Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    32

    Push-a-bike handlebar extension for offroad touring?

    Offroad touring always means long stretches of push-a-bike. Has anyone adapted the Vietcong handlebar extension for this and did it work?

    During a long tour in the mountains, I was pushing the bike for 4-5 miles at a stretch due to mud, rocks, and grade, it really sucked.

    I know that the Viet Cong adopted a handlebar extension for their transport bikes that moved the left handlebar out a foot or so, so that your body wasn't as twisted up while pushing with left hand on the bar extension and right hand on the back of the seat.

    Like this. Sorry, only picture I could find.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    19
    I too am interested in this! Sorry I don't have anything for ya but wanna know what you guys come up with.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    42
    Here in the Canadian sub-arctic, lots of winter-bike commuting with groceries in bad snow conditions, I usually revert to the pulk sled. However, I am having a used Surly Pugsley built up with studded tires, racks, fenders, kickstand, for commuting. Jones Bars are worth a look, I have a set in the mail, as they do allow a pushing hand position which is further from the centreline of the bike, thus less likely that your feet will tangle with the pedals when bike-pushing. Especially enormous Bunnie Boots with townie ice crampons glued to them...

    Hm, one could always cut some bamboo or PVC piping so it would fit over the right hand-grip....

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    19
    Was thinking about this some more and I think something akin to the clamp on a park tool workstand would give you enough leverage if you were to clamp it on the top tube while struggling up a hill. Not sure where you would buy just the clamp itself but I'm sure someone could rig something up

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    752
    When I'm in for a sizable push, I remove the left pedal. I prefer to push from the left side of the bike, I'm left handed. That's probably the reason.

    There is nothing worse than having to dodge a pedal for an extended time. One minute to remove the pedal and one minute to replace, if that. I use Lithium grease as an anti-corrosion paste so the pedal comes off easily. If you're not dodging the pedal the push it is far easier than being twisted to avoid being struck by it. I've wide SPD/platform pedals with teeth ... and a few scars on the back of my right calf, to prove it.

    We've all done that, being bear trapped from behind?

    Warren.

  6. #6
    A guy on a bike Moderator
    Reputation: TobyGadd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    923
    Quote Originally Posted by Wild Wassa View Post
    There is nothing worse than having to dodge a pedal for an extended time.
    On the Colorado Trail Race, I decided that the proper name for my Crank Brother pedals should be LEG Beaters.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: druidh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    670
    Thread a strap through the saddle rails and onto your waist belt. That means your legs/body are doing all the hard work and you only need a light pressure on the bars to steer.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jaredbe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    255
    I like your idea druidh. I could see adding a strap like this to my hydration pack waist strap.
    I use a frame bag system like my revelate bags. No panniers sticking out equals an open push area (other than the pedal).
    laotzucycles.blogspot.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •