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  1. #26
    is buachail foighneach me
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Desert Walker View Post
    That sounds cool, got any pics? I like the wood stove that selfpropelled devo uses in this video, Complete with stove pipe. Kifaru 4 man tipi with stove - YouTube I have been thinking about making a little woodstove for a long time, just never got around to it.
    No photos right now, but it's a smaller version of this, with some slight modifications to the design:

    How to make a wood gas stove - YouTube

    I added a second row of holes below the upper intake holes on the inner can. I also removed the bottom of the outer can so that I could access it with my hole puncher, and it makes it easier to attach little cat food can wings I made for stability on snow. I went smaller to save weight, and because I only need it for rarely melting snow on longer winter trips.

  2. #27
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    Another meth head

    I hadn't posted here yet, but was really excited to see a bikepacking forum get added.
    I made some alcohol stoves to take to a bike/outdoors gear swap meet here in Tempe, AZ. (the last picture is supposed to be a stick figure... nothing else)

    Stoves gone wild-cans.jpg

    Stoves gone wild-shavings.jpg

    Stoves gone wild-finished-product.jpg

  3. #28
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    Sean, do you have any issues with the steel cans rusting after the first several burns?

    DM

  4. #29
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    For trips in mild weather, I like the convenience of canister fuel stoves. My go-to kit is a Snow Peak GigaPower stove and a 700 ml titanium mug with a lid and folding handles. When the temperature dips below freezing or I am headed somewhere that canisters may not be available, I grab an MSR Whisperlite International. The canister stoves start flickering out around 20-25 degrees Fahrenheit. The white gas stoves, like the Whisperlite, only have a weight savings over canister stoves if you are on very extended expeditions--like 3 weeks or more--and even then the savings isn't much.

    And one benefit of canister stoves over alcohol stoves is the ability to turn it off and pack it up immediately.

  5. #30
    is buachail foighneach me
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    Quote Originally Posted by donmeredith74 View Post
    Sean, do you have any issues with the steel cans rusting after the first several burns?

    DM
    Not yet, but I'm sure they will eventually. It only takes about 30 minutes to make another and they're basically free, so no sweat if/when it does. I had a chance to use it head to head against an MSR International a few days ago on the Yentna River. From set up to warm water, the MSR melted snow down to almost 40 oz of water in about the time the wood stove melted snow down to about 20 oz of water. If speed and efficiency when in operation is the main goal, the real stoves kick ass. I ran mine on some small branches I broke up a few hours earlier while taking a break. The stove would have run for another 20 minutes or so on the handful of twigs I put in it.
    Last edited by sean salach; 03-05-2012 at 06:43 PM.

  6. #31
    is buachail foighneach me
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Desert Walker View Post
    That sounds cool, got any pics? I like the wood stove that selfpropelled devo uses in this video, Complete with stove pipe. Kifaru 4 man tipi with stove - YouTube I have been thinking about making a little woodstove for a long time, just never got around to it.
    Alright, just finished making one for my roommate, so I have new and used photos now.

    This is what it looks like 'brand new', and one photo of a stove I've used several times, and rolled in snow to quickly cool it down before putting it away. The end caps are just cat food can lids you can buy at any supermarket, and the pot stand nests in the bottom. I recommend using an MSR style aluminum stove support if using it on snow.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Stoves gone wild-woodstove01sm.jpg  

    Stoves gone wild-woodstove02sm.jpg  

    Stoves gone wild-woodstove03sm.jpg  

    Stoves gone wild-woodstove04sm.jpg  

    Stoves gone wild-woodstove05sm.jpg  


  7. #32
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    I have a Esbit Pocket Stove. Small an light, works great for heating water for coffee or warming up your dehydrated food.

  8. #33
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    I really like the looks of this set up from bikepacking.net:

    8.5oz Bikepacking Kitchen

    There are some cool stove projects on instructables.com - here's one:

    Pocket Alcohol Stove - "Jet Stove" (Camper's Guide)

    Steve Z
    Pedaling when it's dry
    And paddling when it's wet

    My insignificant blog:
    http://swampboy62.blogspot.com/

  9. #34
    I'm your density
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    This weekend I made a "Mini Zen Chimney/Sideburner Stove" out of 1 Red Bull drink can (about halfway down on this page). Weight = 7g.

    I paired it with a conical windscreen made using the template calculations on this page under "Making Your Own Cone Shaped Pot Stand." The screen material is from a disposable aluminum baking pan. Weight = 24g.

    The pot stand will be a pair of Ti tent stakes inserted in holes through the windscreen. Weight = 0g (already in my shelter weight).

    I use a Fosters beer can as my pot. Weight = 32g with lid. The lid came from a small can of mandarin oranges, I believe. A near-perfect fit to the top of the Fosters can (just a bit tight). The lid "handle" is a sawed-off golf peg secured with a tiny screw.

    Using around 20 mL of denatured alcohol, 355 mL of water boils in a little over 4 minutes, with a couple minutes of additional burn time. This is the amount of water I need for an average single-serving dinner.

    The stove, windscreen (rolled up) and fuel bottle will all fit inside the pot. The fuel + bottle should be about 170g (enough fuel for 5 meals plus reserve). So my complete 5-night cooking kit should be around 236g (8.3 oz.).

    Finished product in foreground; unimpressed spectator in background:



    The blue paper under the tools is the template for the windscreen.

    System assembled, ready to boil:



    Packed up:



    A very lightweight 237 mL (8 oz.) drinking water bottle, used for the fuel, fits perfectly inside the rolled up screen, on top of the stove.

    BTW I used one of these smooth-edge can openers to pop the lids off the Fosters and orange cans. It's not the normal metal-cutting type of opener. The Red Bull can was cut to size with a utility blade according to the Zen Stoves web page.
    Last edited by random walk; 04-08-2013 at 08:37 PM.
    "Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left."
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  10. #35
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    MSR Whisperlite International. Heavy but dependable as sunshine in the Sahara.

    CC

  11. #36
    Trail Rider
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    I've been using a Bluett/Esbit stove, but just recently picked up a Jetboil.

  12. #37
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    I love my Snowpeak Giga. Packs up so small, it's crazy.

  13. #38
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    Bikepacking newbie here:

    Anybody using inexpensive stoves like the ones below? It doesn't seem like it. Are there glaring drawbacks to these stoves for the person hoping to get out bikepacking just a few times a year?
    They seem super simple and a windscreen can be fashioned for them. What I'm missing is what does a $70 stove provide that's so much better than a cheap stove?

    Amazon.com: Lightweight Large Burner Classic Camping and Backpacking Stove. For Butane and Propane Canisters: Sports & Outdoors

    Amazon.com: Ultralight Backpacking Canister Camp Stove with Piezo Ignition 3.9oz!: Sports & Outdoors
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  14. #39
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    Littlebug-

    Stoves gone wild-paisano-fire-copy-2.jpg Name:  senior_disassembled.jpg
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  15. #40
    ballbuster
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    I just made a soda can stove. It was a but artsy-craftsy to make, but once I got what they were getting at, it went together pretty well.

    It lit right up and burned pretty evenly. I think I got my jets a bit too big. I might try another one and make things a bit tighter.

    I'm a noob too, so I'm just piecing things together.... Figuring out what works.

  16. #41
    EDR
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    Re: Stoves gone wild

    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot View Post
    I just made a soda can stove. It was a but artsy-craftsy to make, but once I got what they were getting at, it went together pretty well.

    It lit right up and burned pretty evenly. I think I got my jets a bit too big. I might try another one and make things a bit tighter.

    I'm a noob too, so I'm just piecing things together.... Figuring out what works.
    Ya..I made a cat food can stove. It needs refinement but in the end its more of s fun project than anything. I mean the stoves I listed above are less than 8 bucks. Sure, with a fuel can they are heavier than a homemade alcohol stove but no heavier than the 70 or $120 brand name canister type stoves. That's really what I'm looking for comparisons on.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride View Post
    Bikepacking newbie here:

    Anybody using inexpensive stoves like the ones below?[/url]
    i use the 2nd one on a near daily basis for making coffee at home. It's a cheap knock-off of a pocket rocket, so I wouldn't take it on a serious expedition, but it's never given me any problems. And it costs about as much as a can of butane.
    Don't buy all the lies that they feed ya.

  18. #43
    I'm your density
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    Somewhere there's a break-even point for weight when you're comparing an alcohol-based system to a canister system. For me with the Red Bull stove I posted above, I think it's around 8 days (1 boil per day at dinner). YMMV, of course.

    Recently I put together a kit using the aluminum cup from a 6-hour tea light candle for the burner and a 12-oz. keg-style Heineken can for the pot. The candle cup barely registers on my 1-gram scale. I got the 6-hour candles at World Market. Most places sell the 4-hour candles which hold less than 0.5 oz. of fuel.

    The stove is merely an open-flame burner cup (no jets, chimney, etc.) The system uses a conical windscreen plus tent pegs for pot support. This will boil 8 oz. of water in 6 minutes or less and the whole kit is 5 oz. in weight, incl 8 boils of fuel. I use Mary Jane Farms backpacking meals that only take 8 oz. of water to rehydrate, so I can get away with a smaller pot.

    But, with the small pot base and the tendency of the flame to wander in any kind of breeze (even with the wind screen in place), it's possible for the fuel to run out before the water boils; and the tea light cup barely holds 0.5 oz. Not very efficient. I don't think this would be my choice for an extended trip.

    That's about as far down the weight-weenie stove path as I care to venture
    "Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left."
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  19. #44
    I'm your density
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    Also, some areas prohibit open-flame cooking and, depending on who you ask, alcohol stoves fall into that category.
    "Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left."
    — Ty Webb

  20. #45
    ballbuster
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride View Post
    Ya..I made a cat food can stove. It needs refinement but in the end its more of s fun project than anything. I mean the stoves I listed above are less than 8 bucks. Sure, with a fuel can they are heavier than a homemade alcohol stove but no heavier than the 70 or $120 brand name canister type stoves. That's really what I'm looking for comparisons on.
    I'm not looking for serious expeditions at this stage. I'm looking to do single overnighters. I know I have tons of room to pack stuff, and I'm not going so far that the added weight really bothers me.

    Still, a full bottle of Heet and this little puck can stove still weighs less than my tabletop stove with a screw-in fuel canister base, and takes up way less room in my pannier.

    I still need a pot stand and a wind shield to go with it.

    Next step after scoring those items it to try and cook someting with it in my driveway... while the neighbors look at me funny.

    Heh... and while browsing around, I saw this at REI:

    BioLite Wood Burning CampStove - Free Shipping at REI.com

    Stoves gone wild-b1de18cf-ddbd-4394-aae2-d5c9c5402fde.jpg

    I though it was pretty cool that somebody finally though of putting a Peltier Junction in something that burns fuel to charge up your electronics. I wonder how much fuel it takes to recharge an iPhone? At 1A, it takes an iPhone like two hours to fully charge from dead. I can't imagine feeding this goofy thing fuel for two hours, but it is at least an option in the woods... especially considering that solar panels are either big heavy when big enough to be effective, or small light and generally weaksauce... and that's if you have direct sun shining on it.

  21. #46
    I'm your density
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot View Post
    Next step after scoring those items it to try and cook someting with it in my driveway... while the neighbors look at me funny.
    It may actually be better to do this out in the open and let your neighbors see you, rather than let their imaginations run wild on what you're "cooking" based on fumes alone.
    "Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left."
    — Ty Webb

  22. #47
    ballbuster
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    Another question:

    So, what's the deal with these solid fuel stoves? Seems like that little puck would be an easy, simple solution. It seems the fuel pucks are cheap enough... like 50 cents each. Solid fuel seems to be an easy no-mess way to transport stuff.

    What's the downside? Weight? Also, I would think that you're pretty much committed to one whole block of heat. It looks like it can't be adjusted to your needs... in other words, if you just want a little for a small cup of warm tea, or a lot to heat up a quart pot of canned chilli, you can't adjust it to your needs.

    Quote Originally Posted by random walk View Post
    It may actually be better to do this out in the open and let your neighbors see you, rather than let their imaginations run wild on what you're "cooking" based on fumes alone.
    heh... good point. More like, my 'cooking' might be a trigger for my neighbor. He seems like a tweaker. I don't know him very well. I've only lived in this house for 4 months and he keeps to himself.

  23. #48
    I'm your density
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot View Post
    Another question:

    So, what's the deal with these solid fuel stoves? Seems like that little puck would be an easy, simple solution. It seems the fuel pucks are cheap enough... like 50 cents each. Solid fuel seems to be an easy no-mess way to transport stuff.

    What's the downside? Weight? Also, I would think that you're pretty much committed to one whole block of heat. It looks like it can't be adjusted to your needs... in other words, if you just want a little for a small cup of warm tea, or a lot to heat up a quart pot of canned chilli, you can't adjust it to your needs.
    Never used them myself, but from what I've read, there aren't too many downsides. Chiefly, one of the complaints about the Esbit tablets is the residue left after burning; but many people also say it's easily scrubbed off your cook pot. Others don't like the smell of the fumes. I suppose if you're cooking under your shelter in bad weather this can be an issue.

    But I understand you can blow them out when you're done cooking, so there's no waste.
    "Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left."
    — Ty Webb

  24. #49
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    Ok....all interesting info but I'm not so much about weight weenie issues with the stove. I'll be doing single overnighters, not 300 mile races. I still present this question to anybody who'd like to chime in....what is the downside to a cheap $8 stove (like I listed above) compared to the expensive stoves of the same type? If I'm lucky to get out a few times a year for overnighters with my son is there some compelling reason to spend $70 or more on a stove? I'm guessing not.

  25. #50
    EDR
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    Re: Stoves gone wild

    Quote Originally Posted by phirebug View Post
    i use the 2nd one on a near daily basis for making coffee at home. It's a cheap knock-off of a pocket rocket, so I wouldn't take it on a serious expedition, but it's never given me any problems. And it costs about as much as a can of butane.
    Thanks, I missed your post until just now.

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