of your top tube?

  2. #52
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    I run my tires at about 21/23 psi because I ride trails. The 110 stem has been fine, I'm 6'6" so I had to have a bit longer stem. Yes, I did the upgrade because I wanted the Kashima but also the 3 position trail adjust feature which I've found to be real nice. On my top tube is a Backcountry Research strap with a tube, CO2 and tire lever. This was before the start of a 60mile race so I had 2 flat kits on the bike.
    BMC FS01 29 X0
    Redline Monocog 29
    Jamis Supernova
    Rocky Mtn Flow DJ

  3. #53
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    hmm...maybe i'll give the lower PSI a try. I'm definitely losing a lot of traction and getting knocked around in rock gardens.

    why not just carry the flat kits in your jersey?

    I can fit a spare bottle, a light jacket, arm warmers, 3 energy gel pouches, 2 spare tires, co2, levers, a pump, and my iphone in my LG jersey (3 pockets).

  4. #54
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    Yes, lower pressure will definitely help with traction. Work your way down slowly to see what you can tolerate, it's dependent on weight and riding style how low you can go.

    It's typically better to add extra weight on your bike than in your jersey. When it's in your jersey it's pulling on your shoulders all day and everytime you stand out of the saddle you're lifting that weight. You feel a whole lot better after 6 hours on the bike without a bunch of stuff in your pockets.
    BMC FS01 29 X0
    Redline Monocog 29
    Jamis Supernova
    Rocky Mtn Flow DJ

  5. #55
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    good point. maybe i'll get a seat bag. my damn jersey is starting to rip from all the weight!

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesm925 View Post
    good point. maybe i'll get a seat bag. my damn jersey is starting to rip from all the weight!
    Exactly! I think you will really feel the difference after several hours on the bike without your jersey pockets weighing you down and pulling on your shoulders the whole time. Glad I could help. Seat bags are nice because they will contain different things, but I prefer the straps to keep the essentials handy for quick access and it's not flopping around underneath my saddle, it's very tight and secure.
    BMC FS01 29 X0
    Redline Monocog 29
    Jamis Supernova
    Rocky Mtn Flow DJ

  7. #57
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    out of curiosity, how much sag are you running on your bike and what are you trails like (rocky, smooth etc) ?

    someone on here told me that running %25 sag on an xc bike will make it wallowy, and that 15-20 is much better.

    i'm in the front range of colorado, where it's very rocky. still, I do want my bike to be stiffer, especially when I have the suspension open...

  8. #58
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    I usually set my sag with the shock open to be just barely stiffer than the recommended line on the link. I keep the shock in Trail mode most of the time. If I'm racing a very smooth course I'll set the air pressure a little bit higher.
    BMC FS01 29 X0
    Redline Monocog 29
    Jamis Supernova
    Rocky Mtn Flow DJ

  9. #59
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    just got back from a ride. I set the shock and fork to 15% sag. HOLY CRAPOLA! It's like a different bike. Even in descent mode, the rear just refuses to squat or sag, and I can actually climb out of the saddle without bouncing like a madman.

    descent mode now has the the platform feel of trail mode set to really soft. The bike just scoots up the trail while climbing, especially in the saddle--in descent mode!

    In trail mode, it's just awesome. very efficient.

    I wasn't really seeing the whole anti-squat linkage design before. It just wallowed. Now the rear seems to stiffen up dramatically under power, but still remains plush on the downhills--exactly what you'd want an xc bike to do.

    I also played with the rebound damping a bit, but not by much. Surprisingly, the bike's small bump sensitivity seems to have dramatically improved. I'm not getting knock around as much, which seems counterintuitive to adding pressure to the fork and shock.

    i'm 158lbs without gear, and running 95psi in the rear and 90psi in the front, rebound dampening on front is 13 clicks positive (away from the slowest setting). In the rear, it's at 9 from the slowest setting.

  10. #60
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    how do you like the longer stem on your bike? I feel like I could definitely be a bit more stretched out on the bike.

    Did it negatively affect the DH handling of the bike?

  11. #61
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    The Fourstroke is a beautiful bike. Seems perfect for everything I have on my mind. Just that I just got a BMC TeamElite 02 (the older 26er version) less than a year ago and a student's budget doesn't permit a new bike every year, but if I could I'd go with the XO version of this one… well… after I finished studying MAYBE I can get it then

  12. #62
    Always pushing harder!!!
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    Mine's on the way!!! Should have it before next weekend rolls around.

  13. #63
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    Wanted to give everybody a heads up who owns an FS01 to a problem I recently discovered. The rear shift cable housing runs down the top tube then is internally routed through the chainstay to the rear derailleur. Where the cable enters the chainstay just behind the BB, there is no protection for the carbon from the cable housing moving due to suspension movement. Over less than a year of riding, mine has significantly worn through the carbon and created a large hole. I would recommend putting something in place to stop the wear on the carbon. Ideas I had were some of the snap on frame protectors from Jagwire or Sram (Amazon.com: SRAM Frame Protector for Brake and Shift Cable Housing (Set of 4): Sports & Outdoors , Amazon.com: Jagwire Tube Tops 3G, Housing Covers/Frame Protectors, Black, Bag/4: Sports & Outdoors), or a cable boot such as used on a v-brake (Amazon.com: Pyramid Cable Boot V-Brake Rubber Black: Sports & Outdoors). Share any other ideas or solutions you find.

    Here's the wear on my frame. This should be a small hole approximately sized to match the cable. I have reported this to my dealer and they're passing to BMC, we will see what they say. This really should have been installed with a grommet in place.

    2013 Fourstroke FS01 29-bmc-swingarm-1.jpg

    2013 Fourstroke FS01 29-bmc-swingarm-2.jpg
    BMC FS01 29 X0
    Redline Monocog 29
    Jamis Supernova
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  14. #64
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    9 655 gr.






  15. #65
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    nice rig! hard chioce between Turner CZAR & FS01

  16. #66
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    Re: 2013 Fourstroke FS01 29

    +/- 400 grams and vpp vs dw suspension
    12 Anthem X29
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    07 Epic Marathon carbon
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  17. #67
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    Very nice.
    2014 S-Works Epic WC
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  18. #68
    Cassoulet forever !
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    Quote Originally Posted by rapsac View Post
    +/- 400 grams and vpp vs dw suspension
    DWlink is as VPP suspension too. But if you refer to the commercial VPP term, then the BMC is not one of them.

    In fact the FS is more like a first gen DWlink, whereas the TF is more like last generation DWlink
    Frenchspeaking 29"ers community site http://VingtNeuf.org

  19. #69
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    I did a first 35km ride on my new Fourstroke. It is not a FS01, but FS02 with alloy rear triangle. Size large, 2013 model. This is my first 29", first full-suspension bike and first carbon bike. Learning to ride the bike and feel it will probably take some time.

    I've already done some modifications. Replaced the flat handlebar with Easton XC70 lowriser bar. It is little bit narrower (680 vs 720mm), 100gr lighter, but most imprtantly rises the brake levers and shifters higher, so they cannot hit the top tube in case of crash. The stock wheels were DT Swiss X1800 with 350 hubs and weighted 2080gr. I rebuilt them with Sapim D-light spokes, Sapim alloy nipples and WTB KOM rims. The final weight is 1690gr. I'm running the original Onza Canis tires tubless. Wheel rebuild and tubeless setup saved me more than 600gr of rotational mass. I replaced the saddle with Selle SMP Avant. I wanted the saddle further back so I replaced the original Easton XC70 seatpost with Fizik Cyrano alloy seatpost that had some setback.

    Final weight with Look Quartz pedals is 11.55kg. The weight is identical to the weight of my 26" alloy hardtail that I have been riding last four years. Also, the weight of the wheelset is identical. The front end of two bikes is very similar - the position of handlebars in relation to bottom bracket is identical. But Fourstroke has steeper seatpost that puts the saddle too forward for me. Therefore I must use the seatpost with setback and slide the saddle quite backward to get good riding position.

    Given this similarity between bikes it was very surprising how different the new bike felt.

    On the positive side the new bike was very easy to steer. Old bike was quite nervous. New bike was much better on the rougher sections - on the rooty trails and downhill sections. There was almost no need to get out of saddle and it felt safer to descend at faster speed. Rooty climbs also felt little bit easier.

    On the negative side the new bike felt little bit dull. I'm not completely sure what caused this and if I can adequately describe it. I think that it did not response as sharply to acceleration as old bike did.

    I'll first play with the rear suspension settings. Perhaps I was running the rear shock too soft. Or perhaps the Onza Canis tires are just slower than the Rocket Rons that I've used so far. I might try to swap the tires. Or perhaps it is just the bigger inertia of the 29er wheels.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2013 Fourstroke FS01 29-afterfirst.jpg  


  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by arnea View Post
    On the negative side the new bike felt little bit dull. I'm not completely sure what caused this and if I can adequately describe it. I think that it did not response as sharply to acceleration as old bike did.

    I'll first play with the rear suspension settings. Perhaps I was running the rear shock too soft. Or perhaps the Onza Canis tires are just slower than the Rocket Rons that I've used so far. I might try to swap the tires. Or perhaps it is just the bigger inertia of the 29er wheels.
    I think that the dullness was caused by too low shock pressure. I weight ~95kg and was running the shock at 150psi. Shock was much better at 190psi, but not as plush as I wanted. 180psi was good for small bumps and bike was still "sharp". On the negative side it went through travel too easily. BTW, I was running the shock and fork in descend mode.

    There is quite good analysis of the Fourstroke suspension here: BMC Fourstroke 29'' 2013 - Linkage Design

    The leverage ratio increases at the end of stroke - this counteracts the natural progressivness of the air shock so the resulting force graph is almost linear. Interesting what was the thinking behind this linkage design?

    For more progressive linkage, I installed the spacer into the air chamber. Fox allows to use only 0.2 cubic inch spacer in this shock. 0.4 spacer would reduce the air chamber too much. I made my own 0.3 cubic inch spacer and also reduced the pressure to 170psi. Rear suspension feels now much better - more plush and did not bottom out on bigger hits. And the bike still felt "sharp".

    I will also make fork more progressive by adding some extra Float fluid to fork's air chamber and reducing the air pressure little bit.

  21. #71
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    Saddle position

    I have a question regarding the saddle fore-aft positioning.

    I found that with stock seatpost the saddle was still too forward even when it was pushed as far back as possible. And I'm using Selle SMP saddle that has very long rails.

    In this position there was still too much pressure on the hands.

    I switched to setback seatpost to get the saddle into good position (saddle nose is ~11cm from bottom bracket) that does not put extra pressure on my wrists. BTW, now I have exactly same setup as I had on my old bike.

    I've attached the picture of my saddle and seatpost. I'm 6'3" (191cm) and weight 230 lbs in full gear (105kg). The saddle is about ~5cm backwards from the "normal" position where the straight seatpost would put it.

    I'm little bit worried - is such a rearward position still safe for frame?

    Interestingly the front end of the bike has good dimensions - reach and stack suite me. Only the saddle is too forward. I looked around and it seems that most of the bikes in this segment have even steeper seatposts than Fourstroke.

    What is your experience with the saddle positioning?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2013 Fourstroke FS01 29-setback.jpg  


  22. #72
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    try to longer your stem, the stock stem shown in the picture looks doenst fit you heigh. You cant just put back the saddle, it can be dangerous to you and your bike

  23. #73
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    Something else is not right in that you need 11cm of saddle setback to alleviate pressure on your wrists. That is more extreme than most pros on their road bikes, who tend to run a lot of setback in the first place:

    http://weightweenies.starbike.com/fo...?f=14&t=110418

    Do you have any other pictures of your setup? What's your true inseam measurement?

  24. #74
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    Thank you for the help xuzuohang and savechief. Thanks for the Weightweenies link. I will read this thread.

    First of all, some pictures:




    I tried the Fizik alloy seatpost with setback, but decided not to use it. It's diameter was just a little bit too small and it was knocking in the seattube. I put back the stock Easton EC70 seatpost and also moved the saddle little bit forward as you can see in the picture.

    Right now the saddle height is 80-81 cm from BB, saddle to handlebars drop is 5cm, distance from handlebars to saddle nose is 60cm and from BB to saddle nose 9.5cm.

    My own measurements are: height 191cm (6'3"), inseam 94cm (37"), arms 72cm (28").

    I followed xuzuohang advice and used longer stem. 90mm instead of 70mm. It felt better on the road. The hands were resting on the handlebars with the upper part of palm (next to fingers) being the main contact point and there was less pressure. With stock stem the lower part of palm (next to wrist) was in contact with handlebars and it felt as if I was pushing the handlebars forward. Also - pressure is not unbearable, just uncomfortable.

    But on the trail the longer stem was not so good. With the stock stem the bike has very nice handling - very stable and precise. With longer stem it was not so sensitive in the middle, but bit nervous when the handlebars were turned more. Also it felt that there was too much weight on the front wheel.

    The bike is nice for shorter trips on the trail as it is, but I would like to use it also for longer events like multi-day adventure races and are bit worried about the possible uncomfort.

    My next plan is to try little bit longer and steeper stem that would put me little bit more upright position and move the CG back little bit. Something like 75-80mm and 10-12 degrees.

    BTW how far back can one safely move the saddle? I'm afraid that the extra leverage might damage the frame when landing hard.

  25. #75
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    arnea, think about these: 1.wider handelbar (flat)
    2.fork preload(some fox fork need to change preload spring to hold big weight rider)
    3.shock preload
    4.longer saddle(like some road saddle can help rider adj their CG move forward or back)


    I think the problem is you cant get stretch on you bike, if you keep sit backward, you knee cant keep in line from the axle of pedal, then all the pressure gathering on your back and arm .

    If your LBS got a fitting equipment ,you best have a try than wasting money to buy different parts.

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