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Thread: Shelters

  1. #51
    gran jefe
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    kdirk, have you ever tried putting that tarp diagonally over the hammock? It might be the right size/shape to go that way. it would be asymmetrical, but i think it has potential.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    kdirk, have you ever tried putting that tarp diagonally over the hammock? It might be the right size/shape to go that way. it would be asymmetrical, but i think it has potential.
    I have thought of that however the only reason I had that tarp up (usually unless it rains im lazy and have the top open) was cause there was nice wind coming in from the west (side with all the trees) keeping my butt cold. This wind breaker/slight insulator helped a bit with the coldness.

  3. #53
    gran jefe
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    gotcha.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdirk View Post
    Im going to put more grommets in this thing so that I can cover my hammock from 'biner to 'biner, but this is essentially what I have
    I'd try an 8x10 from home depot/lowes/wal-mart. they cost less than $10 and typically come in medium and heavy weight options. Huge grommets pre-installed, and its a great size if you actually have to get away from the rain (whereas a much smaller one would be acceptable if the likelihood of rain were very low).

    I can fit all of my gear and my bike beneath me and I can sit down too, all staying dry. If a storm comes with heavy winds, bringing the sides closer to the ground does a great job of keeping out most moisture.

    I also recommend tying the tarp to the same trees as the hammock. You could tie the tarp to the hammock itself, allowing you to simultaneously hang both, but there's a greater risk of tangles.

    just some thoughts...

  5. #55
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    I could see me camping in a bivvy...but for the most part it's me an dmy 10 year old son,so we packs a cheap (inexpensive too ) tent from Kmart...


    It's ok though,we don't get in a big hurry,my granny's lo enough to climb with extra weight,and got's plenty of packing room on this...



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  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by PretendGentleman View Post
    I'd try an 8x10 from home depot/lowes/wal-mart. they cost less than $10 and typically come in medium and heavy weight options. Huge grommets pre-installed, and its a great size if you actually have to get away from the rain (whereas a much smaller one would be acceptable if the likelihood of rain were very low).

    I can fit all of my gear and my bike beneath me and I can sit down too, all staying dry. If a storm comes with heavy winds, bringing the sides closer to the ground does a great job of keeping out most moisture.

    I also recommend tying the tarp to the same trees as the hammock. You could tie the tarp to the hammock itself, allowing you to simultaneously hang both, but there's a greater risk of tangles.

    just some thoughts...


    Ive had a tyvek tarp, think its 9' x 10', for a while, just need to put grommets/ or straps on it. One of these days ill get off my laxy butt and do it

  7. #57
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    This setup worked great for e last weekend. Simple, light and cheap. Saw the design posted in another forum here.


  8. #58
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    While I've yet to bikepack (it's defitely going to happen once I get my bike), i have a bunch of options I use now...

    REI Quaterdome T1: Lightweight solo shelter, generally use for fair weather backpacking.
    Mountain Hardwear Sprite 1: Heavier, but pretty much bombproof.
    Nemo Morpho 1: Again a bit heavy, but very roomy for a 1 person tent. Shrugs off wind. Easiest setup ever.
    REI Half Dome 2: Backpacking or car camping with my 12 year old daughter.
    Exped Orion 2: Hardcore winter tent. This is what I take out in the snow.
    I've had many different hammocks... Clark NX-200, NX-150, Hennessy Expedition with extensive zipper modding, Warbonnet Blackbird and a homemade gathered-end hammock. Currently using the NX-150. Heavy as heck, but comfy. The Blackbird was super light an nicely made, but I never could get comfy with the footbox. I carry a Speer Winter tarp for hammock camping. Not the smallest/lightest, but seriously versatile set-up options.

    Last but not least, I have a milsurp bivvy that I never use. I would like to eventually get a decent bivvy, like a Marmot Alpinist or similar. The Big Agnes 3-wire e-Vent looks sweet.

  9. #59
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    My shelter of choice at the moment is a Tarptent Scarp 1.



    In "flight mode" at Walkers Creek, Litchfield National Park, Northern Territory, Australia. It was around 20 C / 68 F at night and I had expected much cooler nights (what is normal at this time of the year) so I had the solid interior. The "flight mode" was an attempt to catch what breeze was offer. All I seem to get but was mozzies.

    Andrew

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by random walk View Post
    - The Yama 1.25 Bug Shelter (used to be Alpinlite).
    Finally got around to taking a pic of this. I also got the fitted tarp. About 28 oz. (793 g) including shelter, tarp, Tyvek ground cover, Ti stakes and guy lines.


  11. #61
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    Just got a hand me down Neptune crestone 1. Weighs 4 pounds and took 4minutes to pitch. All mesh bivy with rainfly and porch. I love it. Can't wait to put it to use!
    There's something about those long grueling climbs that gets my front end all stiff... And I'm not talking about lockout...

  12. #62
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    recent pic of my contrail setup.


    contrail, fargo by mbeganyi, on Flickr

    24 oz + pole, published. haven't checked it, but its light and packs small.

  13. #63
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    bmike: I fell in love with the Contrail after seeing the setup process. It's an awesome design from what I can assume. I'm interested in how the stitching holds up. How small does it pack down to in a stuff sack?

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by JHCreighton View Post
    bmike: I fell in love with the Contrail after seeing the setup process. It's an awesome design from what I can assume. I'm interested in how the stitching holds up. How small does it pack down to in a stuff sack?
    holding up well, but i've only had it out on weekend trips.

    shot from this weekend - very windy in an exposed meadow site, and rain, most of the night. wind changed 180 just as i was getting ready to climb in and the fire was dying down. i should have re-pitched foot into the wind - but it held up well, even with the gusts. the back is dropped down into a storm pitch, as the wind was originally coming from the rear. the struts slide and fasten with some velcro.


    my tarp tent contrail by mbeganyi, on Flickr

    packs down into the stuff sack they send with it - 4"x14". center pole goes elsewhere. if you remove the little struts in the rear from their sleeves you can get it even smaller - but i don't want to fuss with those in the field. looking at a simpler way to do that, but haven't put the brain power into it yet.

    here is is on my bike - inside of a dry bag. the stakes are in there as well. its really puffy, i didn't do a good job of compressing it down, and just pushed it in there and strapped it on. when it goes into the stuff sack that came with it it goes to the 4x14" lists. that pic is more like 5x15. the poles rode in my front harness (i carry a short little pole for the rear to help create a ridge and shed water. you could also use a stick.


    IMG_8242 by mbeganyi, on Flickr

    more pics here.


    TarpTent Contrail, from inside by mbeganyi, on Flickr


    TarpTent Contrail by mbeganyi, on Flickr

  15. #65
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    I have a Contrail and you do have to seam seal the stitching before you take it out - pretty easy, though. I didn't have a problem w/leaking or with the seams, though I just got it this summer and haven't had it out too many times. It does pack down to the size stated on their website (I think it's tarptent.com) though it took me around 10 minutes to take it down, pull stakes, roll it up and stuff it into the sack. You do have to roll it tight to get it into the stuff sack. My suggestion is to practice it several times, setting up and taking down before you go on the road with it (including getting it wet and then trying it). The pole is a bit awkward to pack but I found a good place for it on my bike - tying it to the side of the downtube (I have a frame type bag that is velcroed to the downtube and the pole slides right underneath the velcro so no extra string is needed for this part), with a string tying the end to the stem so it doesn't slide down.

  16. #66
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    Currently I have a Outdoor Research Bug Bivy and a Spinn Twin Tarp from Gossamer Gear. I've only used this hiking with poles but I don't see why I can't use my bike as a pole like above. If it was cool enough I would leave the bivy at home and just use a head net.
    I'm all about less is more so I'll be looking at a bivy from backpackinglight.com They have some crazy light bivys that one could use for bikepacking.
    Craig Fowler
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  17. #67
    ColoradoCoolBreeze
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    No trees like Utah:
    Mtn Hardware one man tent with neoair pad.


    If I have tree's like Colorado I prefer a hammock.

    "Snipe"


    Both complete sleep systems weighs ~3.5#

    04 Azonic Saber
    08 Yeti AS-x
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  18. #68
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    I need to find a more compact shelter. After a few not-so-successful attempts at setting up a free silny flat tarp, I went back to look at single wall tents. I`ve been nearly ready to write a check for either a TT Contrail or a Moment, but still a little bit on the fence. The front entry of the Contrail doesn`t appeal to me, but I feel pretty well assured by BMike and others that I actually could live with it. While the Moment`s packed length is a huge bummer, the rest of its design is just plain sweet! Fortunately, I live only about two hours drive from TT`s "corporate HQ", so I finally set up an appointment to go check them both out in person and get Mr Shires`s views on de-strutting as well as see how the Mile Long Moment actually fits when strapped on my bike. I`m going Monday- hope to come home a couple hundred Dollars lighter in the wallet.

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    I need to find a more compact shelter. After a few not-so-successful attempts at setting up a free silny flat tarp, I went back to look at single wall tents. I`ve been nearly ready to write a check for either a TT Contrail or a Moment, but still a little bit on the fence. The front entry of the Contrail doesn`t appeal to me, but I feel pretty well assured by BMike and others that I actually could live with it. While the Moment`s packed length is a huge bummer, the rest of its design is just plain sweet! Fortunately, I live only about two hours drive from TT`s "corporate HQ", so I finally set up an appointment to go check them both out in person and get Mr Shires`s views on de-strutting as well as see how the Mile Long Moment actually fits when strapped on my bike. I`m going Monday- hope to come home a couple hundred Dollars lighter in the wallet.
    A buddy of mine just got the moment. Said it takes 2 seconds per strut to pull them out or put them in. 4 struts total. It's a pretty sweet tent.

    So is the contrail.

    Have a good visit.

  20. #70
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    ^^Thanks for that!
    If that buddy is the guy with the BMX pedals on a Pacer, I think he and I are soul mates

    Just seconds to remove/install? Is it a stock Moment, or did he mod it for that? I read an account somewhere by Moment user who clains it was a major PITA and I think he even ended up having to wet the fabric to get it to stretch a little bit. Another post from some backpacking forum mentioned some fairly complicated mods to make it easy. I was considering maybe chopping an inch or so off each strut, one of the things I mean to ask about next week.

  21. #71
    Unhinged Aussie on a 29er
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    I think bmike has done a good job of convincing people of the Tarptent's merits. One question though - the little stick you use on the back of the tent as an optional extra: would you be able to use a moderately sized mini pump in place of a stick to help create the ridge? e.g. a Topeak Road Morph pump @ 14" in length

  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    ^^Thanks for that!
    If that buddy is the guy with the BMX pedals on a Pacer, I think he and I are soul mates

    Just seconds to remove/install? Is it a stock Moment, or did he mod it for that? I read an account somewhere by Moment user who clains it was a major PITA and I think he even ended up having to wet the fabric to get it to stretch a little bit. Another post from some backpacking forum mentioned some fairly complicated mods to make it easy. I was considering maybe chopping an inch or so off each strut, one of the things I mean to ask about next week.
    not the guy on the pacer with bmx pedals. he has henessy hammock.
    but he has done some rando rides on that rig with hiking shoes.


    well, he just got it and was messing around, kinda telling me that i could have used that tent as well. so i haven't seen it done. from what henry told me when i inquired - he said he would not want to do it every night and then repeat in the morning.

    if they are like my contrail - yes, the do go in and out, but it takes a little longer than 2 seconds a piece.

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter006 View Post
    I think bmike has done a good job of convincing people of the Tarptent's merits. One question though - the little stick you use on the back of the tent as an optional extra: would you be able to use a moderately sized mini pump in place of a stick to help create the ridge? e.g. a Topeak Road Morph pump @ 14" in length
    could be a stick, your bike (if you ran the chord up and over), a wheel, a collapsible tripod for a camera, etc. no reason a pump wouldn't work, so long as it was long enough.

    that little pole is 18" and is in a sleeve with line attached. really could be anything 18" or longer, depending on how you rig it.


    i haven't tried this yet for the front. i'd likely keep it further away from the bike, assuming it wasn't a PITA, as the extra pole is really lite.


  24. #74
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    Older Nemo Gogo has been good for me. Just cram it, my sleeping pad and sleeping bag in the front harness bag. A little heavy, but nice not to deal with poles.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Shelters-p1020260.jpg  

    Shelters-p1020244.jpg  


  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by xhailofgunfirex View Post
    Older Nemo Gogo has been good for me. Just cram it, my sleeping pad and sleeping bag in the front harness bag. A little heavy, but nice not to deal with poles.
    Love the first photo. Really cool.

    Andrew

  26. #76
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    De-struttin Henry`s stuff...

    Tough decision between the Moment and the Contrail, but I finally went for the Moment. The end struts in the Moment are the biggest problem as far as bicycling goes, so that turned out to be the bulk of the conversation that I had with Henry Shires. He says that minor differences between batches seem to cause thet confusion over how easy or dificult they are to install after removal. Apparently, humidity can also affect it- he says the nylon tends to shrink up slightly when its very dry, so wetting the it down will usually help if they`re feeling stubborn. Since I was pretty confused over that whole idea, here`s how the system works.

    The struts just slide into long pockets that look to be formed by sewing along the edge of one inch webbing folded lengthwise. The seam stops about an inch from the bottom end, leaving a small opening to push them in through. On my particular tent, they go in very easily until the last 1.5 inches or so, then I have to wiggle, push, and cuss to get the last part in. As of now, I`m going to say I doubt I`ll remove them every time I pack it up, but I have an idea that will hopefully simplify the process enough to make it worthwhile. The issue isn`t the length, as I had thought previously,but the diameter of the struts. It`s because the top end of each of those long pockets has a piece of velcro sewn on, and the extra stitching for that velcro slightly reduces the width of the pocket.

    The ends of struts are cut flat. I suspect that just capping them with a bullet shaped end and trimming the bottom to the original OAL will help a lot. I`ll report back after I try that. I also considered replacing them with a slightly smaller diameter tube, but at 0.291 inches, the carbon tubing is already smaller than any aluminum tent pole sections I can find. I think it`s probably arrow shafting, and will run one by an archery shop to ask. My bullet ends might be as simple as installing arrow nochs and grinding them to a rounded end with a belt sander.

    As is, the package is pretty long, but it will fit on my bike. I need to ride a while with it tied under the TT to see if it`s going to bug me by brushing my knees on each pedal stroke (guessing that`s a yes). Otherwise, it`ll have to share the rear rack with my sleeping bag. That won`t be a problem with a dry tent, but I don`t think I want to snuggle the two together like that after a wet packup. The two pics on my bike show the tent without the long pole, but with the struts installed. The long pole will go on the underside of my rack no matter where I put the rest of the tent.

    The other tent pic (not on bike) is with struts removed. I can just barely squeeze it into the bag that came with my full length Insulated Air Core matress, leaving it 10 inches long x 5 inches diameter. Note that a packed Contrail is only slightly bigger without any messing around- it just rolls up and stuffs right into the shorter bag. Oh, another note on the Contrail- I did throw my sleeping mat into one and climb in after it. Yup, very easy, and I did NOT have to back in.
    Attached Images Attached Images     

  27. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Tough decision between the Moment and the Contrail, but I finally went for the Moment. The end struts in the Moment are the biggest problem as far as bicycling goes, so that turned out to be the bulk of the conversation that I had with Henry Shires. He says that minor differences between batches seem to cause thet confusion over how easy or dificult they are to install after removal. Apparently, humidity can also affect it- he says the nylon tends to shrink up slightly when its very dry, so wetting the it down will usually help if they`re feeling stubborn. Since I was pretty confused over that whole idea, here`s how the system works.

    The struts just slide into long pockets that look to be formed by sewing along the edge of one inch webbing folded lengthwise. The seam stops about an inch from the bottom end, leaving a small opening to push them in through. On my particular tent, they go in very easily until the last 1.5 inches or so, then I have to wiggle, push, and cuss to get the last part in. As of now, I`m going to say I doubt I`ll remove them every time I pack it up, but I have an idea that will hopefully simplify the process enough to make it worthwhile. The issue isn`t the length, as I had thought previously,but the diameter of the struts. It`s because the top end of each of those long pockets has a piece of velcro sewn on, and the extra stitching for that velcro slightly reduces the width of the pocket.

    The ends of struts are cut flat. I suspect that just capping them with a bullet shaped end and trimming the bottom to the original OAL will help a lot. I`ll report back after I try that. I also considered replacing them with a slightly smaller diameter tube, but at 0.291 inches, the carbon tubing is already smaller than any aluminum tent pole sections I can find. I think it`s probably arrow shafting, and will run one by an archery shop to ask. My bullet ends might be as simple as installing arrow nochs and grinding them to a rounded end with a belt sander.

    As is, the package is pretty long, but it will fit on my bike. I need to ride a while with it tied under the TT to see if it`s going to bug me by brushing my knees on each pedal stroke (guessing that`s a yes). Otherwise, it`ll have to share the rear rack with my sleeping bag. That won`t be a problem with a dry tent, but I don`t think I want to snuggle the two together like that after a wet packup. The two pics on my bike show the tent without the long pole, but with the struts installed. The long pole will go on the underside of my rack no matter where I put the rest of the tent.

    The other tent pic (not on bike) is with struts removed. I can just barely squeeze it into the bag that came with my full length Insulated Air Core matress, leaving it 10 inches long x 5 inches diameter. Note that a packed Contrail is only slightly bigger without any messing around- it just rolls up and stuffs right into the shorter bag. Oh, another note on the Contrail- I did throw my sleeping mat into one and climb in after it. Yup, very easy, and I did NOT have to back in.
    thanks for the report.
    i also though about doing the frame bag thing for the moment, but my fargo simply runs out of room for that with its smaller triangle.

    looks like you made a good choice for you - and you have options for packing. cant wait to see my buddies tent in action. likely very late fall trip coming up.

    i made a stiffer pole for the contrail today. ordered parts from quest outfitters and have a slightly heavier collapsible front pole (still 3 pieces, although I debated going 4 so it packed smaller) - but out of .433 tubing. much stiffer than the nano stuff that came standard.

  28. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    As is, the package is pretty long, but it will fit on my bike. I need to ride a while with it tied under the TT to see if it`s going to bug me by brushing my knees on each pedal stroke (guessing that`s a yes).
    I hadn't considered doing this but will give it a try with my Giant XTC 2 as I have no rear rack and the rack on the Extrawheel Voyager will have the sleeping bag on it.

    Otherwise, it`ll have to share the rear rack with my sleeping bag. That won`t be a problem with a dry tent, but I don`t think I want to snuggle the two together like that after a wet packup.
    A dry bag such as a Sea to Summit one should solve the problem if the sleeping bag is packed in the bag.

    Andrew

  29. #79
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    I have one more weekend off before we dive full swing into our busy season at work. Will take a fall color mini tour and hope for rain
    Well, not too much rain, since I won`t have my new toy seam sealed yet.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmike View Post
    i made a stiffer pole for the contrail today. ordered parts from quest outfitters and have a slightly heavier collapsible front pole (still 3 pieces, although I debated going 4 so it packed smaller) - but out of .433 tubing. much stiffer than the nano stuff that came standard.
    That sounds like a good idea, and I figured I`d do it if I had ended up with a Contrail. If you were to use two different diameter tubes, do you think it would be worth while to store the smaller sections inside the larger ones? It would require a step-down reducer of some kind, though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aushiker View Post
    A dry bag such as a Sea to Summit one should solve the problem if the sleeping bag is packed in the bag.
    Actually, I`ve been using a light weight dry bag (S-S, I think) since this summer, but I dunno if it`ll work with something wet constantly held against it, or if it`s just supposed to keep drizzilng rain out. Do you think it`ll keep the bag dry under that circumstance? Otherwise, I guess I could just use a little piece of plastic to separate them.

    Aushiker, you have a Scarp, don`t you? How have you been carrying it?

  30. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Actually, I`ve been using a light weight dry bag (S-S, I think) since this summer, but I dunno if it`ll work with something wet constantly held against it, or if it`s just supposed to keep drizzilng rain out. Do you think it`ll keep the bag dry under that circumstance? Otherwise, I guess I could just use a little piece of plastic to separate them.
    I have trusted them with my sleeping bag in a pack swim so I guess I think it would do the trick



    Aushiker, you have a Scarp, don`t you? How have you been carrying it?
    Yes a Tarptent Scarp 1. I have carried it on the rear rack on my Surly Long Haul Trucker and when I needed the rack for a 10 litre water bag it joined my sleeping bag on the Upper Rack on my Extrawheel Voyager.





    I was actually getting my Giant XTC 2 ready for a couple of days bikepacking next week and tried securing the tent on top of my top tube (cables run underneath) but couldn't get it tight enough to stop it slipping around so will go back to carrying it on the Upper Rack on the trailer.

    I had thought of carrying the poles separately to see if I can pack it down smaller to go in a pannier. My try this on the weekend.

    Andrew

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    I remember those

    Quote Originally Posted by curtboroff View Post
    Gonna do my first bikepack this summer. Road/trail around southeast Ohio for a week. I'm not sure yet but my two choices are my surplus gore-tex bivy and a tarp, or my Sierra Designs clip flashlight2. The tent packs at about 4.5lbs, but the bugs in Ohio are relentless so I'm thinking tent.
    I spent many nights in the woods in southeastern ohio and in WV.

    The bugs were quite bad. I thought I knew bugs. Then I moved to South Carolina along the Georgia border.

    Now I know bugs. I swear the mosquitoes here are the size of small bats!

    My first overnight hiking trip in my bivvy bag and I awoke to this horrible searing pain on my side. I climbed out of my bivvy bag to find a nice little southern devil scorpion who decided he liked my body heat. They aren't dangerous if you aren't allergic to them, but damn their stings feel like a bad hornet sting.

    I'm using a tent from here on out. Too many dangerous creepy crawlies here. If the black widows, brown recluse, scorpions, or mosquitoes don't get you, then the copperheads or rattlers might.
    It's easy to make a buck, it's much harder to make a difference."

  32. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    That sounds like a good idea, and I figured I`d do it if I had ended up with a Contrail. If you were to use two different diameter tubes, do you think it would be worth while to store the smaller sections inside the larger ones? It would require a step-down reducer of some kind, though.
    I would just make it match the existing. How would you assemble them if the pieces were to fit inside the other? And if they were loose, and not connected by shock chord, you could lose one...

    You could get an old Leki pole with the sliding adjustments maybe, but that would seem to be heavier and more complex.

  33. #83
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    ^^I was thinking loose, but you`re right, probably not a good idea.

  34. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    ^^I was thinking loose, but you`re right, probably not a good idea.
    i don't think the miniscule weight savings advantage would be worth it. my .433 pole is far stiffer than the proportion of weight i've just added to my kit...

  35. #85
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    Not to derail this thread, but rodar y rodar how do you like that impact pro mos? I just had my brother buy me one in nearly new condition off craigslist for $100. Unfortunately it will be about 4 months before I can ride it though cause I'm out of the country until then.

    I use a Eureka Spitfire Solo tent for bike tours.

  36. #86
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    Really? Cool. There aren`t many of them out there- I think they only made them for one or two years. The frame is a bit heavy for a lot of uses, but being beefy is perfect for my purpose (touring and commuting). The only original parts on mine are the brake calipers and the seatpost, though the stock componentry was decent mid-level Shimano mtb stuff. Mostly I like my bike because it formerly belonged to a favorite uncle who passed away several years ago. I feel like I get a chance to honor him every time I roll off to work on it

    By the way, good eyes! Hope you like your bike when you get it. Can`t go too far wrong at that price.

  37. #87
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    We use our tents for both backpacking and bikepacking. Well, almost exclusively backpacking, but we've used it for bikepacking now too.

    Tent of choice is a Mountain Hardware Trango 2. Much larger and heavier than what most of you guys use, but it will keep you warm and dry, guaranteed. And, we have two people to carry it. We can break down our bikes and get them mostly covered by the vestibule, and do our cooking at the other end.

    Overkill 90% of the time, and we have a smaller North Face, which is a 3 season and much lighter. For some reason we don't use it that often. I guess it's better to be safe than sorry up at 11,000-12,000ft.
    Death from Below.
    RLTW!

  38. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Really? Cool. There aren`t many of them out there- I think they only made them for one or two years. The frame is a bit heavy for a lot of uses, but being beefy is perfect for my purpose (touring and commuting). The only original parts on mine are the brake calipers and the seatpost, though the stock componentry was decent mid-level Shimano mtb stuff. Mostly I like my bike because it formerly belonged to a favorite uncle who passed away several years ago. I feel like I get a chance to honor him every time I roll off to work on it

    By the way, good eyes! Hope you like your bike when you get it. Can`t go too far wrong at that price.
    Hah, yeah the weird chainstays tipped me off. Judging from some catalog scans I found,I think mine is entirely stock excepting the saddle which actually looks nicer. The tires are even original and don't look to be warn. Along with the schwinn, I also have an 80s shogun rigid MTB. I'm going to convert one of them into a drop bar 3 speed commuter but I'm not sure which one yet. I guess it's kind of novel to keep the schwinn original but ultimately I favor function over that kind of nostalgia.

  39. #89
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    nice

  40. #90
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    There are some brilliant ideas here.

    Great thread !

    I have wanted to do this for a while.
    Northern Virginia.

  41. #91
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    Saw this on steepandcheap today for $187 (1/2 off)...NEMO Equipment Inc. Moto 1P Superbivy with Footprint: 1-Person 3-Season. Features a unique, inflatable main support and a feathery sub-three-pound weight. I'm not in the market, but the inflatable support sounded interesting. Anybody use one?

    If you're interested, it may rotate back around, or maybe try their alerts.

    A unique, inflatable support design allows the NEMO Equipment Moto 1P Superbivy with Footprint to pack down so small you can fit it inside the panniers on your bike or motorcycle, or under the seat of your canoe. Just unpack this tent, stake it out, attach the collapsible strut to tension the foot, and inflate the main support by the head using the included pump. Without poles and thanks to the single-person design, this one-of-a-kind tent weighs in at just under three pounds. You'll be hard pressed to find a solo tent that's lighter and easier to set up.

    Airbeam main support inflates quickly and provides enough headroom for a camper to sit up at the head of the tent
    Airbeam keeps the tent structurally stable, tensions the tent, and stands up to foul weather and wind
    Inner tent can be retracted underneath the fly to create a temporary, full-length vestibule space for gear storage
    Collapsible strut tensions the foot of the tent and tucks inside a reinforced sleeve at the Swallow Tail
    Two mesh vents promote cross ventilation from the head of the tent to the foot of the tent so you feel cool and comfortable, not stifled
    Included with the tent is a drybag-style stuff sack, integrated Pump, collapsible strut, stakes, and a repair kit


  42. #92
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    Sounds pretty cool. Are there pictures available that can be shared here?
    Northern Virginia.

  43. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renntag View Post
    Sounds pretty cool. Are there pictures available that can be shared here?
    Google...

    "I have one speed. I have one gear: Go." -- Charlie Sheen

  44. #94
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    I used the Big Agnes Lynx Pass 1 this summer for a couple trips in the Allegheny National Forest in PA. It's not too heavy, good features, and has a decent amount of room laying and sitting up. Quick setup as well. Price is right being around $179 msrp, but you can find them on sale for less now.

    It worked great in constant rain. Wish I had a light simple tarp to have set the tent up under while it was raining out. Somebody told me that idea afterwards.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Shelters-img_0391.jpg  


  45. #95
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    One of my tent that I use is a "Hilleberg Rajd" there is a light, but there is no inner tent so it becomes very condensed and if it starts to rain so dripping condensation down and it feels like it's raining through the tent.
    Last summer I rode and my 10 year old son 560 kilometers through a rainy Sweden and then we used this tent.
    It went well, but next time I will get a roomier and sturdier tents. If you want to read about our cycling adventure so I recommend my blog, where I write about adventures in everyday life and in the neighborhood.
    Näräventyr: Cykeläventyret 2012

    My bad english because google translate, read more about me and my adventures on the Web: http://naraventyr.blogspot.se/

  46. #96
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    The night between 16/1-17/1 I'll spend the night in the wild without tents.
    I do not have a good sleeping bag that is made for the winter so I put in two Summer / Autumn bags and pulling a bivy sack.
    I hope it does not get too cold.
    But wind sack is also an alternative to a tent.
    Have a good night's sleep
    My bad english because google translate, read more about me and my adventures on the Web: http://naraventyr.blogspot.se/

  47. #97
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    Mountain Hardware used to make a model called a Stiletto 1. They discontinued it, but I have one and think its about the best solo tent Ive ever seen or used. If you can find one on ebay or the internet its worth a look.

  48. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benajah View Post
    Mountain Hardware used to make a model called a Stiletto 1. They discontinued it, but I have one and think its about the best solo tent Ive ever seen or used. If you can find one on ebay or the internet its worth a look.
    Thank you for sharing the tent. It looked very nice
    My bad english because google translate, read more about me and my adventures on the Web: http://naraventyr.blogspot.se/

  49. #99
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    Here is my winter gear
    My bad english because google translate, read more about me and my adventures on the Web: http://naraventyr.blogspot.se/

  50. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Näräventyr View Post
    The night between 16/1-17/1 I'll spend the night in the wild without tents.
    I do not have a good sleeping bag that is made for the winter so I put in two Summer / Autumn bags and pulling a bivy sack.
    I hope it does not get too cold.
    But wind sack is also an alternative to a tent.
    Have a good night's sleep
    Today is 16 January here, so you go out tonight? Good luck and don`t freeze
    Recalculating....

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