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  1. #26
    Climbs = necessary evil
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleTrackLovr View Post
    I was really sold on the Geigerrig pressurized bag system after watching the youtube video of the guy throwing one out the window of a car at 90mph and it did not break.



    However after less than a year of service one of my bags developed a leak from simple rubbing in my pack.

    Did you request a warranty replacement? They are supposed to be lifetime on the bladder and I'd like to know how they were to deal with. I love mine so far!

  2. #27
    I'm your density
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    One of probably several MYOG threads on gravity filters: http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-...thread_id=8994

    I've used one similar to what's in that thread for a few 100+ mile hikes on the PCT, quite successfully. It uses one of the Walmart dry sacks and the filter cartridge is mounted internally. I love being able to get other camp chores done while water filters unattended (vs. manually pumping several gallons for a small group camp). Just need to be careful about managing the clean end of the system, i.e., not contaminating the outlet hose or letting unfiltered water dribble down into your bottle/hydra pack.

    Depending on where I'm at, Aquamira drops are used for back up.
    "Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left."
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  3. #28
    ColoradoCoolBreeze
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogerfromco View Post
    Did you request a warranty replacement? They are supposed to be lifetime on the bladder and I'd like to know how they were to deal with. I love mine so far!
    No I did not. A lifetime warranty doesn't help you on the trail with no water and a bag that leaks. I guess I could have turned it in and them sold it but I'm not that kinda guy.

    For me it was just better to go back to something I trusted. Just know they aren't bulletproof and have a back up plan.

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  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aushiker View Post


    As Sawyer Squeeze user I thought I would share my thoughts/experience. I purchased the Sawyer Squeeze to use on my 3,000 km Chasing the Dirt tour.
    Hey,

    Seems you like the Sawyer filter itself, though the bags (from you and others) seem pretty suspect.

    I've found divided information on what other water bladders can be used with the filter. Does a regular small-mouth Platypus bladder fit the filter? Or should I get one of the Evernew bladders you linked to, if using the Sawyer?

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aushiker View Post

    As Sawyer Squeeze user I thought I would share my thoughts/experience. I purchased the Sawyer Squeeze to use on my 3,000 km Chasing the Dirt tour.

    What I learnt:

    (1) Sawyer Products don't tell you on their website well they didn't when I purchased the Squeeze that they DO NOT warrant the pouches. I found this out via a piece of paper in the box after I purchased the product. For me I found this quite disturbing and in my view shows a lack of integrity on the behalf of Sawyer Products. I guess I am used to consumer laws which would not allow this to happen.

    (2) Sawyer Products will, if you put the pressure on them, allow for the return of damaged pouches for inspection; however keep in mind that their standard response appears to be that damaged is caused by users, i.e., squeezing too hard. If they come to this conclusion then you have wasted your time sending the pouches back. I haven't bothered with mine as I don't trust Sawyer Products to properly inspect the pouch.

    (3) I made an error of judgement and took only one pouch with me which failed with minimal use (seam started leaking). I don't believe I squeezed it to hard and in fact I am struggling to see how one can do that without standing on it or something along those lines. So I would suggest if you are using the Sawyer Squeeze pouches take spares.

    (4) Because I only took one pouch I had to go without filtration (my bad).

    (5) The filter itself is easy to use and seems to work well based on my use. Put it this way I didn't get sick

    (6) I have since learnt that should one buy one of these Sawyer Squeeze systems that the smart thing to do is dump the pouches and replace them with Evernew Water Carry pouches. Something to keep in mind when considering the purchase.

    Personally I will keep using mine but with Evernew Water Carry pouches as I have the filter but I wouldn't purchase from Sawyer Products again. Their "ethics" just don't sit well with me.

    It seems that what I experienced is not uncommon going by the discussion at BackpackingLight forums.
    Regards
    Andrew
    Did you know that you can screw it onto pretty much any pop bottle? That your never more then 50 feet from, unfortunately. And the best option in my opinion is the inline kit. I just carry a bag as a backup. I actually have never even used my bags now that I think about it.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_papa_nuts View Post
    Did you know that you can screw it onto pretty much any pop bottle? That your never more then 50 feet from, unfortunately.
    Can't recall 100% but I think I did try it with a 1.5 litre bottle that I had with me and it didm't screw on well and hence leaked.

    Given the remoteness of my location at the time, options where limited to what I had with me. No shops out there; carrying water for five days says volumes

    Andrew

  7. #32
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    Here's a blog post for a gravity filter I put together this evening, using the cartridge from a Sawyer 0.1 micron filter bottle, a 4 liter Walmart dry bag, miscellaneous plastic fittings and silicone tubing.

    Lightweight Hiking and Bikepacking Gear, Techniques and General Musings: 161g 4L Gravity Filter

    169 grams (6 oz.) field weight.
    "Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left."
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  8. #33
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    if you might encounter water with lots of junk that needs to be filtered out (i.e., tannins), stay away from paper filters. The cleanable ceramic filters will require lots of cleaning if you're using them with dirty water, but it's nice that they allow that option. I use the msr miniworks ex, which is a good price on amazon. You have to make sure the filter doesn't get cracked from being frozen or impacts, but otherwise they're good for a long time. I attach my camelback tube to the outgoing end and fill that way.

  9. #34
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    Shame Amazon wont ship MSR products to Australia. I'm real keen for a Miniworks.
    Forum member Wildwazza recommends a coffee filter wrapped around the "pick-up" and secured with a rubber band to reduce sediment clogging the filter. Miniworks is next on my wishlist with a maintenance kit and a helinox chair.
    Australia's Leading Ultra light Camping Chairs | Sitting is Believing

    Update:
    Impluse buy which arnt usually a good idea.
    Just grabbed a miniworks off (used) of ebay.
    Hopefully its ok.
    I'll grab a maintenence kit for it and give it a strip down and seal refurbish.
    Hopefully the element is in good nick.
    ebay.com.au/itm/151074573160
    Last edited by rifraf; 07-09-2013 at 12:25 AM.

  10. #35
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    the msr sweet water is field servicable and has my vote

  11. #36
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    Surprised to see this thread bumped back up!



    I guess it gives me a chance to update though I ended up getting the Katadyn Hiker Pro and now have 5-6 trips on it in the last 7 months. The filter pumps relatively easily and fills a standard water bottle quickly(maybe a minute?) and a 100oz Camelbak bladder in just a couple minutes at most. I've yet to clean/replace the filter but its still easy to pump. I've mostly used it in spring fed rivers or directly from spring basins, but have occasionally used it in black water rivers full of tannins. It doesn't filter out all the tannins, but does reduce it down to a mild tea - lol. Seems clean, and I've found nothing on the interwebs to say that ingesting a little tannic acid with my water may be incredibly detrimental to my health.

    These things are not made to deal with salt, but it seems as there really isn't a low cost option for that unless you are ingenious enough to DIY. As a lot of my biking is along the coast, its something I have to watch out for and plan around fresh water sources with consistant positive outflow that don't reverse with the tides.

    I fabricated an aluminum carry-all bracket for my bike that fits the Katadyn just fine(and can also fit a full JetBoil kit, or anything else up to the size of a 2 liter).



    The Hiker Pro has been a great buy, very functional, priced well, and would recommend it to anyone would preffer a little extra ruggedness and value from a product rather than lowest possible weight and size.

  12. #37
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    Water filtration vs Water purification

    I just got the kataydin (bad spelling) vario. It seems nice and I'm looking forward to using it soon.

    Thanks everyone, this thread was a awesome insight and I've learned a ton.

    Bill

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by rifraf View Post
    Update:
    Just grabbed a miniworks off (used) of ebay.
    Hopefully the element is in good nick.
    when using it, if it seems like you're not pumping much water, it's probably a dirty filter. Even when clean you will see that a little water goes back down the intake, but it gets more pronounced as the filter gets dirty and the same pressure pushes less water through. Clean the filter. I just use my hand for most cleaning, since it seems like this will wear the filter down less than regularly using the included scrub pad.

    pumping tannin water would seeme like it might be a good way to test for any invisible cracks. Not sure if those exist, though. Pure speculation.

  14. #39
    SpoK Werks Handmade Goods
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    Water filtration vs Water purification

    Steripen with a pre-filter. It's never failed me yet.

  15. #40
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    Second the steripen

    Quote Originally Posted by 1 Speed View Post
    Steripen with a pre-filter. It's never failed me yet.
    This. If the water is very silty (Colorado and Green rivers come to mind), alum to let things settle out before pre-filtering. I've had poor luck with pump filters.
    The older I get the better I was...

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by veloborealis View Post
    This. If the water is very silty (Colorado and Green rivers come to mind), alum to let things settle out before pre-filtering. I've had poor luck with pump filters.
    I've used the pre-filter in some pretty sketchy cow ponds and stagnant water. If you're relatively careful (taking the water from the surface) it helps to keep the sediment from entering and possibly clogging the filter. FYI - it's a Steripen pre-filter which detaches so you can insert the Steripen or for cleaning. I was actually surprised myself how well the system worked. I use it with a 1 liter collapsible Nalgene bottle (so I can roll it up and put it in my frame bag) and then pour the good water into my bottles or Osprey bladder. Here's what I have - SteriPEN Classic portable uv water purifier with Pre-Filter and the kit came with the pre-filter.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbphilly View Post
    Does a regular small-mouth Platypus bladder fit the [Sawyer] filter?
    Yes. It's also the same size and threading as the old standard two-liter soda bottles you find in most grocery stores. (Possible way out of a jam.)

  18. #43
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    Best, cheapest pre-filter I have found were the ones made for home-brew biofuels. Pretty cheap and you can get them in various densities. Some will remove almost all silt, but it takes time to let gravity do it's job.

    After that, I use a filter like most guys use above.
    - The only thing that keeps me on a bike is happiness.

  19. #44
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    Glad the line of discussion about a "cheap, easy" way to desalinate water was debunked early.

    If you have salty water to deal with on a bikepacking trip, your best bet will probably be to carry what you need and cache water where you can before the trip. Hikers have been doing this stuff for ages.

    Also, WRT tannins, you can't "filter" them out as some have suggested. Tannins are dissolved chemicals (organic acids) in the water, which is why clear water can be colored by tannins. A paper filter won't remove them, but neither will a ceramic one. What WILL remove them is activated charcoal or a carbon core in a filter. This works by a process called adsorption where the tannins stick to the activated charcoal. The charcoal has a finite capacity for this, however, and if you are filtering from tannin-rich waters frequently, it will probably reach capacity before the rest of the filter wears out. You can get some of the adsorption capacity back by boiling the filter.

    I use an MRS Miniworks EX, and while heavy, does all I need. I boil the ceramic cartridges after a trip and let them air dry. Does a couple of things: kills all the bugs that were filtered out of my water on a trip and are now sticking to the filter element, and then gets some of the chemicals that have been adsorbed on the carbon core to release and give the carbon core a longer lifespan.

    For where I live and need to draw water, a pump is almost a necessity most of the year. Only during wetter times of year is enough water flowing in many streams to draw without a pump. During much of the year, a pump is required to access the scant supplies. And this time of year, a pump might not be enough...you have to cache water. This is the biggest reason I still use a heavy pump.

    I use a prefilter on my pump, too. They're called coffee filters, and they keep the largest sediment from clogging the ceramic element. They're dirt cheap. A couple of times, however, I've filtered water with such fine sediment that my element has still clogged in spite of the coffee filters. For those occasions, I've thought about also carrying some finer filter paper only for use in really challenging situations. It's more expensive, though, and I'd probably not use it in every case unless I could find a really good price.

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