Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 101 to 125 of 135

Thread: Shelters

  1. #101
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Näräventyr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    8

    Sorry

    Sorry I mean 17 to 18 January. Here is the weather forecast:
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    My bad english because google translate, read more about me and my adventures on the Web: http://naraventyr.blogspot.se/

  2. #102
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    78
    Just picked this up at a local gander mountain that was remodeling and getting rid of all there stock....nothing fancy but for $60 I can't complain. Stats say it weights in at 3lbs 5oz which i can deal with as i'm looking to take my first weekend bikepacking trip come spring....now to make some frame bags before then!



    (not my pics)

  3. #103
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    10
    Anybody who takes a contrail or similar one-pole design, do you just use a tent pole or where do you keep your trekking pole when riding?

  4. #104
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    10
    Curious if there are any trekking poles that would fit on the chainstays when collapsed.

  5. #105
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    112
    I have the Contrail and got the 2 oz (collapsible) tent pole that is sold separately. I strap the collapsible tent pole to my top tube. I have a Revelate gas tank and I slide the pole along the top tube and under the velcro that secures the gast tank to the top tube. I then slide a short length of orange cord thru the end of the pole (when you collapse the pole, there is a short length of stretchy cord exposed between sections and I slide the orange cord thru that) and then tie the orange cord around the stem. This way the gas tank velcro secures the pole to the bike along the tob tube and the orange cord keeps the pole from sliding out. I have never had any problem with the pole getting in the way or with losing it.

  6. #106
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,114
    Quote Originally Posted by FTC Rider View Post
    I have the Contrail and got the 2 oz (collapsible) tent pole that is sold separately. I strap the collapsible tent pole to my top tube. I have a Revelate gas tank and I slide the pole along the top tube and under the velcro that secures the gast tank to the top tube. I then slide a short length of orange cord thru the end of the pole (when you collapse the pole, there is a short length of stretchy cord exposed between sections and I slide the orange cord thru that) and then tie the orange cord around the stem. This way the gas tank velcro secures the pole to the bike along the tob tube and the orange cord keeps the pole from sliding out. I have never had any problem with the pole getting in the way or with losing it.
    i do similar, but I just tuck the end into the revelate gas tank velcro, and put a strap around the other end.

    i made my own pole though, built it up out of slightly larger diameter tubing. only slightly more weight, but better in the wind, or when cinching down in the weather.

  7. #107
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    8
    A dry bag such as a Sea to Summit one should solve the problem if the sleeping bag is packed in the bag.

  8. #108
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    343
    Does anyone have any experience with the Black Diamond Vista tent? Looking at the specifications, it doesn't "seem" that bad? Was looking at the BD Fitzroy tent, but it's 1 lbs heavier than the Vista tent.

    DB Vista Specifications:

    Series : Doublelight Series
    Season : 3
    Capacity : 3
    Doors : 2
    Average Packed Weight : 2.94 kg, 6 lb 8 oz
    Minimum Weight : 2.70 kg, 5 lb 15 oz
    Dimensions : 244 x 218 x 168 x 117 cm, 96 x 86 x 66 x 46 in
    Area : 4.7 m², 50.7 sq ft
    Vestibule Area : 0.8 + 0.8 m², 9 + 9 sq ft
    Packed Size : 20 x 48 cm, 8 x 19 in

  9. #109
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5,749

    Update on TT Moment strut mod...

    I just modified my Moment struts in order to make them easier to install. I mentioned the plan last fall (post #76 of this thread if you want the backstory), but just now got around to trying it. I haven`t field tested this yet, and probably won`t get to that until late April, but it works just fine in my living room ( ) and I don`t expect any complications elsewhere.

    First off, the struts do seem to be arrow shafting. I brought one down to an archery shop and bought four plastic nochs to fit it for a little under a buck per. They just push into the end of the shaft, no glue needed (see first pic).

    I cut the forked end off each noch and turned the outside down to slightly smaller than the OD of the shafts, then rounded them all into a nice bullet shape (second pic). Since the nochs add about 7/16 to the length of each strut, I had to chop a half inch from one end with a cut off wheel in a Dremel. The result is that they are much easier to push in. I had been a little bit concerned that when removing them the bullets might pull out and I`d have a hell of a time working them all the way back out of the long pocket, but that didn`t turn out to be an issue. They fit tightly, and the webbing doesn`t really try all that hard to hang on to them.

    I turned the nochs on a lathe (w/ 6mm collet), since I happen to have one available. With a little more time and patience invested, I`m sure you could pull it off with a file or a sharp knife. Or if you REALLY aren`t in a hurry, or dread slicing your finger while trying to whittle the tiny boogers down with a razor blade, I`m willing to turn them down for anybody who wants a set in exchange for just the cost of parts and the postage, which would probably total about $6.
    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Recalculating....

  10. #110
    Old Punk
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    525
    My newest, and now my favorite, shelter. Hennessy explorer deluxe.
    Shelters-image.jpg
    '09 Specialized Rockhopper expert 29
    Born 26" trials
    '07 Specialized Allez

  11. #111
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    5
    There is the a free standing tent for sale in the classifieds. Sub 2lbs. By Mandatory Gear. Paid add.
    Last edited by Bluegrassbiker; 05-09-2013 at 04:53 AM.

  12. #112
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mjr5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4
    My favorite setup is the Grand Trunk Nano-7 Hammock with a small tarp comes in under 1 1/2lbs with hanging hardware. i made a bug net (Shark cage) for bug season.


  13. #113
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,070

    Shelters

    Quote Originally Posted by mjr5 View Post
    My favorite setup is the Grand Trunk Nano-7 Hammock with a small tarp comes in under 1 1/2lbs with hanging hardware. i made a bug net (Shark cage) for bug season.

    Do you have a design for this bugnet? I'm recently getting into the hammock camping and am financially confined to DIY. I did buy a bias camper hammock. Also got a camo poly tarp I use. Wish I could afford lightweight but I have an ss29er build I'm right in the middle of. Ill be making an INsultext underquilt I found instructions for at backyard daydreamer. Unfortunately they're out of noseeum mesh but I'm sure there are other vendors. Would like to get a bugnet going.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    There's something about those long grueling climbs that gets my front end all stiff... And I'm not talking about lockout...

  14. #114
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    343
    Shelter Review: Black Diamond Mesa Tent + Ground Cloth

    Technical Specs:
    Quote Originally Posted by From the Black Diamond Website
    Tent: Black Diamond Mesa Tent
    Series : Doublelight Series
    Season : 3
    Capacity : 2
    Doors : 2
    Average Packed Weight : 2.32 kg, 5 lb 2 oz
    Minimum Weight : 2.08 kg, 4 lb 9 oz
    Dimensions : 234 x 147 x 112 x 112 cm, 92 x 58 x 44 x 44 in
    Area : 3.0 m², 32.5 sq ft
    Vestibule Area : 0.8 + 0.8 m², 9 + 9 sq ft
    Packed Size : 20 x 48 cm, 8 x 19 in
    Cost: $329.95

    Ground Cloth: Black Diamond Mesa Tent Ground Cloth
    Average Ground Cloth Weight : 275 g, 10 oz
    Cost: $44.95
    The first thing I noticed about the tent, was that it packed up fairly small. The packed size, length-wise, is about the same length as my handle-bars.. so if I attached it to them, it wouldn't be a problem. The next thing is the speed of the set up. It is insanely easy. Steps to set up:

    - Put down the ground cloth (the sides have "color-coded" straps, 2x orange, 2x black). Set down the tent, with the sides matching, orange to orange, black to black. All of the straps have a cone shaped gromet hole in the middle, and a plastic quick-release buckle. Once the tent is down, then comes out the poles. These are all attached by a vinyl / nylon stretch cord, and in the middle is a star-shaped center peice, this has a bolt-looking thing that goes towards the tent.

    - Once the poles are layed down, the ends go through the gromets, and once bowed out, they self-lock. The center of the tent has a U bolt thing that attaches to the center peice of the poles. Each side of the tent has 2 clamps that snap onto the poles. This gives the tent its form.

    - Then the tarp goes over the tent (not necessary, but protects against wind / rain). The corners of the tarp has quick releases that attach to the ground cloth. The corners and sides of the tarp are then staked down

    So, the pro's:

    - Fairly light.. its not the lightest tent, but it isn't heavy by any means
    - Packs small.. again, its not exactly a hammock, but there are plenty of ways to mount to the bike
    - Protects against the elements
    - Easy to set up, especially after a long day's ride
    - Multiple set-ups (ground cloth + tarp, tarp only, ground cloth + tent, ground cloth, tent, tarp, ground cloth only)
    - It's designed for 3-season, mountain terrain.. so it can hold up in high winds (or should, at least.. I can't test this)
    - Plenty of room to store your gear if your solo

    And the con's:
    - A bit pricey
    - The tent needs to have the ground cloth, the bottom has 0 protection against the terrain
    - The tarp vestibules could be a bit bigger / longer imo.
    - The tarp is bright-ass orange. Not condusive to stealth-camping.

  15. #115
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    21
    don't know if this has been mentioned previously in the thread, but i've gotta put the big agnes fly creek ul 2 out there as an awesome, two wall, free standing tent. it weighs less than three pounds with foot print and can be set up as a tarp shelter with said footprint if you want to go super minimal. i used it on a bike camping trip last week and it was perfect. i was able to strap the tent, sleeping bag, and sleeping pad to my handlebars with a revelate designs harness and a sea to summit dry compression sack, perfect set up, espeically with drop bars.

  16. #116
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PhatRoller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    67

    Shelters

    Quote Originally Posted by htdoerge View Post
    don't know if this has been mentioned previously in the thread, but i've gotta put the big agnes fly creek ul 2 out there as an awesome, two wall, free standing tent. it weighs less than three pounds with foot print and can be set up as a tarp shelter with said footprint if you want to go super minimal. i used it on a bike camping trip last week and it was perfect. i was able to strap the tent, sleeping bag, and sleeping pad to my handlebars with a revelate designs harness and a sea to summit dry compression sack, perfect set up, espeically with drop bars.
    Yes sir, agreed. Great tent for bikepacking.

  17. #117
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    444
    So, I have been using a tarp mainly when bikepacking. Nothing fancy, just a utility tarp from a home improvement store. I like it because I can set it up in so many different ways and I appreciate the simplicity.

    But, the thing is still pretty bulky and on the heavy side and so I have been looking at other tarp material options. I find the special camping tarps like those made of silnylon are out of my price range and so have been contemplating cheaper choices.

    Does anyone here have experience with using Tyvek as a camping tarp? I know its a common groundcloth and plenty of folks on ebay or in other camping forums have talked about its use as a sleeping tarp or even DIY bivy, but I have not really heard much first hand experience with it out in the field.

    I have my eye on a 10'X10' with grommet attachments but before I pull the trigger was hoping to hear some feedback. I know its very noisy but that if you run it through the gentle cycle and drip dry, it becomes softer and more tolerable.

    What else? How small does it really pack and how much lighter is it than a utility tarp? Is it really waterproof in a rainstorm? Does it last? Any feedback is appreciated!

  18. #118
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,248


    My main solo bikepacking shelter is a Big Agnes Fly Creek UL1.

    https://www.bigagnes.com/Products/De...nt/FlyCreekUL1

    Actual weight with pegs is 2.3lbs.



    I've got a Hennessy Hammock Backpacker Asym Ultralite.

    Catalogue: Hennessy Hammocks and more

    Actual weight 2.3lbs with pegs & snakeskins/tree savers
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  19. #119
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,088
    re: tyvek, i heard that once you wash it, it may leak.

  20. #120
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Aushiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    177
    One for the Hillberg users ... you might want to pack a spare tooth brush or three and change that morning camp routine ...

    Daily zip cleaning is now required

    Andrew

  21. #121
    Flow like water
    Reputation: DavyRay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    711
    Quote Originally Posted by wahday View Post
    So, I have been using a tarp mainly when bikepacking. Nothing fancy, just a utility tarp from a home improvement store. I like it because I can set it up in so many different ways and I appreciate the simplicity.

    But, the thing is still pretty bulky and on the heavy side and so I have been looking at other tarp material options. I find the special camping tarps like those made of silnylon are out of my price range and so have been contemplating cheaper choices.

    Does anyone here have experience with using Tyvek as a camping tarp? I know its a common groundcloth and plenty of folks on ebay or in other camping forums have talked about its use as a sleeping tarp or even DIY bivy, but I have not really heard much first hand experience with it out in the field.

    I have my eye on a 10'X10' with grommet attachments but before I pull the trigger was hoping to hear some feedback. I know its very noisy but that if you run it through the gentle cycle and drip dry, it becomes softer and more tolerable.

    What else? How small does it really pack and how much lighter is it than a utility tarp? Is it really waterproof in a rainstorm? Does it last? Any feedback is appreciated!
    Tyvek is neat stuff. But...

    It isn't all that cheap. It is heavy. It is noisy. It does not last long. It makes a lousy ground sheet.

    If you really want to try it, go ahead. Tie little rocks in the corners to make pull-outs. Write on it with sharpie markers to dress it up. Rub red clay into it to give it some character. I have even painted it with latex paint to make it more colorful and durable.

    Let us know how it works for you.
    "Head injuries are pretty high-consequence" - AndrwSwitch

  22. #122
    I'm your density
    Reputation: random walk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,585

    Re: Tarps

    Check out this thread in backpackinglight.com about using polycro a.k.a. patio door insulation film. Rain-tested in the PNW.

    Gossamer Gear sells polycro ground cloth as either a single 6'x8' sheet or a pair of 3.3'x8' sheets for $9-10. The single sheet may be big enough for a tarp.
    "Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left."
    — Ty Webb

  23. #123
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    444
    After much hemming an hawing, I have decided to try out a Guide Guard tarp instead of the Tyvek. With shipping, I found one for $28 which was comparable to the Tyvek I was looking at through an e-bay vendor (for a 10' X 10' piece = $26 plus shipping). Here is the link to Bargain Outfitters which seems to have the best price on this. I got the 8.5' X 8.5' model. Plenty of tie-out points, including along the ridgeline for a variety of configurations. It gets good reviews from the ultralight backpacking folks for durability, too. Weighs in at 22oz.

    Also planning to pick up some polycryo this weekend for a ground tarp. If I have any extra I may experiment with it for tarp applications. That was all pretty intriguing information though I didn't see a lot of field-tested reviews.

  24. #124
    ST HO
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    45

    Shelter

    Found these gortex bivy's for $30 a piece at an army surplus.
    Worked great on a recent two night bikepacking trip. Compress
    nicely & 2lbs. Camo...can you see them?
    Name:  IMG_0527.JPG
Views: 1751
Size:  51.7 KB

  25. #125
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by jsheldon View Post
    Found these gortex bivy's for $30 a piece at an army surplus.
    Worked great on a recent two night bikepacking trip. Compress
    nicely & 2lbs. Camo...can you see them?
    yup I see them; and these are nice I plan on getting an Army Modular Sleep System that includes the bivy; and then see if I can score another army Poncho; so I can replace the torn one I have, and use it as a tarp/shelter.

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •