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  1. #101
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    Summer is here, so bump for a top thread....

    I got this small frame bag today for only £13 Excellent little bag, that will work well enough this summer, until I get the custom gear made, which will take a little time.





    Enough room for most items & both cages can be accessed This I like

    I will post back later in the week with more fatpacking news

    Keep the pics coming folks
    Drink coffee....ride bikes....eat cake
    http://morayfatbike.blogspot.com

  2. #102
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    Motorman, just a little question, is that a B17 Standard or a Narrow?

  3. #103
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    I really like my revelate bags.
    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-uploadfromtaptalk1351898650307.jpg  

    laotzucycles.blogspot.com

  4. #104
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    Very Nice!

    Quote Originally Posted by bmike View Post
    Here's a partial setup pic with my (Epic!) Revelate seat bag and mountain feed bag from a long day ride:

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/31827372@N00/5395752015/" title="IMAG1482 by mbeganyi, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4130/5395752015_054a5fbbbf_z.jpg" width="640" height="383" alt="IMAG1482"></a>



    I have a front harness that I've used on my road bike for overnight touring. Hoping to get out next year on the Pugs for a winter overnight.
    How do you like the Surly so far?

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by triman3 View Post
    How do you like the Surly so far?
    love it. bought it at the right price just before the muk 1 was release. would have liked to get the new muk with alternators... but i had one of the best winters ever to ride that pugs.

    currently have a full frame bag for it, along with a jerry can and gas tank. thinking about a winter overnight, but not sure if i have the right gear yet. depends on the weather and if i get to a lean to or not...

  6. #106
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    Salsa Ti Mukluk with Porcelain Rocket bags in Winter Mode
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    Adventurer | Photographer | Writer
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  7. #107
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    Here's my Pugger on an overnighter last week.


  8. #108
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    Something n this thread seems wrong to me, I wold seem the bikes are getting fat and the bags are getting skinny! Is it my computer or is this true? I thought it was supposed to be the other way around! LOL
    “An adventure is misery and discomfort, relived in the safety of reminiscence.” Marco Polo

  9. #109
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    B17 Standard
    Drink coffee....ride bikes....eat cake
    http://morayfatbike.blogspot.com

  10. #110
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    Thank you
    I really like the B17, but find it way to wide to get behing on technical descends

  11. #111
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    No problem.

    Here is mine from a few months ago

    Drink coffee....ride bikes....eat cake
    http://morayfatbike.blogspot.com

  12. #112
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    Maybe a silly question, but why fat bikes for bikepacking and why not just a normal rigid bike that would pedal much more efficiently? Not trolling or anything just curious why fat bikes so often go with bike packing.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by GnarBrahWyo View Post
    Maybe a silly question, but why fat bikes for bikepacking and why not just a normal rigid bike that would pedal much more efficiently? Not trolling or anything just curious why fat bikes so often go with bike packing.
    With higher pressure in the fat tires it isn't really much less efficient to pedal than a normal rigid bike.

    The reason you see more fatbikes for bikepacking here, is probably that MTBR is more aimed towards offroad riding. Fatbikes do make sense offroad, both during the winter and summer.

    I personally have (only) two bikes and both are used for bikepacking. When there are significant sections on road planned, I take my Salsa Fargo. Otherwise I ride a Salsa Mukluk. Road only riding does not interest me.
    My outdoor blog: www.yetirides.com

  14. #114
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    My bike in winter overnighter mode:


    My outdoor blog: www.yetirides.com

  15. #115
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    BG weighed, packed and ready for 1st solo adventure

    Riding solo from Carmacks, Yukon back to my home in Whitehorse, Yukon. I will follow the Yukon Quest trail which has a small window from beginning of February to mid February. 26 dog teams registered this year to date and snowmobile support will pack this section heading on to Fairbanks, AK. I will attempt to ride this in 2-3 days depending on weather and trail conditions. I did the 160k section last year starting from Braeburn to Whitehorse in 2 days, yet it typically gets done in one. My Muk3 was carrying too much gear, upgraded to my new Salsa BearGrease which is tuned into a lighter beast as I get better at packing. I love this bike for its weight, nimbleness, and fun meter factor when out riding

    I will take pictures while out on the trail and hopefully blog after the trip as this section is deemed one of the tougher sections of the 1000+ miles of the YQ. I have a detailed excel spreadsheet someone designed for bike packing I found on the web if anyone is interested in weights and distribution.

    Scott at Porcelain Rocket did an amazing job on my bags. The only thing I wished was a bit bigger on the BG is the frame bag as I am riding a small frame!

    Check out Yukon Quest Trail for details on trail and even a 3-D Fly over which does not work with Firefox; Safari does though
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-dsc_0019.jpg  

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    2015 Salsa BearGrease Aluminum w/carbon fork

  16. #116
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    Derek - great looking set up. All the best on your first solo trip.

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek.Endress View Post
    Riding solo from Carmacks, Yukon back to my home in Whitehorse, Yukon. I will follow the Yukon Quest trail which has a small window from beginning of February to mid February. 26 dog teams registered this year to date and snowmobile support will pack this section heading on to Fairbanks, AK. I will attempt to ride this in 2-3 days depending on weather and trail conditions. I did the 160k section last year starting from Braeburn to Whitehorse in 2 days, yet it typically gets done in one. My Muk3 was carrying too much gear, upgraded to my new Salsa BearGrease which is tuned into a lighter beast as I get better at packing. I love this bike for its weight, nimbleness, and fun meter factor when out riding

    I will take pictures while out on the trail and hopefully blog after the trip as this section is deemed one of the tougher sections of the 1000+ miles of the YQ. I have a detailed excel spreadsheet someone designed for bike packing I found on the web if anyone is interested in weights and distribution.

    Scott at Porcelain Rocket did an amazing job on my bags. The only thing I wished was a bit bigger on the BG is the frame bag as I am riding a small frame!

    Check out Yukon Quest Trail for details on trail and even a 3-D Fly over which does not work with Firefox; Safari does though
    Why do you have your grips on backward?
    “An adventure is misery and discomfort, relived in the safety of reminiscence.” Marco Polo

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek.Endress View Post
    Riding solo from Carmacks, Yukon back to my home in Whitehorse, Yukon.
    ...
    That is one extremely good looking setup. Good luck on the trip, it looks very interesting.
    My outdoor blog: www.yetirides.com

  19. #119
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    Awesome looking bags. I absolutely love the white. Scott does such an amazing job. Best of luck on the trip. I am headed to AK in two weeks for my own winter fatbikes tour.

    Cheers.

    Glenn
    Adventurer | Photographer | Writer
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  20. #120
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    Davie Hogan a.k.a. Lard Ass. A little fat going far

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-img_5831.jpg


    A little heavy for the places I ride. A little light for a world tour.

    Bike Grease and Coffee

  21. #121
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    Sat. on my S24, in the Mojave Desert.

    I dig dirt!

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildfire View Post
    Stove, cookpot, food, fuel, -20 bag, pad, tent, down parka, primaloft pants, pogies,etc. Rear pack has internal stays which bolt to the frame's rack mounts to prevent swaying and mounts low enough to be able to swing your leg over it easily. No racks needed.
    Hey there, that seat bag looks great, nice and stable. I wanted one for my Fargo, what exact make is it?

  23. #123
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    Here is my rig on the remote 2 week trip I did down Salsipuedes canyon in Mexico last month. When I started I had 40 litres of water! A Pugsley with Extrawheel trailer and Alpackaraft.

    All I am saying is give pizza chants

  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_BC View Post
    Here is my rig on the remote 2 week trip I did down Salsipuedes canyon in Mexico last month. When I started I had 40 litres of water! A Pugsley with Extrawheel trailer and Alpackaraft.

    Would you recommend the Extrawheel?

  25. #125
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    Yeah it is a good trailer. I'd still rather go trailer-less but if you need it to haul stuff then I'd say it's the best one I have used. Securing it to the offset Pugsley is a pain in the a$$. They don't make them anymore with these sidebags, instead with pannier mount racks.

    Here is the blog entry for that trip, still need to add more photos:

    BajaNomad Forums - "Peace, Love & Fish Tacos"
    All I am saying is give pizza chants

  26. #126
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    Current setup. Half Fat. Fixed Gear 36x16.
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    Mr. Krabs: Is it true, Squidward? Is it hilarious?

  27. #127
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    Its a bit more than I would carry just to go out for a few days out but it was a moose hunt and needed the extra gear.
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  28. #128
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    IMG_2184 by mbeganyi, on Flickr



    QBP glamour shot by mbeganyi, on Flickr

  29. #129
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    Here's my setup. 2015 Salsa Bucksaw. Picture from a few weeks ago in Iceland.

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-img_2828-version22_zps497d6e65.jpg

  30. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quitou View Post
    Here's my setup. 2015 Salsa Bucksaw. Picture from a few weeks ago in Iceland.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Holy krap! That is the setup I dream about as I wait for my Bucksaw, which is what I will be doing for the next several months. You must own Salsa or something, to have gotten your hands on that bike this early.

    I've gotta say, I had written off a frame bag is being impossible/impractical and with one glance at your photo, my mind is instantly changed.

    Wow, super sweet setup!

  31. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by spovegas View Post
    Holy krap! That is the setup I dream about as I wait for my Bucksaw, which is what I will be doing for the next several months. You must own Salsa or something, to have gotten your hands on that bike this early.

    I've gotta say, I had written off a frame bag is being impossible/impractical and with one glance at your photo, my mind is instantly changed.

    Wow, super sweet setup!
    I have been on this Bucksaw since April and have used in all over AZ, Moab, and on a two-week bikepack in Iceland's interior. It's amazing.

    First Ride: 2015 Salsa Bucksaw Full-Suspension Fatbike | Expedition Portal

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-img_3463_zpsc17f51eb.jpg

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-img_3004-version31_zps6ec03e2c.jpg

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-img_2853-version2_zpsc2942579.jpg

    The set up is pretty clean. I use Bedrock Bags all around. The bike itself is stock, no need to modify a thing. It is an outstanding platform.

  32. #132
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    Just awesome. Thanks for the additional pics and info.

    I read your EP article back in May and it was one of the pieces that contributed to me getting so jacked up about this bike. Until your post here, however, I had not come across anyone writing about its potential as a bikepacking rig. I was daydreaming about that possibility almost immediately after becoming aware of the Bucksaw. This certainly stokes that fire.

  33. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by spovegas View Post
    Until your post here, however, I had not come across anyone writing about its potential as a bikepacking rig.
    Obviously, its prowess as a bikepacking rig is highly dependent on where you plan to take it, but for my last trip it was ideal. That trip had everything from multi-hour tarmac sessions to black sand beach, to volcanic sand desert, snow in the high passes, singletrack and even loads of rocky river bed amidst the braided rivers. The Bucksaw just ate it all up. Naturally, it will have times when it isn't the ideal bike, but those moments are few and far between and the penalty is minimal.

    Wonderful bike. When it comes time to get bags for yours, give Andrew at Bedrock a buzz. The frame bag he made for me was absolutely perfect. Not an easy bag to make as it has to fit around a lot of cable and housing complicators, namely the port for the internal dropper post.

  34. #134
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    I would love to Bikepack with the one I have on the way. Good to know that a frame bag is totally feasible. I won't be using a dropper on mine, so that won't be a problem.

    Mine will be seeing much more mundane locations for the most part.

  35. #135
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    Don't give up on the dropper post. I loath the dropper post....or did. I find I actually like having it and use it more than I thought I would. It helps extract that much more performance out of the Bucksaw.

  36. #136
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    Here's my Pugsley in bikepack mode over the Labor Day weekend:

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-img_0436.jpg
    Spinymouse

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  37. #137
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    That's a great setup. I really dig that bike; although I would definitely swap out those suspect brakes and run the 45North tubeless, carbon rims. And those are some great shots. I really dig the expedition portal site as well by the way. Keep up the good work.



    Quote Originally Posted by Quitou View Post
    I have been on this Bucksaw since April and have used in all over AZ, Moab, and on a two-week bikepack in Iceland's interior. It's amazing.

    First Ride: 2015 Salsa Bucksaw Full-Suspension Fatbike | Expedition Portal

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    The set up is pretty clean. I use Bedrock Bags all around. The bike itself is stock, no need to modify a thing. It is an outstanding platform.

  38. #138
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    2012 Fatback Aluminum with carbon fork, full Sram XO, 90mm UMA's, Thomson and Ritchey hardware and Full Revelate bag Setup and Procelain Rocket fork bags. Love this bike. Been on many different bikepacking trips with her and she never lets me down.
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  39. #139
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    Surly Ice Cream Truck

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  40. #140
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    Krampus...

    Krampus in its Element by mbeganyi, on Flickr

  41. #141
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    Re: Silversurfer

    Where are some good overnight bike packing trails around Canmore? I'd like to do some overnight and multi day rides but can't find good trails to ride. Suggestions for Kananaskis/Canmore/Banff/Jasper?

  42. #142
    Chris Bling
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    Great looking rigs! Are you guys running tubes or tubeless on your fatbike bikepacking adventures?
    The obsession of wheels fused with the passion of cycling
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  43. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by dustyduke22 View Post
    Great looking rigs! Are you guys running tubes or tubeless on your fatbike bikepacking adventures?
    i'm running split tube tubeless on my krampus. rabbit hole rim, rim strip, 1 wrap of gorilla tape just to keep the rim strip in place, 24" tube. aired right up.

    shop rebuilt my wheel with the rohloff and used the same tube to and got it all to seat up with minimal fuss.

  44. #144
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    Another Kromp, here on a solo trip last February.


    image by kullaberg631, on Flickr

  45. #145
    Big wheels keep on rollin
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    Quote Originally Posted by jan_nikolajsen View Post
    Another Kromp, here on a solo trip last February.


    image by kullaberg631, on Flickr
    Jan, clicked on your Flickr site... I want to fave almost all your pictures!

    mike

  46. #146
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    One more of my December Willow ride. Missing my Relevate D. Pika bag and my two anything cages on this trip.
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  47. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildfire View Post
    Stove, cookpot, food, fuel, -20 bag, pad, tent, down parka, primaloft pants, pogies,etc. Rear pack has internal stays which bolt to the frame's rack mounts to prevent swaying and mounts low enough to be able to swing your leg over it easily. No racks needed.
    What did you buy for your -20 bag?
    - 2016 Trek Farley 7
    - 2015 Salsa Fargo
    - Norco Brian Leech Trials

  48. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by slooowfoot View Post
    What did you buy for your -20 bag?
    It's an REI Kilo Expedition, 800 fill-power down bag.

  49. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thirstymead View Post
    Hey there, that seat bag looks great, nice and stable. I wanted one for my Fargo, what exact make is it?
    I made it myself. Thanks, it works well.

  50. #150
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    For the past three riding seasons, I've been fat-packing on my 9:Zero:7, with custom home-built racks and more traditional bags . . .

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-907.jpg

    This past year, I set the 9:Zero:7 free and threw down on a Blackborow and am going the soft bags route. I had my first outing of the year a coupla weeks ago . . .

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-bb.jpg

    Even though it doesn't look like it, the BB setup is quite a bit lighter. There's just a ton of weight associated with racks. The BB still sports a rear rack, just b/c rear racks are so damned useful, but it's an aluminum jobbie and relatively light.

    Whereas water hauling was done on the frame in V.1, it's being done in the backpack bladder on V.2. We'll see how that goes.

    Taking quality photos while out on trips is a big deal to me, and the V.1 setup involved packing a full-on DSLR in the handlebar bag. For the latest setup, I've switched to a mirrorless camera, which is far more compact and saves several pounds. It still sits in a very accessible, but much smaller, bar bag.

    I really dig bikepacking on a fatbike - it's just so damn comfortable. I have a lot of refinement to do to my setup, obviously, but that's half the fun.

    One thing I have a question about, for those of you that have done a fair amount of bikepacking with soft packs, is how you deal with abrasion to your frame paint. Mine is wearing fast and bigtime. I'm not all that anal about appearance, but at the same time, it's hard to look the other way when your frame is getting sanded all to hell at 9 different places just by your frame bag alone. The frame is aluminum and so I'm not worried about corrosion, but it still seems somehow wrong to just ignore this. Maybe some helicopter tape? Although it seems like it would take a lot of time and effort? Or just not worry about it?

    What say you . . .

  51. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by spovegas View Post

    One thing I have a question about, for those of you that have done a fair amount of bikepacking with soft packs, is how you deal with abrasion to your frame paint. Mine is wearing fast and bigtime. I'm not all that anal about appearance, but at the same time, it's hard to look the other way when your frame is getting sanded all to hell at 9 different places just by your frame bag alone. The frame is aluminum and so I'm not worried about corrosion, but it still seems somehow wrong to just ignore this. Maybe some helicopter tape? Although it seems like it would take a lot of time and effort? Or just not worry about it?

    What say you . . .
    That bothers me too. I wrapped my new bike frame in cling-film and scotch tape on the frame area where there's contact with bags. I did a blog post on the setup with a couple pics here Protecting Bike Frame for Bikepacking Duties?
    It works really well so far....
    Just a fat old guy riding a fat old bike...
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  52. #152
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    Thanks, rooze, that's a creative approach.

    I also did a quick search and turned up some opinions/ideas here and here and here.

    My recent trip was a particularly muddy one, so that accelerated the wear for sure. I think I'll order some helicopter tape and try it out in a few of the high wear spots.

  53. #153
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    I use 3m heli tape where the bags rub on the frame.
    Nothing ventured, nothing gained ... http://doricdiversions.com

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  54. #154
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    I gave up after a while
    All I am saying is give pizza chants

  55. #155
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    The setup:
    Salsa Blackborrow DS
    Anything cages: tent on the left, sleeping pad on the right
    Sleeping bag off the handle bars
    Revelate Frame bag and Visacha seat bag for everything else
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-image.jpg  

    "Events in the past may be roughly divided into those which probably never happened and those which do not matter."

  56. #156
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    Are these new Anything Cages that don't crack?
    All I am saying is give pizza chants

  57. #157
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    DSC01737 copy by kullaberg631, on Flickr

    Krampus, On One Inbred, Santa Cruz Highball.

  58. #158
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    ^^^Righteous^^^

  59. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_BC View Post
    Are these new Anything Cages that don't crack?
    Get the new HD Anything cage - no more issues!


    As usual, Jan is living right!

  60. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by SurlyBuckeye View Post
    The setup:
    Salsa Blackborrow DS
    Anything cages: tent on the left, sleeping pad on the right
    Sleeping bag off the handle bars
    Revelate Frame bag and Visacha seat bag for everything else
    I like your setup. Do you mind me asking what tent you are using?

    I have Revelate designs sweetroll and visacha due to arrive in the mail tomorrow, but I'm going to need a smaller tent and more compact bag to run without my usual panniers....
    Just a fat old guy riding a fat old bike...
    Follow my antics at tent.bike

  61. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by rooze View Post
    I like your setup. Do you mind me asking what tent you are using?.
    Using a REI Quarter Dome 2

    Mark_BC...
    They are the new anything cage HD, working well so far
    "Events in the past may be roughly divided into those which probably never happened and those which do not matter."

  62. #162
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    The camel on last week's bikepacking trip across the Galilee, northern Israel.

    It's a 2011 Pugsley with Titec J-bars (which I'm undecided on - I don't get much use out of the extra hand positions, and I don't like the handling), duct-tape-based ghetto tubeless setup, and five water bottles clamped to the frame. Weight of bike unloaded = effin' heavy. Weight of bike loaded = even worse.

    Tent, sleeping bag, and odds and ends in the handlebar roll. Food in the frame pack. Clothes and potset/stove in the saddlebag, and Thermarest rolled up on top of that. Overflow food capacity in a backpack, which I probably could have done without.

    The fat tires really weren't necessary at all on this ride; they were more suited to last month's ride in Jordan (Southern Jordan - Julian Bender - Travels and Photos). The worst conditions I encountered, tire width couldn't help with - sticky mud that clogged the drivetrain, making not only riding, but even walking impossible. Don't ride here after rain...

    Rest of the photos: Bikepacking the Galilee - Album on Imgur
    www.julianbender.net

    Pictures of bike trips, hikes, and other travels

  63. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by spovegas View Post
    One thing I have a question about, for those of you that have done a fair amount of bikepacking with soft packs, is how you deal with abrasion to your frame paint. Mine is wearing fast and bigtime. I'm not all that anal about appearance, but at the same time, it's hard to look the other way when your frame is getting sanded all to hell at 9 different places just by your frame bag alone. The frame is aluminum and so I'm not worried about corrosion, but it still seems somehow wrong to just ignore this. Maybe some helicopter tape? Although it seems like it would take a lot of time and effort? Or just not worry about it?

    What say you . . .
    Quote Originally Posted by rooze View Post
    That bothers me too. I wrapped my new bike frame in cling-film and scotch tape on the frame area where there's contact with bags. I did a blog post on the setup with a couple pics here Protecting Bike Frame for Bikepacking Duties?
    It works really well so far....
    Quote Originally Posted by Robopotomus View Post
    I use 3m heli tape where the bags rub on the frame.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_BC View Post
    I gave up after a while
    This? https://www.revelatedesigns.com/inde...FrameSaverTape
    I live in Indy and work with the coolest people in the world at TreeStuff.com

    Gotta have Bonnervision

  64. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbphilly View Post


    The camel on last week's bikepacking trip across the Galilee, northern Israel.

    It's a 2011 Pugsley with Titec J-bars (which I'm undecided on - I don't get much use out of the extra hand positions, and I don't like the handling), duct-tape-based ghetto tubeless setup, and five water bottles clamped to the frame. Weight of bike unloaded = effin' heavy. Weight of bike loaded = even worse.

    Tent, sleeping bag, and odds and ends in the handlebar roll. Food in the frame pack. Clothes and potset/stove in the saddlebag, and Thermarest rolled up on top of that. Overflow food capacity in a backpack, which I probably could have done without.

    The fat tires really weren't necessary at all on this ride; they were more suited to last month's ride in Jordan (Southern Jordan - Julian Bender - Travels and Photos). The worst conditions I encountered, tire width couldn't help with - sticky mud that clogged the drivetrain, making not only riding, but even walking impossible. Don't ride here after rain...

    Rest of the photos: Bikepacking the Galilee - Album on Imgur
    great trip and images. when i was young i spend some time in moshaw Sde Eli'ezer, just south of Kiryat Shmona, and than made my way all the way down to Eilat and bac k to Jerusalem to Tel Aviv and home. even though i got into some sketchy situations i had great time. i only had small backpack and slept on towel. not sure i could do it again.
    here is my fat setup, just about ready to roll from month ago.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-10866076_962076540480125_3285746358705730814_o.jpg  


  65. #165
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    Beautiful images of Israel, no idea it gets that green in the spring.

  66. #166
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    See my signature for way more examples. The mid-east is not all brown and dusty! Well, not all the time. Just for 6-8 months out of the year.
    www.julianbender.net

    Pictures of bike trips, hikes, and other travels

  67. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_BC View Post
    Here is my rig on the remote 2 week trip I did down Salsipuedes canyon in Mexico last month. When I started I had 40 litres of water! A Pugsley with Extrawheel trailer and Alpackaraft.

    Awesome set-up!

    Which size Alpackaraft did you use? How'd you like it? Any pics of it loaded with the bike and trailer?

    Sounds like a great trip!
    ISO: 22" GT Rebound frame, year 2000 model

  68. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by Medic Zero View Post
    Which size Alpackaraft did you use? How'd you like it? Any pics of it loaded with the bike and trailer?
    The Yak. I love my Alpackaraft. It is the only piece of equipment I have that I can't find any improvements I'd make, except for adding more grab attachment points but you can stick those on easily yourself.

    Here is a blog report I did for the trip with photos of the raft fully loaded. It's amazing how much stuff you can stuff inside the pontoons via the cargo fly option. I totally filled it up, I couldn't fit any more large items in it.

    I am hoping to go back and do some further exploration in that area with a new bike I am building.
    All I am saying is give pizza chants

  69. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_BC View Post
    The Yak. I love my Alpackaraft. It is the only piece of equipment I have that I can't find any improvements I'd make, except for adding more grab attachment points but you can stick those on easily yourself.

    Here is a blog report I did for the trip with photos of the raft fully loaded. It's amazing how much stuff you can stuff inside the pontoons via the cargo fly option. I totally filled it up, I couldn't fit any more large items in it.

    I am hoping to go back and do some further exploration in that area with a new bike I am building.
    Great write up! Thanks!
    ISO: 22" GT Rebound frame, year 2000 model

  70. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by SurlyBuckeye View Post
    The setup:
    Salsa Blackborrow DS
    Anything cages: tent on the left, sleeping pad on the right
    Sleeping bag off the handle bars
    Revelate Frame bag and Visacha seat bag for everything else
    I`m getting setup up for my first bikepacking trip with my fatbike. I was wondering how your bike handles with tent and sleeping pad hanging on fork versus having them off a rack in the back. I would worry the weight will throw off the handling being on the front versus the back. Does anyone have some experience to compare.

    Thanks

  71. #171
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    Where did you get your Extrawheel from for a Fattie? I had one for road touring which I sold, and would love to get another for my Salsa.
    Thanks, Derek

    2015 Salsa BearGrease Aluminum w/carbon fork

  72. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_BC View Post
    The Yak. I love my Alpackaraft. It is the only piece of equipment I have that I can't find any improvements I'd make, except for adding more grab attachment points but you can stick those on easily yourself.

    Here is a blog report I did for the trip with photos of the raft fully loaded. It's amazing how much stuff you can stuff inside the pontoons via the cargo fly option. I totally filled it up, I couldn't fit any more large items in it.

    I am hoping to go back and do some further exploration in that area with a new bike I am building.
    Thanks for the link to your epic blog post. That's the best thing I've read online in forever.
    Hope you get to do another trip like that and to share it...
    Just a fat old guy riding a fat old bike...
    Follow my antics at tent.bike

  73. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adventure Dan View Post
    I`m getting setup up for my first bikepacking trip with my fatbike. I was wondering how your bike handles with tent and sleeping pad hanging on fork versus having them off a rack in the back. I would worry the weight will throw off the handling being on the front versus the back. Does anyone have some experience to compare.

    Thanks
    I haven't finished building my fat bike, so I can't speak to that particularly. However, on. my Fargo, I don't mind it that much. If you get too much weight on the rear end, handling starts getting wonky. The biggest downside I have experienced with a front load is difficulty lofting the front wheel. You don't experience the same type of really bad handling with a bit of a front load as with getting rear heavy

  74. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by rooze View Post
    Thanks for the link to your epic blog post. That's the best thing I've read online in forever.
    Hope you get to do another trip like that and to share it...
    Thanks. I'm really trying to get the movie together but it is a lot of work! I think I'll do it in a few parts to keep people satisfied and craving more... I've been reviewing the footage and there's some good stuff there. Thinking back, it was a pretty amazing trip.
    All I am saying is give pizza chants

  75. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_BC View Post
    Here is my rig on the remote 2 week trip I did down Salsipuedes canyon in Mexico last month. When I started I had 40 litres of water! A Pugsley with Extrawheel trailer and Alpackaraft.

    Fantastic write up. I really enjoyed reading your article, and the pictures were great.

    CC

  76. #176
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    Travers Bat Fastard Travers Bikes.com - Travers Bikes
    Lauf Carbonara fork Lauf Carbonara | Lauf Forks - The Lauf Trail Racer - The lightest suspension fork on the market

    Ready to rumble for next weekends 4 day & 3 night Tour de Northumberland

  77. #177
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    I just bought a cheap fatbike (Gravity Bullseye - I have read the long thread for that bike already here on MTB'r)

    I'm a roadie by nature, quite casual at around 1800 miles/year, but I'd like to extend into the Michigan winter a bit this year, so I grabbed the aforementioned bike. I know it's not the best but not only did I not want to spend a lot of cash on a fat bike, but I also like the idea of not having to tear up so bad when I plow it through the snowbanks, leave it outside, or take an inevitable spill on ice.

    Anyways - I'm curious what all of the rack setups that people have. I will likely use this for some commuting this winter but would like the ability to also bikepack. I think a front & rear rack with panniers setup would be easiest for carrying a load that I can also easily remove and take into the office without looking like I'm going camping. I'd want to carry lunch, change of clothes, tools, emergency supplies, and on the nicer days possibly my laptop. Prefer to load the bike over my back.

    I really like a few setups here, but not many link directly to the parts they used.
    Cheap is good! I don't expect this to win any races.

  78. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildfire View Post
    Rear pack has internal stays which bolt to the frame's rack mounts to prevent swaying and mounts low enough to be able to swing your leg over it easily. No racks needed.
    What pack is that?

    edit: missed your earlier reply to the same question
    Last edited by BikesFloat; 10-26-2015 at 06:18 AM.

  79. #179
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    pugsleys

    DSC03976 copy by jan nikolajsen, on Flickr

  80. #180
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    How do you like the fork?
    Would you suggest it?
    Also, what is the largest rotor size it will mate with?

  81. #181
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    11ANTS ElephANT with Alpkit and Revelate bags in Sweden last summer

  82. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giel View Post


    11ANTS ElephANT with Alpkit and Revelate bags in Sweden last summer
    nice pic. Where in Sweden? i am looking at maps now trying to figure out if the Riksgransen area would be good for a fatbike trip in summer, or if it's too steep / too much pushing....

  83. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by alias View Post
    nice pic. Where in Sweden? i am looking at maps now trying to figure out if the Riksgransen area would be good for a fatbike trip in summer, or if it's too steep / too much pushing....
    This pic was taken last summer, just north of Hemavan if I remember correctly. I rode about 1800km off-road from the south of Sweden to Staloluokta. Was attempting the Grona Bandet, but ran out of time. I have looked at Riksgransen myself and rode the area south of it (Mavas to Staloluokta) which was doable, around 30% HAB). Bear in mind that Padjelanta National Park) is not open to bikes and they actually enforce this rule (I had to take a helicopter out from Staloluokta to Ritsem because of this). Last year I rode Abisko-Nikkoluokta, snow was piled up high on Tjaktja pass, around 15% HAB if you're a technically savvy rider, more if not. I'd say give Riksgransen a try and report back. Worst thing that can happen is that you hike a bit more than expected in a beautiful mountain scenery

  84. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerrduford View Post
    I just bought a cheap fatbike (Gravity Bullseye - I have read the long thread for that bike already here on MTB'r)

    I'm a roadie by nature, quite casual at around 1800 miles/year, but I'd like to extend into the Michigan winter a bit this year, so I grabbed the aforementioned bike. I know it's not the best but not only did I not want to spend a lot of cash on a fat bike, but I also like the idea of not having to tear up so bad when I plow it through the snowbanks, leave it outside, or take an inevitable spill on ice.

    Anyways - I'm curious what all of the rack setups that people have. I will likely use this for some commuting this winter but would like the ability to also bikepack. I think a front & rear rack with panniers setup would be easiest for carrying a load that I can also easily remove and take into the office without looking like I'm going camping. I'd want to carry lunch, change of clothes, tools, emergency supplies, and on the nicer days possibly my laptop. Prefer to load the bike over my back.

    I really like a few setups here, but not many link directly to the parts they used.
    Cheap is good! I don't expect this to win any races.

    Will a standard size rear rack fit on a fatbike?

    Maybe you've seen this thread already. Not too bad for a $30.00 rack.

    The biggest issue with trying to use a standard size rack on a fatbike will likely be the mounting to the seat stays. (Seat stays on fatbike are typically much wider, so rack may need to be mounted to the inside of the stays)

    I plan on doing a similar install on my Old Man Mountain Rack. OMM stuff isn't cheap, but I'm going that route simply because it's what I have in the garage.

  85. #185
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    Pugs and slick rock camping. Exploring the territory between the Maze and the Dirty Devil.

    Image 5-6-16 at 21.50 by jan nikolajsen, on Flickr

  86. #186
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    First trip Bikepacking went great, we set out on a 2.5 day 2 night 70 mile backcountry trip. Started out with mostly food and a few beers in the frame bag. Sleeping bag, maps ect on the bars. rain fly, hammock, down jacket, Pants, socks on the forks. Cookware, stove, water filter, rain jacket, leg warmers, more food, extra riding jersey in the seat bag. On the go food (tangerines, grapes, cliff bars) in the feed sack and top tube bag. All gear was on the bike no back pack. As the food disappeared the heavier items on the forks went in the frame bag.

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-bike-pack.jpg

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-12924320_1158515987500510_453370553702489245_n.jpg
    foggy on top of Mt.Rogers


    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-12512786_1158516027500506_336581452960993069_n.jpg
    no mountain house meals here, bacon and ribeyes


    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-10649477_1158515890833853_4207354261874702058_n.jpg
    there's def. a learning curve riding technical single track with 80lb bikes

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-1934645_1158516037500505_4694370571437469401_n.jpg
    already planning the next trip!

  87. #187
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    What did you use to carry water? I saw one bottle on the handlebar, was that it?

  88. #188
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    Nope had a 48oz nalgene on the bottom of the down tube and the 20oz on the bar stem.(the nalgene can be seen in the second pic) We'd hydrate up in the morning then fill the bottles for the days ride. With the cool weather it was plenty. I'd be hard to go thirsty here with a filter, there's creeks everywhere in this part of Virginia.

  89. #189
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    Fatness Is Happiness



    Ultralight bikepacking and gear lists... MaxTheCyclist.com

  90. #190
    Jammin' Econo
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    Do it however you want to do it. You don't owe anyone an explanation.

  91. #191
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    Here's my bike fully loaded for two nights and three days in Utah's West Desert. I'm hauling all my own water -- 14.5 liters! The frame bag, down tube bags, and handlebar bottle holders are dedicated entirely to carrying water. I'm not wearing a backpack.

    Yes, due to all the water, the bike is extremely heavy: 88 lbs. It is probably too heavy to ride any significant distance on technical or hilly terrain. But for flat, sandy trails it is just fine.

    Gotsta stay hydrated!


    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-20160508_155444.jpgPost your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-20160508_153700.jpg

  92. #192
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    my Ritchey Commando on a trestle of an abandoned railway near Anza Borrego State Park

    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-carrizorig.jpg

    mike

  93. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLC Tortfeasor View Post
    Here's my bike fully loaded for two nights and three days in Utah's West Desert. I'm hauling all my own water -- 14.5 liters! The frame bag, down tube bags, and handlebar bottle holders are dedicated entirely to carrying water. I'm not wearing a backpack.

    Yes, due to all the water, the bike is extremely heavy: 88 lbs. It is probably too heavy to ride any significant distance on technical or hilly terrain. But for flat, sandy trails it is just fine.

    Gotsta stay hydrated!


    Click image for larger version. 

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    Sick custom bags. Nick is an artist with a sewing machine.
    Ultralight bikepacking and gear lists... MaxTheCyclist.com

  94. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
    Sick custom bags. Nick is an artist with a sewing machine.
    Yep. Nick did a great job for me. I would recommend Rogue Panda to anyone!

  95. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by senor_mikey View Post
    my Ritchey Commando on a trestle of an abandoned railway near Anza Borrego State Park

    mike
    Sexy!

  96. #196
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    Bike set up for a few days on the Australian coast around Newcastle


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  97. #197
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    Here's my setup from a recent 7 day trip. Just waiting for a frame bag so I can run a 3L bladder and cookset in frame bag. Apart from that I'm pretty happy

    Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
    2010 Yeti ASR 7

  98. #198
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    Post your Fat-Bikepacking setup!-1049949d1455438654-today-wednesday-t1hbtlc.jpg

    nothing fancy

  99. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by iggs View Post


    Bike set up for a few days on the Australian coast around Newcastle


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Those bags are appropriate for a Moonlander!
    ISO: 22" GT Rebound frame, year 2000 model

  100. #200
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    My steely charge with 88l waterproof and 11l not so... bags&panniers

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