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  1. #1
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    2010 Trailfox TF02..what to expect?

    Looking at a 2010 Trailfox 02. Opinions? What can I expect? Strengths and weaknesses?

  2. #2
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    Well what kind of riding do you plant to do? The bike is good but it has some cheap parts on it. The wheel set stinks for a trail bike the cassette is crap the chain is crap the bars stem and seat post are heavy but everything else is ok. It is a good frame you could upgrade later. The suspension design is very good but the bike is heavy because of the low spec parts on it.
    All in all its a great bike for the money just need a few upgrades but thats the fun part.

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    I love my 09 Trailfox and had the 07 Trailfox before it. I have ridden the horst link suspension frames for years and couldn't believe the ride feel when I moved to this suspension design. For me this bike really smooths out the trail. The bike tracks well and is very stiff. I do not feel bob or loss of power when climbing. I built the 07 and 09 up from the frame and for a trail bike I am in the 27 lb range which I feel is pretty good. I tested a Pivot before I moved into the 09 trailfox just to compare the suspension designs and see if the Pivot was that much better. The Pivot did seem a little snappier on the climb but I give BMC the edge on the decent. Overall the BMC felt better to me. I really like the plush feel of the suspension and am pleased with sticking with this frame.

  4. #4
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    I feel the same as Revel 1911 I love my bmc the suspension is the best.

  5. #5
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    Is there a need to upgrade the shock to rp23?
    What is the dimension of the shock for the 2009 TF02?

    thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by HotzKiss
    Is there a need to upgrade the shock to rp23?
    What is the dimension of the shock for the 2009 TF02?

    thanks
    If it is an RP2 on there, then I see no need for an RP23. Even my 2009 TF01 which has 20mm more suspension (same suspension design) hardly needs any platform. For those long smooth uphills the platform mode of the RP2 does perfectly well. Unfortunately I don't know the shock size for the TF02, my TF01 is probably different.

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    I agree with cascades, I can't imagine a RP23 would make that much of a difference. I wish I could say that I have ridden mine with an RP23 to provide greater insight but I haven't. However, I have a DT Swiss shock from my older Trailfox frame that I put on the newer frame just to see how it felt. The DT has a small volume so it has a more linear feel to it and I can say that I preferred the feel of the RP2. The shock dimensions are 200mm with a 55mm stroke.

  8. #8
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    my shock is float R, i think rp2 should be good enough.

    Has anyone try a rock shox monach ?

    Which model to get low tune medium high tune?

    thanks
    Last edited by HotzKiss; 03-25-2011 at 06:59 AM.

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    I just bought the 2010 TF02 from competitive cycling and Im pretty excited after hearing from other bmc owners. I was just wondering about the rear shock also. The 2010 model comes with a float r(not sure why they downgraded since last year) and I wondered if there is a big difference between the float r and the rp2?

  10. #10
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    I would call them and tell them to change it so you can have pro pedal. CC will upgrade it for you I dont think that the floatr has pro pedal. I was out on my trail fox yesterday and I use the pro pedal alot its great for climbing and riding on the road it almost locks out the rear.

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    from my understanding the float r has propedal but it is factory set for the specific frame. The rp2 and rp23 have the ability to change the propedal setting with the blue level on the shock or turn the propedal off completely.

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    Pro pedal on my bike is almost like a lock out option for the back and i have a rp2

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    Pro pedal is basically a form of low speed compression damping, which is set to a default base setting for each shock, be it Float R, RP2 or RP23 (you want some compression damping). The difference between these shocks comes down to options @ ride time.
    - The R is just what it is, factory preset.
    - The RP2 has two factory presets, one with little compression damping and one with more compression damping (the Pro Pedal setting)
    - The RP23 still has the same default ride quality as the factory default when the Pro Pedal is off, but has the additional feature (wrt RP2) to select the 'hardness' of the Pro Pedal setting (selection out of three presets).

    Now, if you never use the Pro Pedal option of your shock, you'd be equally fine with an R as an RP23 as they are as far as I know the same shock in the default setting (given that they have the same tuning). So the question boils down to: "do you need a Pro Pedal option?". I am for one perfectly fine without a Pro Pedal on my 2009 TF01 (I would not be on every other bike though). The BMC suspension design bobs very little, so little that it doesn't bother me (but that is me).

    By the way a German test with Christopher Sauser showed that an active suspension is faster (w.r.t. a locked out suspension) in almost any condition except for smooth asphalt, even for fire road gravel. The test result was in contradiction with what Sauser himself expected from the 'feeling'.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by cascades
    Pro pedal is basically a form of low speed compression damping, which is set to a default base setting for each shock, be it Float R, RP2 or RP23 (you want some compression damping). The difference between these shocks comes down to options @ ride time.
    - The R is just what it is, factory preset.
    - The RP2 has two factory presets, one with little compression damping and one with more compression damping (the Pro Pedal setting)
    - The RP23 still has the same default ride quality as the factory default when the Pro Pedal is off, but has the additional feature (wrt RP2) to select the 'hardness' of the Pro Pedal setting (selection out of three presets).

    Now, if you never use the Pro Pedal option of your shock, you'd be equally fine with an R as an RP23 as they are as far as I know the same shock in the default setting (given that they have the same tuning). So the question boils down to: "do you need a Pro Pedal option?". I am for one perfectly fine without a Pro Pedal on my 2009 TF01 (I would not be on every other bike though). The BMC suspension design bobs very little, so little that it doesn't bother me (but that is me).

    By the way a German test with Christopher Sauser showed that an active suspension is faster (w.r.t. a locked out suspension) in almost any condition except for smooth asphalt, even for fire road gravel. The test result was in contradiction with what Sauser himself expected from the 'feeling'.
    I will agree with the part that a active suspension is faster in almost every condition except for smooth ground. if I am on smooth ground pedaling alot I turn on the pro pedal and it stiffens up the rear to almost lock but still has a little cushion. I love my fs bike I dont think I will ever got to a ht again. I do most of my riding in the forest and you cant compare as far as handling I am faster in almost every way than my ht buddies.

    as far as the float rp2 I have a switch if I switch it it get almost locked out I love this option for climbing and pedaling hard on smooth trails. I would not be happy with my suspension if I did not have the option of turning it off with a switch. The bmc has a very plush suspension but when you stand and pound hard you get some bob and when you are on smooth ground you dont need this. I think the propedal switch option is very important

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    Agreed that even a BMC bobs when standing and pounding (I haven't been on a full susser that doesn't), I am lazy with these kinds of things and most of the time don't use the PP switch. But this is totally personal and I can totally see other people having a different riding style. Maybe when I get back to longer climbs in the Alps (this summer, I can't wait ...) that I will use the PP switch. Only the OP knows his riding style.

  16. #16
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    if you dont use the pp than its fine I like my pp its all about riding style.

  17. #17
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    rear suspension

    so I just got my 2010 trailfox02 in from competitive cyclists and its great. I was just wondering about setup of the rear suspension. There are markings on the rear triangle that say hard and soft with tic marks in between, and on the seat tube where it intersects the rear triangle it says initial load indicator. anyone know what this is? I read all through the manuals and nothings on it. thanks for help

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by salsa smurf
    so I just got my 2010 trailfox02 in from competitive cyclists and its great. I was just wondering about setup of the rear suspension. There are markings on the rear triangle that say hard and soft with tic marks in between, and on the seat tube where it intersects the rear triangle it says initial load indicator. anyone know what this is? I read all through the manuals and nothings on it. thanks for help
    I'm considering the same deal from competitive cyclist. With the price down to $1250, it seems like the best deal out there. I ride a 2,400 mountain behind my house. 4.2 miles, mostly 8 to 24% gradient. Fireroad and single track. The top of mountain fire roads are getting pretty rocky and rough from rock exposure over the years. I'm looking for an all purpose bike just to ride to complement my road fitness. So I need something that climbs well, handles well at slow and medium speeds, has decent brakes and decent suspension to handle the rocky fire roads and rutted singletrack. I think the BMC trailfox will be ok, although I've read that some people are not impressed with the Deore brakes having fading issues. Unfortunately, because of the steepness of the road and number of hikers, I usually have to ride the brakes the entire 4.2 miles down. Any opinon on the bike based on your experience would be appreciated. Thanks

  19. #19
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    @salsa smurf: The indicator is a sag marking to make it easier to get to the right amount of sag on the rear suspension. While sitting on your bike in normal riding position you have to line up the marking on the seat tube with the position on the scale that suits your riding style. Line it up with soft and you will have more sag; line it up with hard and you'll have less. This does away with the need to measure sag on the shock and is very helpful indeed.

    @wk1: I have no experience with Deore brakes; the BMC frame is very capable I can assure you. If the brakes turn out to fade you have two options: buy other brakes or start with an increased disc size (=much cheaper), especially on the front (go for 200/203). You might also try other pads. Fading is a complex matter, there are multiple causes. Disc size and pad compound for sure have a large influence on it. Caliper design is in most cases such that they try to isolate heat from the caliper to prevent boiling the fluid (this is technically not fading, but a vapor lock which results in an even more fatal brake failure). This means that it is the disc and pad that have to deal with most of the heat and thus is fading mostly an equation of these two elements. Take care though that some brake pads lead to much more risk of a vapor lock (sintered more than organic compound; and stay away from aluminum backed pads). The thing you can't correct without changing brakes is the amount of force that is applied to the pad/disc interaction for a given amount of finger pressure and the shape of the brake pad, which also has influence on the braking performance.

  20. #20
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    So Ive had my 2010 trailfox and its a great bike. Just one concern, I noticed a subtle creak that sounded like it was coming from the crank/bottom bracket although I cant be sure.(this is only while pedaling hard up a decently steep hill, which is why I think its the crank or BB) I hope it isnt coming from the joints of the frame. Im going to try and take the crank off inspect it and re grease it and see if that changes anything. Competitive cyclists said that it could just be a break in time or the nature of the frame but they sounded pretty confident that there wasnt any issue with the function of the bike or assembly problems. If anyone has any tips or experience with something like this please let me know your advice. for now its just the annoyance of the creaking.

  21. #21
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    Maybe the cassette is loose I had a creak and it was a loose worn cassette.
    What fork do you have I had a fox fork that would make noise when I was pedaling hard up hill. Could be lots of stuff that you would not expect

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by salsa smurf
    So Ive had my 2010 trailfox and its a great bike. Just one concern, I noticed a subtle creak that sounded like it was coming from the crank/bottom bracket although I cant be sure.(this is only while pedaling hard up a decently steep hill, which is why I think its the crank or BB) I hope it isnt coming from the joints of the frame. Im going to try and take the crank off inspect it and re grease it and see if that changes anything. Competitive cyclists said that it could just be a break in time or the nature of the frame but they sounded pretty confident that there wasnt any issue with the function of the bike or assembly problems. If anyone has any tips or experience with something like this please let me know your advice. for now its just the annoyance of the creaking.
    Check you quick releases front and rear. Take them out and apply a little grease to them. Make sure they are tight.

  23. #23
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    check your crank bolts

  24. #24
    wk1
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    Trailfox creaking

    Quote Originally Posted by salsa smurf
    So Ive had my 2010 trailfox and its a great bike. Just one concern, I noticed a subtle creak that sounded like it was coming from the crank/bottom bracket although I cant be sure.(this is only while pedaling hard up a decently steep hill, which is why I think its the crank or BB) I hope it isnt coming from the joints of the frame. Im going to try and take the crank off inspect it and re grease it and see if that changes anything. Competitive cyclists said that it could just be a break in time or the nature of the frame but they sounded pretty confident that there wasnt any issue with the function of the bike or assembly problems. If anyone has any tips or experience with something like this please let me know your advice. for now its just the annoyance of the creaking.

    Check your seat post seat clamp bolts, both the vertical locking bolt and the horizontal bolt. I had some creaking noise there when I adjusted the saddle angle and didn't torque the bolt tight enough. Only creaked when I was peddling hard in the saddle on steep climbs.

  25. #25
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    thanks for all the help. I figured out the the seat has a little creak which I really care about cause it doesnt effect the function of the bike but i also found a different creak coming from a bolt the holds the rear triangle on. This was a little tricky because they have torque settings that are important to be right because the bolt cant be to tight because there is movement from the rear suspension. I just loosened the bolt half a turn and then tightened it a half turn back.. the noise was gone! I trying to research whether or not I should grease the bolt but for not its silent and the bike is now perfect in every way. I love the bike for all those who are considering it!

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