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Thread: Shelters

  1. #26
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    My last trip i hauled a Bob Trailer and brought my REI Quarterdome T2. Weighs about 4lbs packed and was very spacious. For my next trip I'm going to use soft bags exclusively so I wanted something lighter and more compact. I was going to go for a Bivy/Tarp combo but have found hammocks way more comfortable. Hammock with suspension weighs ~10oz. / Tarp with rigging weighs another ~10oz.




  2. #27
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    ^ Nice setup. I like the idea of hammocks.

  3. #28
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    what is a gt nano-7 with 7/64 amsteel whoopies? and how about 1.75mm dyneema asrl?

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    what is a gt nano-7 with 7/64 amsteel whoopies? and how about 1.75mm dyneema asrl?
    gt nano-7 is a "Grand Trunk Nano-7" hammock. I'm probably going to upsize to a larger hammock though. The dimensions are a little small even for me at 5'8". I'm going to sew my own but there are other options like the "weight weenie" from Butt in a Sling Hammock Gear - Gear.

    7/64 amsteel whoopies refer to the adjustable lines that connect the hammock to the tree straps (Samson-The Strongest Name in Rope, AMSTEEL-BLUE) It's super light, 7/64" in diameter and has a breaking strength of like 1,400 lbs. Google Whoopie slings to see how they work.

    ASRL = adjustable structural ridgeline. It's the thin line above the hammock that adjusts the sag so you can change the way the hammock feels.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesergeant View Post
    gt nano-7 is a "Grand Trunk Nano-7" hammock. I'm probably going to upsize to a larger hammock though. The dimensions are a little small even for me at 5'8".
    I made my hammock really long so it would be more comfortable. Best part of making your own stuff!

    Quote Originally Posted by thesergeant View Post
    7/64 amsteel whoopies refer to the adjustable lines that connect the hammock to the tree straps (Samson-The Strongest Name in Rope, AMSTEEL-BLUE) It's super light, 7/64" in diameter and has a breaking strength of like 1,400 lbs. Google Whoopie slings to see how they work.
    Interesting. I just tie knots. But your stuff ought to be very light.

    Quote Originally Posted by thesergeant View Post
    ASRL = adjustable structural ridgeline. It's the thin line above the hammock that adjusts the sag so you can change the way the hammock feels.
    Ah, yeah. I have never tried one of those. I like my hammock pretty flat. The asrl would also make it easier to add bug netting, I reckon, a la hennesey et al.

    Thanks for the answers!

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by baker View Post
    I have a Golite Shangri-La 2 that works pretty well. Spacious for 1 person, acceptable for 2.


    Ring the Peak bikepacking trip by bbaker22, on Flickr
    what did you use for poles? did it come with some or is it meant for treking pols??

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by neil.beltchenko View Post
    what did you use for poles? did it come with some or is it meant for treking pols??
    Easiest set up is with poles (trekking poles or tent poles). It is also designed so that once you stake out the corners you can suspend the shelter by tying off to a tree branch or something overhead. I've seen people use sticks for similar shelters.

    I built a set of tent poles for mine. I added a rubber cover for the end that meets the tent and a large washer that fits over the bottom to prevent it from slowly sinking into the ground.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loudpawlz View Post
    Easiest set up is with poles (trekking poles or tent poles). It is also designed so that once you stake out the corners you can suspend the shelter by tying off to a tree branch or something overhead. I've seen people use sticks for similar shelters.

    I built a set of tent poles for mine. I added a rubber cover for the end that meets the tent and a large washer that fits over the bottom to prevent it from slowly sinking into the ground.
    I suppose i could do the same with the Beta Light by Blackdiamond? its lighter and cheaper? would you know what the sl2 has that the beta does not??

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by neil.beltchenko View Post
    what did you use for poles? did it come with some or is it meant for treking pols??
    I bought poles from somewhere (wish I could remember where) that specializes in lightweight tarptent poles. The tent can be pitched by stringing it up to a tree, but I'm too lazy for that and in Colorado we aren't guaranteed to have suitable trees near treeline.

    Oh yeah, trekking poles would work great, but I don't carry those when I ride (or hike).
    baker

  10. #35
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    Gonna do my first bikepack this summer. Road/trail around southeast Ohio for a week. I'm not sure yet but my two choices are my surplus gore-tex bivy and a tarp, or my Sierra Designs clip flashlight2. The tent packs at about 4.5lbs, but the bugs in Ohio are relentless so I'm thinking tent.
    '09 Specialized Rockhopper expert 29
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  11. #36
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    You will want something with good air circulation. the tarp with a bug net hung inside it might work well, or the tent. It seems to me that the bivy would be way too hot. But you know your equipment and conditions better than I do.

  12. #37
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    I use a Wenzel Starlite tent. Lightweight for what it is. I have tested it in a week long wind and rain storm in my backyard and it held up like a champ. I expected to have to add waterproofing but I dont see a reason to at this point. It straps to the hoods on my woodchipper bars like it was made for them.

  13. #38
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    I've got a Slumberjack Summer Bivy Shelter, 38"x90"x24", carry weight: 2lbs 8 oz, SJK7157. I used it when I rode to Florida. It handled down poors pretty good and I wouldn't hesitate to use it in the Winter. It has a screen top to keep the bugs out and a tarp for when it rains.

    I always like seeing pictures but I can't figure out how to post the pictures from my computer.
    Last edited by INABIL; 04-17-2012 at 08:46 PM.
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  14. #39
    drunken pirate
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    I use a 5'x8' piece of Tyvek I've outfitted with 6 grommets. Light and cheap!
    More Trails, Not Less

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  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by curtboroff View Post
    Gonna do my first bikepack this summer. Road/trail around southeast Ohio for a week. I'm not sure yet but my two choices are my surplus gore-tex bivy and a tarp, or my Sierra Designs clip flashlight2. The tent packs at about 4.5lbs, but the bugs in Ohio are relentless so I'm thinking tent.
    @Billinhouston. You're right about the bivy sacks, no circulation. I usually use it as a ground cloth if the weather let's me.

    Also, I just weighed my tent/fly/poles/stakes/groundcloth and it weighed 3.2lbs. Over a pound lighter than I guessed, and weighs the same as the tarp/bivy sack.
    Tent FTW.
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    Born 26" trials
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  16. #41
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    Warbonnet Blackbird DL 1.1, Warbonnet Superfly tarp, HammockGear phoenix under quilt, HammockGear burrow top quilt. I sleep like a rock
    Clipless sucks...

  17. #42
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    thesergeant that hammock thing is sweet

  18. #43
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    I use a Black Diamond Tripod Bivy. Super warm, perfect for Autumn/Winter/early Spring.. not so good in Summer.
    www.bottlesandchains.com
    'ride local, drink global'

  19. #44
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    bds, I'm thinking you mean Bipod. The Tripod has a pole at the foot. Maybe a tad overkill for summer weather, but the respite from skeets is worth a few ounces extra IMO. My Bipod shined on two trips, and is in the queue for another outing this summer.

    People are grooving hard on hammocks. To each his own. I just can't imagine trying to find two perfectly-spaced trees every time I need a few winks. To me part of the beauty self contained multi-day riding is the quick stealth bivy, or running out the light (or energy) and bivying right TF where you end up. Someone saw a pic of one of my bivies and commented "grim!" Haha...

    Mike

  20. #45
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    Sleeping Pad Suggestions

    Hi,
    Are there any Recommandations on small and light sleeping pads ?

  21. #46
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    The Pacific Outdoor Equipment Peak Elite AC Sleeping Pad simply cannot be beat for the price, weight and volume. Full length, 2.5", 10 oz, rolls up super small.

    POE Peak Elite AC Sleeping Pad Review - YouTube

  22. #47
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    seems good but have read some bad reviews... any issues with it as i´m gonna take it along the great divide and wouldn´t want any reliabilty issues.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by liricooli View Post
    seems good but have read some bad reviews... any issues with it as i´m gonna take it along the great divide and wouldn´t want any reliabilty issues.
    I wouldn't worry about it. Probably a batch issue, if that. I slept on mine for more than 2 weeks straight on my last trip with out a single problem. When I first got it, I inflated it fully, put it in the corner of the room, filled up a couple backpacks full of random stuff and laid it across the mattress. Checked it every now and then to make sure there weren't any slow leaks. Couple days later -- no pressure loss -- so I knew I was good to go. My fiance thought I was nuts but I'd rather found out about a slow leak at home where I can find it and patch it that a few days into a trip.

  24. #49
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    Great Idea! would do just the same..

  25. #50
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    Im going to put more grommets in this thing so that I can cover my hammock from 'biner to 'biner, but this is essentially what I have

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