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  1. #1
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    Reputation: Guy.Ford's Avatar
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    Question regarding seat bags for bikepacking

    This isn't a specific question regarding the Gear Jammer seat bag, but more a general question about bikepacking seat bags in general.
    Oveja Negra Gear Jammer Seat Bag

    Would a seat bag, size large, such as this be useful for commuting to carry a pair of shoes, pants, shirt, socks and boxers for work or would it not have enough space? Other suggestions? I dont want to use a backpack or mount racks on the bike, that the reason for choosing this type of bag.

    I know there is a commuting forum, but I feel bikepackers may have more experience with this type of seat bag and offer a better conclusion.

    Thanks for your time
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  2. #2
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    In the city, 10 times out of 10 I'd rather have Ortlieb panniers. They are 100% waterproof and come off super quickly when you lock your bike up. When you are commuting you generally don't care about aerodynamics, being low profile, or preserving handling over bumpy terrain, which are basically the only arguments for bikepacking bags.

    When I take the long way home, hitting all the trails I can, I often just wear a backpack, but I have, from time to time, when prepping for a bikepacking trip, used the bags already in place to hold a change of clothes.

    As a side note, I recommend just leaving a set of shoes at your office. Much easier than carrying a set in every day, and much better than forgetting to.

  3. #3
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    Blocked from accessing that link from work, but I did try my Revelate Vischacha for commuting and went back to a backpack. I kept shoes at work, so I was just packing slacks, polo, undies and socks - all rolled up. The Viscacha is not waterproof, so then I had to put my rolled up gear in a plastic grocery sack and then into the bag and finally, rolling it up and snugging it down. It was a hassle up front and then again to reverse the process to walk into work.

    I found it much simpler to use my backpack (which has rain cover attachment, easy to put on quickly). I could quickly roll up to the rack, lock the bike and walk right away to the showers.

    Keep in mind, my gear was very light. I ride in the Midwest of the USA - high humidity and temps in the summer.

    Pack was one of the larger CamelBaks - can't remember the model.

  4. #4
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    I took a trip recently using a Revelate Terrapin. I think the bag could easily fit a change of clothes, with shoes, but it's not the way I'd go for commuting. I felt like the seat bag worked best when it was rolled up tight, with no air gaps. It made the bag a nice, solid pack that didn't move around and was easy to tie in tightly. I expect a pair of shoes would have complicated that. Still, it would likely work. I don't consider it to be an easy-on/easy-off solution like my trunk bag or Ortleib panniers. I considered it to be a pain to access my bag mid-day, and tried to make sure when packing up in the morning, that I wasn't putting anything in there that I would need before stopping for the night. But then I also had other stuff strapped to the outside.

    I always prefer racks, and the only reason I have the Terrapin is because it's easier/lighter to put in my airline luggage. First thing I did when getting home from that trip was reinstall the rack. If you don't want a permanent rack, maybe look at a seatpost rack. I use a Topeak MTX seatpost rack on compatible bag on my folding bike. If I want to fold the bike up, the rack comes off in an instant.

    But if were really averse to any kind of rack, I think I'd be looking for a good, waterproof, handlebar bag that goes on and off easily.

  5. #5
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    I think there are better solutions for commuting. Seat bags are a bit more finicky with how they are packed than other bags, mostly they like to be packed full and tight.

    Right now I'm commuting on my fixie with just a frame bag and that's enough for my laptop, tools and a quick grocery run - but it's a big old-school road frame so the frame bag is huge. And I don't need to remove it since I bring my bike into the shop.
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  6. #6
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    Thanks everyone, looking at rack/bag solutions. Keep the rubber side down.

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  7. #7
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    ummm...

    I don't agree that seat bags are necessarily the poorer option for commuting. I think that depends on design of the seat bag and I agree the one shown by the OP isn't best choice. But the Porcelain Rocket Mr. Fusion or one similar should be just fine. The dry bag is waterproof and separate from the frame so very quick onto and off the bike, as well as being very stable. I have the Mr. Fusion shown and it doesn't change the bike's ride dynamics whatsoever, hardly know its there and snugs up secure regardless if the dry bag is full or half empty. I wouldn't hesitate to use it for commuting. I agree with the others, have other shoes to leave at work!
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  8. #8
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    I have a few Porcelain Rocket seatbags. They are awesome for bikepacking I don't use them for commuting because they work best when packed tightly which is not ideal with work clothes or a sandwich.

    I use a backpack for rides to work for my work stuff and a half-framebag to carry my bike related stuff [lock, tools, etc...]. For non-commutes I can ditch the pack and I still have all the bike stuff I need.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I have a few Porcelain Rocket seatbags. They are awesome for bikepacking I don't use them for commuting because they work best when packed tightly which is not ideal with work clothes or a sandwich.

    I use a backpack for rides to work for my work stuff and a half-framebag to carry my bike related stuff [lock, tools, etc...]. For non-commutes I can ditch the pack and I still have all the bike stuff I need.
    I have had the Mr. Fusion mounted on my fat bike all winter and spring, in fact it's still on there since I haven't bike packed yet this season. Often the dry bag is packed with very little, some tools, a spare tube, wallet, and maybe a rain jacket or warmer top. Never been an issue and I'm trail riding with it, road riding that should be even less of a factor. Regarding back packs, I have gone the other way. I used to ride with a back pack or hydration pack all the time but since getting these bike packing bags I avoid back packs unless absolutely necessary! So nice to ride and not have the sweaty back
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackCanoeDog View Post
    I used to ride with a back pack or hydration pack all the time but since getting these bike packing bags I avoid back packs unless absolutely necessary! So nice to ride and not have the sweaty back
    I've never had an issue with packs. I hammer when I ride to work so I am sweaty all over. I've gone without a pack a couple times when I had stuff at work already and it's a marginal improvement. Not worth having to try and fit my work stuff into the awkward shape of a bikepacking seatbag.

    I also don't want a seatbag on my road bike when I am not carrying stuff and the Mr.Fusion is a hassle to remove/install frequently.
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  11. #11
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    If I wanted to skip the pack I'd get a full frame bag for my bike. With a decent width I could probably fit all my work related items inside and the shape makes more sense for clothes, lunch and a laptop.

    That said the pack doesn't bother me at all so it's not worth the effort/$$.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I also don't want a seatbag on my road bike when I am not carrying stuff and the Mr.Fusion is a hassle to remove/install frequently.
    True!
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  13. #13
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    FWIW, I'm commuting on my fatbike as the ride is under 10 miles.



    I'm not fond of wearing packs, that's why I was looking at other solutions. Currently I've decided to go this route, Topeak Uni Super Tourist Fatbike Rack and Topeak MTX Trunkbag DXP.
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  14. #14
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    I don't think that a seatbag is ideal for what you are wanting to do. I am lucky as we have a shower and lockers where I work, so I keep clothes there and don't have to worry about carrying them along.

    I have taken one of my bikepacking bikes and converted it to a commuter around town bike. I am likely going to put my Thule Pack-n-Pedal on it and use it with a dry bag though.
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  15. #15
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    Sorted it, this was my decision, thanks everyone



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  16. #16
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    That is my preferred rack and bag combo for commuting. I hope it works out for you.

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