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  1. #1
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)

    Post your riding rig and gear layouts for all to enjoy!

    Descriptions of what you have got going (and how it works for you) are always a plus

  2. #2
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    Bikepackers might enjoy this (very extensive) bikepacking gear thread on a UK MTB forum:-

    Sick as a dog so, show me you Bivi / Bikepacking / Adventure racing gear..... « Singletrack Forum

  3. #3
    www.bigrobracing.co.uk
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    I use my normal Highball endurance race bike with a couple of the Revelate products and am extremely happy with the result:

    Bigger pictures and tales of my latest ride on my blog HERE. Pics below:




  4. #4
    Really I am that slow
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    my 2011

    divide setup..was to bad greyhound lost my bike for 5 days..... a few things well change for 2012 but the key bits of gear well remain the same...

    <iframe width="480" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/LvYfI1QPjGk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    Read my BLOG!

    just a guy who loves bikes and exploring

  5. #5
    A guy on a bike Moderator
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    It's getting a little dated, but here's my 2010 CTR gear list. I'll post an updated version when I get it all sorted out.

    Toby Gadd: Colorado Trail Race Gear (2010)

  6. #6
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    Here's a pic of my rig. Everything, but my sleeping bag, which is getting cut down into a quilt. A few things in the seat bag will go into a front handlebar harness along with the quilt. I'm able to carry 6 liters of water with this setup.

    Woody
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-miles_from_nowhere.jpg  


  7. #7
    Cumbria, England.
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    Here's a few pics from when I first built this bike up. I'll have to update them and provide my kit list when I get things packed up for my next trip!

    Tent, sleeping mat, sleeping bag and sleeping clothes are in the bar bag. Cooking gear, food and waterproofs go in the saddle bag. I have a couple of different sized Wingnut backpacks for carrying my normal biking gear plus snacks/energy products.

    Bags are by Bikepack and the cooking gear is by Evernew.





    Last edited by D45yth; 02-21-2012 at 10:52 AM.
    - The seasons blow away, but the love is just the same -

  8. #8
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    One of the coolest things about bikepacking is that you can do it nearly anywhere, on any bike, with any gear, anybody, and any speed.

    Got an old MTB, a rack, a sleeping bag, a backpack, and some rope? Go for it!

    Like ultralight gear, riding fast, and don't care if you have to rough it? Go for it!

    Want to take the kids on an adventure and bring some creature comforts in fully loaded panniers & a trailer? Go for it!

  9. #9
    I'm attracted to Gravity!
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    CT Lake City to Durango. All I needed beyond this was a smallish hydration pack.





    Woody, nice bags. Where can I get me some? ;-)

  10. #10
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    OMG these are awesome setups!!!!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MGoBlueMan View Post
    OMG these are awesome setups!!!!
    Agreed! I'm curious to see if any people have made functional bikepacking rigs with a full suspension 29'er??

  12. #12
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    Here's my lightweight setup. I make most of my gear and have been selling the saddlebags, framepacks, gas tanks, and carriers for a year and a half. They've been used in the GDR, Colorado Trail Race, Arrowhead 135, and by roadies for Brest/Paris/Brest.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-winter1.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-winter2.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-12-529.jpg  


  13. #13
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    Cool spokes, people!

    Here ya go, Nurburg:
    Pivot 429 because it does so many things well, and my low back does not. Set up here on the cheap for a 260-mile no-food-resupply stretch on a 600-mile ride. 33L Osprey pack not shown.




    Fandango Tourista, set up for two nights out. Frame packs will bring this up to full capability. 18L and 9L hydration packs not shown.



    Cheers,

    Mike

  14. #14
    gran jefe
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    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post
    Frame packs will bring this up to full capability. 18L and 9L hydration packs not shown.
    You have a hydration pack that holds 4.5 gallons of water? Loaded up, you carry 60 lbs of water? It is nice to have plenty...

    I'm going to end up with my sleeping pad on the front like that. Glad I'm not the only one...

  15. #15
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    Bill, that was misleading of me. "L" is the packs' capacity, not the bladder within. 18L hydration pack, LOL!

    For bigger rides we're going to have to use our front harness for a drybag and stick the pads out back somewhere. I dislike that homeless shopping cart look, but as long as it works...And nobody try to talk me into an inflatable pad

    Mike

  16. #16
    gran jefe
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    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post
    Bill, that was misleading of me. "L" is the packs' capacity, not the bladder within. 18L hydration pack, LOL!
    ha ha, I was pretty sure I was misunderstanding something. Then I thought, well, maybe they like to take showers on the trail...

    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post
    I dislike that homeless shopping cart look, but as long as it works...And nobody try to talk me into an inflatable pad
    Same here. When I'm backpacking, I have to hang the pad off the bottom of my pack, and I definitely look homeless. Oh well, it's comfortable, it never leaks, and it's mine. I might try to get fancy and put some kind of drawstring bag over it, but I sort of doubt it.

  17. #17
    3 Legged Big Top
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    Here's a pic of my Yeti BigTop setup.


    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-bikepacking-bikes-003-small-.jpg

  18. #18
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    Serotta 29er.
    Rohloff 50x20 Gates Belt Drive

  19. #19
    bicycleonthebrain
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    Last edited by vzman; 02-14-2012 at 12:43 AM. Reason: PIC

  20. #20
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    Try the paper clip icon if the pic is on your computer. The globe/link icon for a URL such photobucket or whatever host the pic resides with. They're above the posting text entry field.

    Whip it out, man.

  21. #21
    gran jefe
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    post the link and i'll do it for you.

  22. #22
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    Salsa Fargo by mbeganyi, on Flickr

  23. #23
    gran jefe
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    bmike, is that rear disc bigger than the front one? nice rig.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    bmike, is that rear disc bigger than the front one? nice rig.
    thanks.
    nope... 160s front and rear. just an odd angle.


    Salsa Fargo, bikepacking by mbeganyi, on Flickr

  25. #25
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    Re organizing Kit by mbeganyi, on Flickr

    click over to flickr to see notes on this. not the lightest setup.

    swapped to a tarptent contrail, still have an e-bivy and also a henessy hammock.
    love the contrail, need to use it on the bike next season...

  26. #26
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    cool stuff guys

    Keep posting your rigs and gear lists. I love it. This has been a long time dream of mine. One day....someday....somehow, I'll make the time to set up my kit and plan a multi-day trip someplace high and lonely.

    Keep it up & thanks

    Porch
    "If we were Vikings, Rocky Mountain aspen stands would be our Vahalla and its singletrack our bounty" - Mtn Flyer Mag #14

  27. #27
    gran jefe
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmike View Post
    click over to flickr to see notes on this. not the lightest setup.

    swapped to a tarptent contrail, still have an e-bivy and also a henessy hammock.
    love the contrail, need to use it on the bike next season...
    Okay, on the rotor sizes that makes sense. Later i'll click into Flickr to see the gear. For some reason they have it blocked here at work. I have used a hammock many times, but have never even seen a HH in real life.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    Okay, on the rotor sizes that makes sense. Later i'll click into Flickr to see the gear. For some reason they have it blocked here at work. I have used a hammock many times, but have never even seen a HH in real life.
    no pics of the hamock in there. just took the tarp and slept on the ground.

    here is what i'm using now...:


    IMAG4271 by mbeganyi, on Flickr

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by D45yth View Post
    Here's a few pics from when I first built this bike up. I'll have to update them and provide my kit list when I next get things packed up for my next trip!

    Tent, sleeping mat, sleeping bag and sleeping clothes are in the bar bag. Cooking gear, food and waterproofs go in the saddle bag. I have a couple of different sized Wingnut backpacks for carrying my normal biking gear plus snacks/energy products.

    Bags are by Bikepack and the cooking gear is by Evernew.





    D45yth, what handlebar is that?

  30. #30
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    So far, only one bike shown has a rack, and it's a tandem. Are racks not used at all for bike packing?

  31. #31
    A guy on a bike Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by alan ss View Post
    So far, only one bike shown has a rack, and it's a tandem. Are racks not used at all for bike packing?
    I raced the CTR in 2010 with a rack--and it worked great.

    But I've since gone rackless, using bags from Revelate, etc. I don't really bikepack unless I'm racing, so the weight of the rack was one issue. But the bigger one is that racks don't work very well on full-suspension bikes on technical trails. The weight is unsuspended, and the ride feels sloppy and unsteady.

    Here's blog post that I wrote a year ago about the pros and cons of racks:

    Toby Gadd: Panniers for 2011?

  32. #32
    Trail Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by alan ss View Post
    So far, only one bike shown has a rack, and it's a tandem. Are racks not used at all for bike packing?
    I use a rack, probably wouldn't if I weren't budget-minded, but I am, so I do.

    They work, but it is heavier.

  33. #33
    A guy on a bike Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuPrBuGmAn View Post
    They work, but it is heavier.
    But not by as much as they might initially seem. Maybe 2-3 pounds total, based on the calculations that I've done.

    Depending on the bike and terrain, I think that racks are a great option for bikepacking. Having used both systems, I can easily argue that racks are actually better in many aspects. Carrying the weight nice and low, and not having to wear a pack, are decent advantages. Further, panniers are very convenient--unlike rackless bags which are compressed and harder to pack and unpack.

    Even though I have a rackless system for ultra-racing (where comfort and convenience are secondary concerns), I am not about to put my my rack and panniers on eBay! On a hard-tail, they are pretty darn nice.

  34. #34
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    Nice rundown, Toby. Thanks for the link.

    We used racks with hardtail bikes for a 4-day jaunt around Santa Catalina Island. They worked fabulously. We already owned panniers and racks, so it was a minimal $ commitment. With a HT and graded fire road (read: minimal technical terrain), racks are of very little negative consequence IMO.

    The Old Man Mountain rack and Ortlieb panniers on our tandem are actually designed for the front. Both are much smaller and lighter than the rear-specific versions, and I further gutted all the extraneous features off the bags to lighten them up. A rack lets us lash bulky items out of the way and keep backpacks small. We decided on this direction in lieu of running a BOB Trailer on longer rides.

  35. #35
    gran jefe
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    My stuff ends up being pretty light, but pretty bulky. I am going to need to go with a rack just to have room.

  36. #36
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    A few of our rigs.
    Anthem X29er somewhere in the Sierras.
    Carbon Flash 29er in the middle of nowhere Arizona.
    Carbon Scalpel and the Flash in Utah somewhere. All great rigs and I would take any of them on a trip without hesitation.
    The "stuff" that spills out at the end of the day on a 3 day tour with my Wife.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-resize3.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-resize-2.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-resize-3.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-resize-4.jpg  


  37. #37
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    I've stood in the exact spot of your tent. Used to be my neck of the woods and I know it well

    How much of the Great Western Trail did you do?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Allan View Post
    A few of our rigs.
    Anthem X29er somewhere in the Sierras.
    Carbon Flash 29er in the middle of nowhere Arizona.
    Carbon Scalpel and the Flash in Utah somewhere. All great rigs and I would take any of them on a trip without hesitation.
    The "stuff" that spills out at the end of the day on a 3 day tour with my Wife.

  38. #38
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    What? Racks and panniers?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-026.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-011.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-029.jpg  


  39. #39
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    What is the disadvantage of the full suspension? It looks like most have hard tails.
    Bryce Jenkinson Photography
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  40. #40
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    For me, most bike packing tips include pavement, dirt roads, and a touch single track. So full suspension is a bit overkill. Plus you have to adjust the sag, extra moving parts, etc. On a hardtail, you can load it up. As much as I love singletrack, having 30-40 lbs sucks the fun out of it.

  41. #41
    A guy on a bike Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by brycej View Post
    What is the disadvantage of the full suspension? It looks like most have hard tails.
    Disadvantages of full-suspension:

    1. Extra stuff to break and maintain. Keeping pivots and shocks functioning properly takes time and money. Blowing a shock halfway to nowhere would be a drag.
    2. Extra weight. Full-suspension bikes are heavier than hard-tails.
    3. Poor climbing. Even a well-tuned full-suspension bike doesn't climb as well as a hard-tail (unless, of course, the trail is reasonably technical).
    4. Expensive. Full-suspension bikes are pricey compared to hard-tails.
    5. Possibly unnecessary. A lot of bikepackers are riding big wheels (29"), with low pressure, high volume, tires (2.4"+)--which provide a lot of "suspension."
    6. Racks don't work as well. While there are some racks that will work on full-suspension bikes, I think that they work better on hard-tails. Of course if you aren't using racks, then this is a non-issue.



    I ride a full-suspension bike though. For long days in the saddle on technical terrain, I find that I can go faster, fatigue less, and have more fun!
    Last edited by TobyGadd; 03-02-2012 at 02:22 PM.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by brycej View Post
    What is the disadvantage of the full suspension? It looks like most have hard tails.
    More weight
    More parts to malfunction
    Less room for frame bags
    Trickier or undesirable to use a rear rack

    I no longer own a HT, so that essentially decides what I use. My FS is a light, stiff 29er (Pivot 429), which makes a pretty good packingbike. Although the rear squish isn't de rigeuer, it's no serious detriment. I tie up the frame with elasticized cordage to give the shock a break, so I run the same pressure as I would unloaded. Prolly paranoia, but whatever.

    Mike

  43. #43
    A guy on a bike Moderator
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    Oops, wrong thread... Deleted,

  44. #44
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    Here are some. If there is one thing I love, it's lot's of pretty bikepacking pics. My favorite though is campsite pics. Always so much to look at besides some dirty old bike.


    more...buddy on the CT who was too tired to set up his tarp right. So funny...


    Finally, buddy sleeping under the stars (until rain at about 3 am).

  45. #45
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    Here is a bike packer that I ran into in the Himalayas:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dsc01182.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dsc01178.jpg  

    Last edited by tenletters; 03-02-2012 at 08:31 PM.

  46. #46
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    I ran into these guys twice and rode with them once for awhile.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dsc01348.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dsc01352.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dsc01354.jpg  


  47. #47
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    My rig last year...

    Here was my setup last Summer when I was loaded for a 5 day trip through the Eastern Sierras. This year I'll be on a new bike, and also be carrying about half the weight, as I've spent a lot of time and money this off-season on new gear... A nasty habit for sure!!!


    Frame bag: tools, tubes, pump, water filter, 3L bladder, shelter poles, some food.

    Seat Bag: Kelty Cosmic Down 20 degree bag, OR puffy jacket, extra socks, beanie.

    Handlebars: rolled up in harness: Golite Shangri La Shelter, Big Agnes Insulated Air Core pad, rain jacket. Extra Pocket Attached to Handlebar bag: Camera, maps, snacks, flashlight, chapstick, etc. Also had a Flyrod strapped to it for this trip.

    Gastank: snacks(2-3 Cliff bars or similar)

    Backpack: Here's a good picture of just what was on my back in the Osprey Talon 22...

  48. #48
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    This is the setup I used, plus the huge camelback hydration pack. Use what you have and go!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dsc01416.jpg  


  49. #49
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    These bikes are truly amazing! I would love to get into bike-packing, but the darn Olympic Peninsula is trumped by the OlyNat'l Park. I've been debating whether or not to sew up my own bags (i kinda suck at sewing) or researching bags used and purchasing. But, then again; I don't have anywhere to go....or do I? Any thoughts on bike-packing with a rigid SS?

  50. #50
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    Chomping at the bit. Spring is so close.


    Bedrock

  51. #51
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    Bikepacking Rig & Gear Layout

    My gear list changes a fair amount depending on the trip (weather, length, duration, etc.). These photos were from a HOT summer overnight trip here in South Carolina.

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-homesweethome.jpg
    Home Sweet Home - no longer use this tiny tarp

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-packed.jpg
    Here's my kit packed on the Black Sheep

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-layout.jpg
    Carrying a small tarp and bug bivy, a really light quilt, kitchen kit, and luxury pillow

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-journey-1.jpg
    It really isn't about the gear so much ...

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-journey-2.jpg
    ... or ultimately the actual destination ...

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-journey-3.jpg
    ... they're all just tools for the journey and that's where the fun is.

  52. #52
    Lighten up.
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    My 2011 ti' Speedway Fatback. All bags—except the front top tube bag (CDW)—are by Porcelain Rocket.



    More photos and specs here

  53. #53
    gran jefe
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    What an amazing collection of bikes...

    Quote Originally Posted by RJRiegler View Post
    I've been debating whether or not to sew up my own bags (i kinda suck at sewing) or researching bags used and purchasing.
    I have been thinking about that too. I think I will be fine with a couple of duffle bags, one bungeed to the front, the other one attached to a seatpost rack in the back. Might sew on some velcro straps for the front one, and maybe sew in a stiffening rod (prolly an aluminum arrow shaft). I'll take a little time to find the right bag if I don't have one already around the house.

    Quote Originally Posted by RJRiegler View Post
    But, then again; I don't have anywhere to go....or do I?
    Gotta be someplace to go, huh? Some forest service land where you can just jump on a dirt road and ride for a few hours, and then find a little spot to set up camp...

    Quote Originally Posted by RJRiegler View Post
    Any thoughts on bike-packing with a rigid SS?
    Saw pics of one around here somewhere, before the super cool ones posted last night.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by tenletters View Post
    Here is a bike packer that I ran into in the Himalayas:
    Hey Tenletters,
    Where were your pics taken?
    I did a 6 week trip through Tibet in 99.
    Been to Nepal biking a few times and Ladakh area in northern India.
    AWESOME places to see and great people.
    Great to see the photos.

    Woody

  55. #55
    Single Speed Junkie
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    Cold & windy

    Last night winds were up and the temp was not. After working outside on the vehicle last thing I wanted to do was try out the bar bag setup in the cold. Living room works though. Bar bag is a Medium CDW containing:
    - Big Agnes SL Seedhouse 1
    - Exped Sleeping Pad (long)
    - Western Mountaineering Highlight Sleeping Bag 6'6" size
    - REI bag liner

    Mounts up great to the bars and Faith Fork. Frame is pending along with custom bars.

    Frame mounted will be a Tenkara fly fishing rod all self contained in line with the down tube. Just finished rough cutting the mount this evening.

    Seat bag holds 3 days of food & cloths for decent weather.

    Pack holds all the normal bike support gear, first aid, rain gear and anything else needing quick access. For colder weather or longer trips I use a talon 22.

    Will post pics and more details when the frame is finished.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dscn1431.jpg  


  56. #56
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    Nice setup, Crux. Who made the bar bag?
    DM

  57. #57
    Single Speed Junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by donmeredith74 View Post
    Nice setup, Crux. Who made the bar bag?
    DM
    Thanks, I like the sheep. Bar bag was made by Carousel Design Works.

  58. #58
    fraid of heights
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    [QUOTE=tenletters;9060971]This is the setup I used, plus the huge camelback hydration pack. Use what you have and go![/QUOTE]

    great advice!
    Quote Originally Posted by the_owl
    Everytime you ride in mud, god kills a kitten.

  59. #59
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    Fatbikepackraftpacking.


    <a href="http://bedrockandparadox.com/2012/03/03/riding-like-an-animal/img_4804/" rel="attachment wp-att-5844"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-5844" title="IMG_4804" src="http://bedrockandparadox.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/img_4804.jpg" alt="" width="950" height="712" /></a>

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by ionsmuse View Post
    Fatbikepackraftpacking.


    <a href="http://bedrockandparadox.com/2012/03/03/riding-like-an-animal/img_4804/" rel="attachment wp-att-5844"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-5844" title="IMG_4804" src="http://bedrockandparadox.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/img_4804.jpg" alt="" width="950" height="712" /></a>
    Yeah yeah--but what seatpost is that?!

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Yeah yeah--but what seatpost is that?!
    And how much does it weigh?

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by tenletters View Post
    This is the setup I used, plus the huge camelback hydration pack. Use what you have and go!
    GF Hoo Koo E Koo? I have the same bike from the same year.

  63. #63
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    Quick question for you guys. Do the extended seat packs effect your riding on singletrack or steeper descents? I'm planning on doing the San Juan Hut to Hut and want to keep as much off my back as possible. A seatbag, bar bag and a regular camelbak should suffice, but I was thinking about the descent on the Whole Enchilada and the need to get of the back of the seat. Thoughts.

  64. #64
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    seems like the seat bags hold the weight a lot higher than a low rack would.

  65. #65
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    this thread is inspirational. were you guys backpackers before moving into bikepacking? i have no experience overnighting and have a learning curve to climb when it comes to food selection and prep. i have designs on taking up backpacking and it seems like the lessons learned would transfer quite nicely.
    In a world full of people, only some want to ride. Isn't that crazy?
    Seal/CRAZY/misquoted

  66. #66
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    I did a small amount of backpacking through the years but nothing epic. Mountain biking is my love along with camping so the two just came together very nicely for me.

  67. #67
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    In addition to the bike build and bike accessories, can we start seeing other gear listed in a format similar to what Toby Gadd did on his blog, which I listed below, slightly modified? I think it would be very useful for those of us who are passionate newbies to bikepacking such as myself.


    Clothing:

    Personal/toiletries:

    Navigation:

    Bike accessories/gear:

    Camping gear:

    Nutrition:

    First Aid:

    Repair gear:
    I make maps and seek out adventure using a Salsa El Mariachi with a 29+ front end. Read more here:

    RideAlongside

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerider2 View Post
    Do the extended seat packs effect your riding on singletrack or steeper descents? I'm planning on doing the San Juan Hut to Hut and want to keep as much off my back as possible. A seatbag, bar bag and a regular camelbak should suffice, but I was thinking about the descent on the Whole Enchilada and the need to get of the back of the seat. Thoughts.
    Hey br2, my short answer is no. But I'll qualify it by saying that I be sure my skills are honed enough that any technical terrain I'll be encountering bikepacking (read: seat not dropped, with seat pack and other gear) is way easier than my usual MTB fare. In short I think it's more about rider skill than a pack sticking out here or there.

    I actually prefer to take some weight off the bike and wear it on my back if it's tech riding. The weight on me is more "sprung" than the weight/mass on my bike, and I think it affects the handling less even though it is vertically higher. Smoother trails and road, I agree less on you = more enjoyment.

    Cheers,

    Mike

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevrider View Post
    this thread is inspirational. were you guys backpackers before moving into bikepacking? i have no experience overnighting and have a learning curve to climb when it comes to food selection and prep. i have designs on taking up backpacking and it seems like the lessons learned would transfer quite nicely.

    I'm a backpacker, trying to become a bikepacker. Think of how much you love riding a bike and then think about how you would like to walk the same trails that you could ride. A lot of the fun factor goes away... I just got from a trip to Torres Del Paine where I did a guided mountain trip and then backpacked for 6 days. We only wish we could have been riding all the same trails we hiked.

    So when you look at gear for backpacking and bikepacking look at 2 things, weight and volume. I've always tried to keep the volume down so I could fit it on a bike if I had to. You may have to buy and try different gear to see what works for you. I use bivy sacks for most of my backpacking, but some people feel claustrophobic and prefer tents, or tarps. Some people are going with really light torso only thin foam pads, I prefer the inflating air mattress, small and pretty light. Spend the money on a good, lightweight bag that will fill your realistic temp ranges. I've got a huge 3 lb 10 degree bag and then a light 1lb 32 degree bag. Which one do you think I use most when I'm doing only 3 season camping?
    Look at Andrew Skurka's book The Ultimate Hiker's gear guide. It will help you assess, whether you are camper or hiker. So are you about comfort while move, which equates to light packs or comfort while in camp or somewhere in between.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by forgiven_nick View Post
    In addition to the bike build and bike accessories, can we start seeing other gear listed in a format similar to what Toby Gadd did on his blog, which I listed below, slightly modified? I think it would be very useful for those of us who are passionate newbies to bikepacking such as myself.


    Clothing:

    Personal/toiletries:

    Navigation:

    Bike accessories/gear:

    Camping gear:

    Nutrition:

    First Aid:

    Repair gear:
    As posted on bikepacking.net, updates in blue:

    Set-Up:

    OMM Cold Springs Rack

    Jannd Mountain Panniers

    Small dry bag.

    Gear in bags (approximate):

    Cheap old 1″ Thermarest this will be my first upgrade for next trip- something smaller/lighter.ProLite 4 now

    Western Mountaineering Highlite

    1 midweight wool top

    1 silkweight tights

    Campor zip-off pants/shorts I liked this luxury item.

    1 extra pair of socks

    1 extra bike shorts

    1 extra lightweight top

    I’d live without these extras in a “race” but not a tour

    1 novel, traded out when going through towns again, would leave at home in a race or not solo for 16 days

    Alcholol stove and alchohol

    small ti kettle

    MSR coffeemate could have left this at home, but it was nice

    coffee

    small pirce of pack towel- about the size of dish cloth

    toiletries -TP, Bronner’s, Tooth stuff, Contact lens stuff

    Very minimal First aide- gauze, duct tape, Superglue, Benadryl, Aleve

    Chaco’s - defintely could have left these at home, but I loved having them every day.

    MSR Hiker filter

    Food- up to 5 days worth, I promised my wife I’d always have 36 hours extra food just in case…

    A few other small misc items…

    Handlebar bag is an ANCIENT Trek bag I’ve had since I was 16 (36 nowmake that 40). Holds- Compass, map, hammock, rain fly. Hammock is Claytor Expedition, the best gear ever!

    WIngnut pack on back- holds Sierra Designs jacket, food for the day and standard riding stuff, plus bladder. I don’t like carrying the weight on my back. This pack was never “stuffed”- and my back never hurt.

    I am aware my set-up is “bigger” than most, but it worked great. I’ve noted what I’d get rid of if racing or with others. My only problem is when I’ve had to shoulder the bike across some serious water crossings, that’s a pain in the arse. Otherwise, descends awesome, handles great.

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  72. #72
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    thanks for the feedback, guys. i some of the items required for camping; a couple of sleeping bags, tents, hammock.... but i most often arrive at a campsite by motorcycle after having filled my gullet on the road. so food and cargo carrying will be the main issues, as well as downsizing from an already light load. it should be a fun process, hopefully without too many disasters. i've spotted that Skurka book on amazon, looks interesting, thanks for the lead.
    In a world full of people, only some want to ride. Isn't that crazy?
    Seal/CRAZY/misquoted

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerider2 View Post
    Quick question for you guys. Do the extended seat packs effect your riding on singletrack or steeper descents? I'm planning on doing the San Juan Hut to Hut and want to keep as much off my back as possible. A seatbag, bar bag and a regular camelbak should suffice, but I was thinking about the descent on the Whole Enchilada and the need to get of the back of the seat. Thoughts.

    Carry a ~25 liter pack. Run the pack mostly empty on dirt road stuff, then empty the seatpack into the backpack for tech descents.

  74. #74
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    It really isn't about the gear so much ...

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    It's gotta be about the gear a little though, right?


    Nice ride!
    It's all about the firecuts

  75. #75
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    shakedown run
    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dscn0744.jpg
    was gonna do a two night and two dayer, but was chased out of the woods by wildfires.
    them things move faster than i dont know what
    It's all about the firecuts

  76. #76
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    double post
    It's all about the firecuts

  77. #77
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    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/67338272@N05/7070528343/" title="IMAG1759 by james-o, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7090/7070528343_ce2bb01c90.jpg" width="500" height="299" alt="IMAG1759"></a>

    Jones diamond steel - utterly brilliant to ride loaded up, I love this bike... got 2 longer trips booked for this summer.
    Cleveland seatpack (thanks JC, it's doing a grand job)
    Old snowbike framepack borrowed from a friend who raced Arrowhead
    Homemade barstrap and 10l drybag
    Ebay cheapy gastank, modified at home (not great, a bit more modification needed)
    10l Osprey backpack with a few bits, a book and a hipflask etc.
    1.5l bottle on the downtube with toestrap support
    ~15lbs of bags and kit not inc food/water, enough for spring weekenders.

  78. #78
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    No BOB trailers?

    First post! (no pics yet)

    My brothers and I do an annual trip into the back country for 3-4 days at a time at one of the National Parks here in Canada. Trails we ride are a mix of fireroad, and single track, moderately technical in parts.

    Have tried various bags and racks on our trips but our favorites are the BOB trailers. Low center of gravity has minimal effect on the handling of the bike, follows the track of the bike really well, will even follow well over logs upto 6" high.

    Camping gear is a collection from our days working for a local outdoor retailer, most is backpacking gear. BOB made it an easy transition, load your duffle similar to your pack, load and go!

  79. #79
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    Just biding my time now. I'll be adding two anything cages to the forks, a bar bag, gas tank, and also have a Talon 22. Should have more then enough space for gear, water, and food but I'm a little worried about the seat bag swinging. I'll have to do a shakedown and have a plan if it becomes a problem.

  80. #80
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    Lots of cool stuff

  81. #81
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    After all those lovely clean bikes, being ridden in warm dusty climes, I thought I'd share my trusty bikepacking set up as it looked after three days of riding around Wales last year.

    The layer of filth is mostly sheep **** mixed with water and sprayed all over everything, including the water bottle...

    Bar harness is from Wildcat Gear holding a 20ltr dry bag containing sleeping bag, bivvy bag and sleeping mat. On the rack is another 20ltr dry bag containing spare clothes, food and stove. Golite rush carries one bottle and waterproof and camera.


    P1070394 by nickgilling, on Flickr

    This bike has been retired to "messing about in the woods" duty, a Fargo has replaced it for bikepacking duties but not as yet had a chance to get out there.

  82. #82
    gran jefe
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    Nick, what is the width of the frame bag that you show in your blog? Does the crank brush it at all? The question came up a week or so ago. I think you say it's 75mm.

  83. #83
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    Hi Bill, yes it's 75mm wide, which is the same size as a water bottle - even with a bit of bulge there's still plenty of room - about 140mm between the insides of the crank arms.

    Cheers

    Nick

  84. #84
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    Cool, thank you for that information.

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    These are awesome setups, too bad a poor college kid's budget doesn't let me do fun stuff like this!

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by oakleviathan View Post
    These are awesome setups, too bad a poor college kid's budget doesn't let me do fun stuff like this!
    I started in college with a backpack and a tent strapped to my seat. Budget should never be in the way of a good time.

  87. #87
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    agreed!! your bike's bling is just a factor of income.

    strap eveyrthing you need to your bike, bash it off some curbs, down some grassy hills, ask yourself what's working and what's not, readjust, and there you go.
    your rig will evolve as your riding does.
    but the trip is the goal, the bike is just a tool.

    except for a good strong rack to carry a mini-keg, that's essential and you must splurge on that.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by oakleviathan View Post
    These are awesome setups, too bad a poor college kid's budget doesn't let me do fun stuff like this!
    Is there a thread on budget bike-packing?

    If not, there should be.

    What's the minimum gear you need?

    A tent, or some sort of tarp at least, a ground roll of sorts, a sleeping bag/blanket if weather demands. Also water and food.

    Then access to a trail long enough to ride until you need to sleep, then ride again some more.
    Be respectful to the disrespectful, wise to the unwise, caring to the uncaring, courteous to the uncourteous.
    My Riding Blog

  89. #89
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    big_papa_nuts,

    what kind of dry bag are you using for your rear seat bag? I like!

    Thanks!

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by VO2 Lax View Post
    big_papa_nuts,

    what kind of dry bag are you using for your rear seat bag? I like!

    Thanks!
    Sea to Summit Big River Dry Bag - 20 Liters at REI.com and some 40 inch REI 3/4 inch Webbing Straps with Side-Release Buckle at REI.com. That's some budgetpacking for ya.

  91. #91
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    That's awesome! Thanks for the tip! Brilliant for the budget rider!

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by oakleviathan View Post
    These are awesome setups, too bad a poor college kid's budget doesn't let me do fun stuff like this!
    I'm not in college anymore, but I'm still on a college budget.

    None of my stuff is the lightweight, super awesome packsized kinda stuff. I did purchase a $35 seatpost rack. I've got a walmart sleeping bag thats years and years old, got a $40 pup tent from Bass Pro Shop, and my fiance made my frame bag.

    From this past weekends 131 mile trip across Florida's largest park, Apalachicola National Forest.



    Do NOT let your budget keep you from having fun on a bike. If you already have a bike, the expensive part is over!

  93. #93
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    SuPrBuGmAn lovely trail and attitude
    Do you have more pics?

  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dusza View Post
    SuPrBuGmAn lovely trail and attitude
    Do you have more pics?
    Yes!

    Hoping to get a trip report finished up tonight

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by RenoRacing View Post
    Very similar to my set-up, what gearing are you running? I currently use 34 x 21. ...and is that a fishing rod holder on the front rack??

    Last edited by bdstorer; 05-12-2012 at 08:27 PM.
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  96. #96
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    I'm want to start planning a bikepacking trip for this fall, it's something I've always wanted to do. I'd love to take a small trip to get my feet wet and see how I do!

  97. #97
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    Piece of cake, sasq. There will always be something to refine, so you may as well enjoy whatever inefficiencies ya end up with. Stay psyched!


    Doo-hood...one of our new tandem frame bags fits my FS single bike...but let me back up:



    Porcelain Rocket does great work! Quick fit check in the photo; we'll run with small "front" panniers and rack on the back and harness/pocket on the bars similar to this (sleep pads will prolly go out back on the rack). I'd say we have capacity now:





    Gonna be a great summer...

    Mike

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    Quote Originally Posted by lobstermike
    Hi Nick, fellow u.k'er here. I have one of those wildcat handlebar harnesses on order. How did you find it in use? I'll be using it, hopefully, with a 10 litre drybag. Yours is the first example i have seen set up on a standard mtb riser bar. Was there any issues with the harness straps sliding down into the lower part of the handlebar? And how did you deal with placement of your brake and gear cables? Was there any problems with running your cables behind the bar bag?

    Would appreciate any advice, thanks.
    Mike
    Hi Mike, sorry but I've not posted enough times to allow me to reply to your pm. But in response to your questions about the wildcat handlebar harness see my response below.

    For others who haven't come across this harness it's a clever design which rather than just hanging your bag below the bars, creates a pretty solid frame by tensioning some straps between your bars and the fork crown, against which the harness and your dry bag is supported.

    This makes it really stable in use and holds the bag away from your headtube, front tyre and to a certain extent the cables.

    The straps sit inside the rise on my handle bars and don't move about at all.

    I found that that although it did push the cables back a bit it didn't make any difference to the shifting or braking, or put too much strain on them, I've done half a dozen over nights and multi day trips with it.

    It's a bit fiddly the first time you use it and you might scratch your head a bit as you work out how to best attach it, but I can now quickly put it on without the instructions, it's worth taking some time at first to find the best placing (vertically) for the harness as this can make a difference to the stability.

    I used a 20ltr dry bag, weight over 2kg, and it's been fine.

    I would consider putting helicopter or even electrical tape around the bars and maybe the fork crown as the straps will mark them otherwise, especially if it's wet and mucky out there!

  99. #99
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    Thanks for the info Nick. I'm looking forward to getting to grips with the harness and bag set up. My main concern was the cables, but as you say the harness manages to stop the bag from sitting too close to the head-tube, and in that case should be ok. Thanks again Nick.

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    New Setup...

    Here's the first "mock loading" of the new bike... Just finished the frame bag a couple days ago. This is loaded with pretty much every bag(minus small top tube feed bag) that I could ever need. Most trips won't see this much gear, but love the capability to load over 35 liters of gear onto the bike! I'll be packing up for a trip next weekend, and will update my gear layout and details about what is where on the bike when I finalize it all...



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