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  1. #26
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    My "base" packing set-up...
    FILE0018

    With the "Mav-Rack" ... when beer and/or heavier food are involved...
    FILE2019

  2. #27
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    Hey VB...

    Thanks for the perspective. I've not discussed this with anyone before. Sure he's no doubt overloaded with work, but taking care of his customers should come before a personal vacation. That's just good business in my book. I was told a two month wait. Then sent an email two months later touching base. Was told my bag was a few weeks out yet. Then six weeks later I get a mass email saying he's taking a two week vacation. Just not good business.

    This is what I would have done. He did stop taking orders on frame bags until he got caught up. Good plan.....but I would have filled all custom bag orders then taken my vacation....then put the word out I'm accepting new frame bag orders. Not leave people hanging who've been waiting several months to take their vacation.

    I'm not sweating the small stuff. I'm in business and know you need to be dedicated and professional.....and you're personal life comes between satisfying you're customers. I think Eric has gotten fat....and isn't that hungry anymore. He's going to get a bad name which will hurt him in the long run if he doesn't go back to basics and put his customers first.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Repoman84 View Post
    Half-fat on Drummond Island last month. Sleeping bag, pad, and bivy bag in the Epic/Revelate sling; stove, pump, food and hatchet in the frame bag. Camera, tools, snacks, compass in the gas tank bag.
    Extra clothes were in a compression bag strapped to the seat, but that was a failure, so they ended up in my REI daypack along with an insulated jacket, rain clothes and my old camelback res.
    Beautiful bike! I've been curious if cantis even work around the tires. How do you stop the rear wheel?

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ward View Post
    My "base" packing set-up...
    FILE0018

    With the "Mav-Rack" ... when beer and/or heavier food are involved...
    FILE2019
    Cool setup! Do you happen to have any more pics?

  5. #30
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    Interway's, Here it is "empty" w/ both racks on...

    FILE2022

    And it's groovy "adventure touring" peddles...

    FILE0041

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ward View Post
    Interway's, Here it is "empty" w/ both racks on...

    FILE2022

    And it's groovy "adventure touring" peddles...

    FILE0041
    Thanks for the pics. Looks like you have made some cool and useful modifications.

  7. #32
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    27 tpi Larry to the rear

    [QUOTE=suba;8173594] I might have put the 27 on the rear only because steering and going over bumps might work out better with the 120 on the front. Nothing scientific, just a guess. QUOTE]

    Suba, I think you're right. I ran the 27 on the front for a few days at various pressures (from 8 to 15 psi] and it seemed like there was more resistance on rougher trails. On the road, I couldn't really tell the difference. I considered this possibility before mounting them, but decided to put the 120 on the rear cause I thought the additional suppleness and higher thread count casing might be better suited to handle low pressure deformation and provide better traction. After switching to 120 front and 27 rear, the bike handles better and feels livelier (a relative term in the world of fatbikes). The difference was more pronounced than I anticipated. I wonder how well the 27 will hold up on the rear.

  8. #33
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    Is there a reason why almost no one uses traditional panniers? Is it an issue with narrow single track catching panniers on racks? I was planning on using my old roadie cycle camping panniers but now I am thinking about a duffle bag stapped to a rack. Any thoughts?

  9. #34
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    Mostly I think its because off road bikepackers try to go super light, and the new style of rackless bags is a bit lighter. The dry bag on a rack is also very economical and easy.

    There may be some benefit to keeping the weight in line with the center of the bike, but if you notice, the guys who are heavily laden usually use panniers as well.

    Let us know either way, there are a lot of ways to skin a cat.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by icecreamjay View Post
    Mostly I think its because off road bikepackers try to go super light, and the new style of rackless bags is a bit lighter. The dry bag on a rack is also very economical and easy.

    There may be some benefit to keeping the weight in line with the center of the bike, but if you notice, the guys who are heavily laden usually use panniers as well.

    Let us know either way, there are a lot of ways to skin a cat.
    I've also heard talk about losing the weight of the racks as one big reason for going rackless. This seems a bit much on a loaded for touring fatbike in normal circumstances. I drill my rims but still like racks. For Epic adventures like the Lost Coast, super light and on center makes sense to me but for riding on snowmachine trails or summer trails where there is a trail panniers work.

  11. #36
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    One reason I would not use panniers on a fatbike is because the bike would be taken places that are difficult. The constant getting on and off is made harder with panniers.

    Also they allow a lot of weight over the rear axle, so the bike is clumsy when you have to manhandle it. Of course the last objection can be handled by not putting anything heavy in the panniers.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  12. #37
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    new to the fat bikes, they are awesome

  13. #38
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    Fat Bike Bikepacking

    Hey Gang,

    Here's my Pugsley set up for those times when I am traveling light and predominantly on demanding singletrack



    Seatbag, gastank, and front sling and pocket made by Eric at Revelate. The frame bag is just a readily available Jandd with two of the attachment straps moved (45 minutes with a Speedy Stitcher) so it could be mounted backwards. It wouldn't otherwise fit in the triangle of the small frame, and, at any rate, this arrangement leaves room for a water bottle. I also wear a backpack.

    Obviously, there's a lot going for this type of rackless bag configuration. Lighter weight, centering the load, compliant/non-bending and easily repaired material for rough conditions. Folks realized this more-or-less from the start.

    But I think Pursuiter is right to wonder

    Is there a reason why almost no one uses traditional panniers? Is it an issue with narrow single track catching panniers on racks? I was planning on using my old roadie cycle camping panniers but now I am thinking about a duffle bag stapped to a rack. Any thoughts?
    I guess some people are dogmatic about bikepacking so that in their mind using panniers violates the definition. Of course, that's silly. There are plenty of reasons someone might want to use racks and panniers. They are easier to pack, they often make it easier to access gear, they are great for heavier and bulkier loads, and I like them for when I will be removing and re-attaching the bags pretty frequently. And not least of all, like Pursuiter, a lot of people already have panniers.

    As far as singletrack, well, there's the smooth kind and then the not-smooth kind. Panniers are perfectly fine for the smooth kind, even if it's narrow and tight. Fat bikes are inherently pretty stable, so I've never had a balance issue, even with a big cargo. Rackless bags come into their own for the not-so-smooth kind, and, again, if you're trying to save weight and do more demanding moves on the bike. In my experience, the trail has to be pretty techy to rule out panniers.

    Anyway, like people above have said, I think which bags you use depends on a lot of things, and panniers remain for a lot of us a totally viable option.

    Touring Alaska:

    Arkel XM-45 panniers, OMM Cold Springs rear rack, Revelate sling/pocket with a generic duffel bag resting on a Nitto Mark's front rack.

    Riding the Lost Lake/Primrose trail, Alaska:

  14. #39
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    Bikepacking gear test

    Just returned from an overnighter to test my setup for a longer trip later this month. Bags include a Revelate frame bag, Revelate harness w/ small pocket strapped around a drybag, Ortlieb backroller panniers, and an Axiom trunk rack trunk I strapped on at the last minute instead of another drybag. The rack is a Bontrager BR-1. The trip was a 60 miles of gravel roads, mostly in fairly good condition, but with occasional rougher sections that I sought out for testing purposes. I was carrying 35-40 lbs, a laughably (except on the hills) heavy load for one night, but this was a test. Since it was all on roads, I suppose this is technically bike touring, not bikepacking. For bikepacking on singletrack, where I’m off the saddle more throwing the bike around, I'd leave the Ortliebs at home and use one large drybag on the rear rack.

    Ortliebs- Rock solid, even in the rough stuff. No rattling, swaying, bouncing. They haul a lot, too. Simple one bag design and waterproof. . They are very adjustable and fit my touring bike rack, an Axiom, too. Impressive.

    Harness- With 8lbs of sleeping bag, pad and clothing, the harness swayed more than I liked when rigged like the photos on the Revelate website. I could feel it through the handlebars and it caused the bike to wobble and feel unbalanced. I was starting to think it wouldn’t work for technical singletrack and I was disappointed because Revelate is known for quality gear. On the way home, I decided to try lacing the two pocket straps over the handlebars instead of underneath the bars, around the bag. This gave the harness/bag four points of contact with the bars and widened the contact points. Problem solved! To check it out further, I took a detour through a rough section of doubletrack. No sway. No wobble. Perfect. The small pocket was handy for holding little items. Wanted the larger one, but it was out of stock.

    Axiom - Nice, simple bag. Mounts securely and stays put.

    Revelate frame bag - Very nice. There’s a reason people rate them highly. I haven’t taken it off for months.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-loaded.jpg  

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-wide-load.jpg  


  15. #40
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    Loving this thread Keep them coming, also want to see the kit you guys take with you

  16. #41
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    here's mine from last year:
    heading out in 6hrs.
    pugs on the Umpqua

    the setup was pretty economical - all bags came from army surplus except for the frame bag which i sewed. i really want to get a revelate seatbag when my bike funds recoup. the dry bag as a seat bag worked, but access my stuff in there was a pain.

    i was planning on doing the same trip in a couple weeks (without getting lost) on my new 29er to see if i could go any farther in a day (averaged about 70mi/day on the pugs), but a single track-related shoulder sprain is forcing me to stick to a road tour until i heal up.

    my next fat goal is to get in some bikepacking on Mt. Hood this winter! anyone interested?

  17. #42
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    April 20th - Over Night Bivi Thinking by Johnclimber


    May 4th - Bivi Planning by Johnclimber
    Ok so this was taking in my back garden but each bivi night was a clear sky so I used the tarp as a ground sheet instead

  18. #43
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    Another day of rain & no real interest in heading out, but some quality time was had in the shed

    The new brooks saddle was fitted along with the front rack to match the rear. Also tried out the winter mods - double lizard skin headset protectors, double rear mudguard extensions on the rack & front splash guard.

    I'm still playing around with bag options & bivi kit, so just posting up the bare bike for now.
    Excuse the poor first pic, lighting wasn't too good inside....





    These racks ARE level, but the grass isn't.....

    Drink coffee....ride bikes....eat cake
    http://morayfatbike.blogspot.com

  19. #44
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    That fence needs some woodstain motorman

    My summer Bivvy set up,

    001 by coastkid71, on Flickr

    Added a top peak seat post frame rack which holds a 15 litre sealine bag with Alpkit hunka XL bivvvy, 3/4 thermarest, and a 1 season Karrimor synthetic bag,
    Epic frame bag holds a MSR pocket rocket stove, gas canister, Alpkit 750ml Titanium pot/mug, fire starter,spork, bog roll, travel tooth brush kit (i like to smile alot...)
    instant soups,tea, cereal bars etc...
    bike tools in lower compartment,
    compact camera and gorilla pod in gas tank bag,

    just realised i have not fitted bottle cages to forks, this carries 3 litres and takes a lot of weight off the shoulders,

    Karrimor back pack just used for 2-3 litres of water, paclite jacket, 3 season long sleeve top and Go pro camera and chest mount ect...

    Off tomorrow night again back down over the border into Englandshire on a Blitzkrieg micro adventure to explore more coastline
    plan it...build it....ride it...love it....
    http://coastkid.blogspot.com/

  20. #45
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    Great pictures all!!

  21. #46
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    a recent 30 miler 1 night camp trip, just fer fun.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-securedownload-12.jpg  

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-securedownload-10.jpg  

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-securedownload-11.jpg  


  22. #47
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    Great pics folks, keep them coming! Good to see so many different set ups

    Thanks for observing CK...........I though I had posted on singletrack for a moment. I will get on it soon

    Really liking the revelate frame bags, but with long delivery times I might just be lucky enough to get one delivered from Santa. Seems such a good idea to have large portion of weight so low down, such as tools, tubes, stoves etc.

    I'm also fitting cages to the forks for coffee flasks for all day outing
    Have a good trip at the weekend
    Drink coffee....ride bikes....eat cake
    http://morayfatbike.blogspot.com

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by motorman View Post
    ...Thanks for observing CK...........I though I had posted on singletrack for a moment...
    Funny that, I thought I was reading stw too. An unstained fence is a sign of riding time not being wasted

    BTW want to hook up for a ride somewhere in between Dingwall & yourself? It would be slow
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Funny that, I thought I was reading stw too. An unstained fence is a sign of riding time not being wasted

    BTW want to hook up for a ride somewhere in between Dingwall & yourself? It would be slow
    Exactly, if the weather is good enough for exterior painting, then it is time for riding...

    Yeah, meet would be good, I'm away for a weeks riding to Aviemore, but I will be around 24/7 for the following 2 weeks after that, will give you a shout when I'm back. Slow is good
    Drink coffee....ride bikes....eat cake
    http://morayfatbike.blogspot.com

  25. #50
    A Surly Maverick
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    Heads up for Uk Pug and 907 owners.........

    If you have a Poundstretcher in town they are selling aluminium pannier racks 1/2 price for £7.49 !
    I bought one to try and was very surprised to find that it was VERY adjustable right out of the box !

    It fit the rear of the Pug with minimal modification, just a bit of gentle bending and an approx 7mm spacer on the lower none drive rack mount so it doesn`t interfeer with the (mechanical) disc brake arm.

    I bought another and they will also fit the front Pug fork with minimal modding again. The front rack needs to be set in the highest position and then the top fork mount adjustable rail mounts need to be mounted near verically and shortened......that`s it !

    They are also selling rear panniers for .......£7.49 again

    So that`s front and rear racks + panniers for £22.47 .

    They may not be `NICE` but they are GREAT !
    A Fatback'd Lefty for who life IS a Beach

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