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  1. #401
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    The Sweet Roll looks neater for flat bars, but there's no way it's going to work with drop bars, i.e. on a Fargo, so the Harness is still useful.

  2. #402
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    Re: Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)

    The harness and a pocket for cell phone and misc stuff looks perfect. Any other good manufacturers to consider?

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I727 using Tapatalk 2
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  4. #404
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    El Mariachi with a Fargo fork, upside down Mary bars. Fun Fun Fun.
    Tent, sleeping bag and stove up front. Food in the frame bag and all sorts of clothing in the seat bag.

    No back pack needed with this set up.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-el-mariachi-bikepacking.jpg  


  5. #405
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    New Frame Bag

    This is my new frame bag. Made to fit my 2007 Giant XTC C1 by Bike Bag Dude. Very nice fit, 2 zips, waterproof.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-image.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-image.jpg  


  6. #406
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    Quote Originally Posted by satanas View Post
    The Sweet Roll looks neater for flat bars, but there's no way it's going to work with drop bars, i.e. on a Fargo, so the Harness is still useful.
    Works fine on my Fargo with drop bars.

  7. #407
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    ^ Okay, how? From the pix on Revelate's website it appears to me that the Sweet Roll is just too wide to fit into the space available. However, I'm interested in being able to carry stuff on normal width road bike bars, and my Fargo has 42 cm Woodchippers, not 46 cm. Also, I'm not prepared to have my hands rubbing against the bag.

  8. #408
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    Quote Originally Posted by satanas View Post
    ^ Okay, how? From the pix on Revelate's website it appears to me that the Sweet Roll is just too wide to fit into the space available.
    Just roll up the ends until you have clearance. I'm able to fit my sleeping gear (tent, poles/stakes, sleeping bag) without the ends mashing against the bars and I have just enough clearance for my hands.

  9. #409
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    Aha! Now I understand - the pix show the bags at what is probably full width on flat bars and there's no way something that wide would work for me on the drop bars. (I wonder if my order has shipped yet? Maybe I can switch if not.)

  10. #410
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    Krampus set up for S24O

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    Sleeping bag, down jacket and air pillow in the Wildcat seatpack, air mat and bivvy bag in the Wildcat front harness, food, stove, bike spares etc kindle in the Revelate frame bag.

    I used a wingnut to carry water and spare clothing/wet stuff

    More info here

    Confused ?

    More pics here

    S24O - a set on Flickr

  11. #411
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    Nice pix! I haven't been to Anglesey since I collected a frame from Tony Oliver in Rhosybol in 1982. It's hard to ride there from Sydney...

    BTW, what cranks and cassette are you using and does the chain rub against the tyre in any gears? Thanks!

  12. #412
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    I'm hoping to move to Anglesey permantly in a few years time when the last of the cuckoo's has finally flown the nest :-)

    Straight through XT 2x10 set up, no rubs, documented with pics on the Krampus thread

  13. #413
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    Thanks; I must have missed it. (I thought Surly were saying 2x10 was going to rub.)

    Hopefully will get to the UK in 2015, not sure where yet.

  14. #414
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    Did my first bikepacking overnighter with my son over the weekend. 10 miles on trails the first day to "boat in" campground, then 30+ miles the next day to get back home on mostly paved roads. The Surly Cross Check did awesome, and was surprisingly well behaved loaded pretty tail heavy. I added some bungee cords around the panniers to quiet them down, but other than that it was a great setup. It would be great to add a front harness and a top pocket for the sleeping bag, ground cover, maps, cell phone, etc.


    Surly Cross Check 52cm
    Ultegra shifters/derailleurs w/ road triple crank
    Shorty 6 Cantis
    Continental 700x35c Cyclocross Speed tires (GREAT multipurpose tire)
    Cheap a$$ rack and panniers (mostly for commuting, and would want something stronger for long trips)



    I packed pretty light for this trip, and opted to sleep under the stars rather than bring a tent. It was no less than 55F overnight, and the bugs weren't bad. The heaviest items were food, sleeping bag and the water filter. I don't think my whole setup weighed more than 45#, using the ultra-accurate heft with one arm method.
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  15. #415
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoHeadsBrewing View Post
    Did my first bikepacking overnighter with my son over the weekend. 10 miles on trails the first day to "boat in" campground, then 30+ miles the next day to get back home on mostly paved roads. The Surly Cross Check did awesome, and was surprisingly well behaved loaded pretty tail heavy. I added some bungee cords around the panniers to quiet them down, but other than that it was a great setup. It would be great to add a front harness and a top pocket for the sleeping bag, ground cover, maps, cell phone, etc.


    Surly Cross Check 52cm
    Ultegra shifters/derailleurs w/ road triple crank
    Shorty 6 Cantis
    Continental 700x35c Cyclocross Speed tires (GREAT multipurpose tire)
    Cheap a$$ rack and panniers (mostly for commuting, and would want something stronger for long trips)



    I packed pretty light for this trip, and opted to sleep under the stars rather than bring a tent. It was no less than 55F overnight, and the bugs weren't bad. The heaviest items were food, sleeping bag and the water filter. I don't think my whole setup weighed more than 45#, using the ultra-accurate heft with one arm method.
    I thought about going to that same boat-in spot for my first s24s but ended up going to Little Grass . Sounds like a good trip ,thanks for sharing......Mike

  16. #416
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    '99 Jamis Dakota frame with an Xtracycle kit. This was last weekend camping with my wife and some friends, me carrying all the gear for my wife and I.

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-xc_grb_rest.jpg

    The suspension fork I have on there doesn't work well, it just isn't heavy duty enough to accommodate the long frame. It flexes a lot more than I'm comfortable with, so I ordered a surly big dummy fork this morning.

  17. #417
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    Your my hero man still trying to get my wife out there.
    Quote Originally Posted by SweetSVT99 View Post
    '99 Jamis Dakota frame with an Xtracycle kit. This was last weekend camping with my wife and some friends, me carrying all the gear for my wife and I.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The suspension fork I have on there doesn't work well, it just isn't heavy duty enough to accommodate the long frame. It flexes a lot more than I'm comfortable with, so I ordered a surly big dummy fork this morning.

  18. #418
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unchewable View Post
    Your my hero man still trying to get my wife out there.
    It was a pretty easy sell really. She likes riding and camping, I just had to commit myself to carrying basically double the gear. She likes that all the weight slows me down to her pace too.

  19. #419
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    The week before the tour divide I rode the route to elkford and then returned via some amazing singletrack. An awesome and ridiculously beautiful 6 day, 6 night trip.

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    my sleep setup. I love the hammock. It's about 40F and drizzling. The sleeping bag is airing out before I pack it up and head off. Having the bike under the tarp is a great way to keep the parts happy.

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dscn4950.jpg
    kananaskis lake. The small revelate designs tangle bag just barely holds a nearly full 100oz camelback bladder. Nice to have it off my back. Pika seat bag was perfect for a small krampus with lots of seatpost exposed. I had tried the vascacha on a test trip and it was tough keeping it off the tire.

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    the outdoor research 25L lateral bag was great, but required some muscle and extra webbing to keep it off the tire. It held my bulky 20F synthetic bag and air mattress.

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    krampus did not like this muck! momentum carried me in and it was tough to get out without filling my shoes with it.

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    krampus did not do well in the melting snow. I could sort of stay in control on mild descents. fortunately there wasn't much snow to cross.

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dscn5054.jpg
    Elbow Lake, quite possibly the most beautiful place in the world.

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    I pretty much stayed awake most of the night hanging on to my tarp (literally much of the time) in case this nasty storm pulled my tarp stakes out of the ground.
    Last edited by PretendGentleman; 06-24-2013 at 02:15 PM.

  20. #420
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    my revised set up; going lighter and using a different bicycle for now;

    Using all USGI MOLLE/ALICE equipment;
    front bag holds my sleeping bag; and tarp/ground cover with poles and long boot laces for guy lines; first aid kit is attached to side of bag, and a 1qt canteen pouch with my canteen, fire starting kit, Sterno burner, canteen stove, and gloves;


    bag behind bars holds spare tire tubes, small tool kit, leatherman multi-tool, and washcloth; then I have two canteens on the frame (each holds 2 quarts),


    the side bags in rear holds clothes, fleece sweater, light rain jacket, while green large pouches on the rearmost holds food and cooking utensils, and the bag on the top holds my 10x9 BQ grill with a plastic bag holding some charcoal briquettes for cooking; its a little heavier than some of you guys' set ups, but it works great for me




    the whole set up assembled; I am thinking either I get rid of the ground cover; and poles, or I get a front rack to help support the front bag;

  21. #421
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    Pics from a few recent trips, including one with my 12 year old son. He had a great time!

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-bikes.jpg

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_0817.jpg

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_0842.jpg

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-milo-big-tank.jpg

  22. #422
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    Quote Originally Posted by CamoDeafie View Post
    my revised set up; going lighter and using a different bicycle for now;

    Using all USGI MOLLE/ALICE equipment;
    front bag holds my sleeping bag; and tarp/ground cover with poles and long boot laces for guy lines; first aid kit is attached to side of bag, and a 1qt canteen pouch with my canteen, fire starting kit, Sterno burner, canteen stove, and gloves;


    bag behind bars holds spare tire tubes, small tool kit, leatherman multi-tool, and washcloth; then I have two canteens on the frame (each holds 2 quarts),


    the side bags in rear holds clothes, fleece sweater, light rain jacket, while green large pouches on the rearmost holds food and cooking utensils, and the bag on the top holds my 10x9 BQ grill with a plastic bag holding some charcoal briquettes for cooking; its a little heavier than some of you guys' set ups, but it works great for me




    the whole set up assembled; I am thinking either I get rid of the ground cover; and poles, or I get a front rack to help support the front bag;
    Wow, that's a lot of bags. I tried to strap my Teton tent to my H-Bars, but I couldn't get it to not interfere with my dual control levers. That tent is like 4 or 5 pounds and makes a 2' long tube when rolled up. I keep thinking maybe I should get a more compact tent or bivy, but I'm not sure I want to spend real money on this project until I do a few trips and figure out what works and what doesn't.

    You did a nice job of getting a lot of bags up front.

  23. #423
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    Wow, that's a lot of bags. I tried to strap my Teton tent to my H-Bars, but I couldn't get it to not interfere with my dual control levers. That tent is like 4 or 5 pounds and makes a 2' long tube when rolled up. I keep thinking maybe I should get a more compact tent or bivy, but I'm not sure I want to spend real money on this project until I do a few trips and figure out what works and what doesn't.

    You did a nice job of getting a lot of bags up front.
    I decided to revise my set up once again; simplifying and reducing size of bags down; and reducing weight more..this is a 2-3, maybe 4 days set up if I can get enough food to fit in the panniers; or into the various small pouches;
    this time though; I ditched the tarp, the heavy ground cover (was a double layer poncho I made 15 years ago), the extra red blanket...and took out my Stansports Scout A-Frame backpackers tent; Stansport Scout 2 Person Nylon Tent; then folded it in half, put my blue sleep pad in there, and my sleeping bag in there.. then rolled it up, and used an USGI M1967 sleep roll carrier to hold it all in; without the poles and stakes/rope/rubber mallet, it weights just shy of 5 pounds. the poles/stakes/rope/rubber mallet, all are in one pannier with the food and bbq grill , the small pouches up front holds my first aid kit in one pouch, rain jacket in another, canteen cup and sterno burners/fire starting kit in a canteen pouch, and small foods. socks in the other canteen pouch; the handlebar brick bag holds my tools, spare tube, phone, small camera, washcloth, and cable lock, the other pannier bag holds my clothing; and on top of the rear rack I have a Spec Ops hydration bladder that holds my two 2-qt canteens.
    front; I realize it looks way huge and bulky... but its not wider than my handlebars; despite the perspective lol

    small pouches attached to front rack, canteen pouches in front positions, USGI USMC First Aid Kit pouches in back positions; yes the rain jacket packed that small.

    the back; showing the hydration pouch holding the canteens and the side pannier bags.

    overall shot; if the area I'm camping in, has enough trees close together, I could leave the poles behind... I am seriously considering getting a pair of graphite or similar tent poles and modifying them to fit the height of the A-frame tent and thus be much lighter than the aluminum pole sections; and pack smaller/slimmer; or be attached to the top tube via straps....not sure yet. the heaviest single items are the canteens with 2 qts each....and then the rubber mallet for driving the stakes down in hard dirt.

  24. #424
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    Camodeafie ó I get the impression that half the fun for you is in the preparation! Which is the case for many people. I'm glad to see you paring down your load. If you haven't already gone on an outing, I would strongly encourage you to try the overnight/S24O idea. I'm guessing you will find that your perspective changes radically when you are actually on the bike and mashing up hills, etc. I know mine did. Suddenly all my "be prepared for anything" approach was replaced with a determination to streamline my entire setup dramatically. We all do this a little differently, but I think you might find the road is the best way to decide what to keep and what to jettison. Good luck!

  25. #425
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    Owlish, thanks! I'm trying to find information on Bowers Rock State Park; whether it is possible to get there overland...as it is very close but officially it's not vehicle accessible; however, can be walked in..... or boated in. (it's on the river) a Pity I don't have a raft hahaha
    EDIT:: Bowers Rock State Park is Boat Access ONLY; (no recognized legal overland access; all overland access points are private property) And NO camping allowed. So essentially; it is a day use park for boaters and residents of the properties around it this is according to the email I got from Oregon State Parks and Recreation.
    Last edited by CamoDeafie; 07-30-2013 at 03:47 PM.

  26. #426
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    Great setups. Next year I'm looking at doing a big bike tour and these have given me some great ideas for how to craft my packs.
    Adventure Strong | Hiking, Mountain Biking, and Adventure Travel
    http://www.adventurestrong.com

  27. #427
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-9441744825_74541250ef_o.jpg
    Hi folks, I am new to bikepacking, and this is the rig that plan on taking on S24O trips outside Montreal later this month.

    The bike is a 23" 2011 Trek Marlin 29er, mostly stock, used for bad-weather and daily winter commuting since new. The generic Nashbar rigid fork pictured replaced a cheap Suntour suspension unit that seized after 2 winters without any maintenance.

    I plan on attaching a modified medium-sized backpack between the front rack and the handlebars (a commuting setup that has worked exceptionally well for me so far). The rear rack will receive a trunk bag. I am thinking this will be enough storage space to fit a Hennessy Hammock, sleeping bag, Trangia stove and one day's worth of food.

    Any feedback/suggestions will be much appreciated. I'll post a pic of the bike loaded at some point next weekend.

  28. #428
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    I'd try to keep the front end load light, and any weight carried there down as low as possible and close to the head tube, otherwise steering on slow off-road climbs is going to get really heavy. There'll be a lot more shock-loading on the front rack off-road than commuting too, and of it's alu I wouldn't be too surprised if it broke at the welds sooner rather than later...

  29. #429
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    ^ point well taken. The front pack will mostly contain the sleeping bag, hammock and clothes, which should bring it to around 10 lbs. The backpack is very close to the head tube and is partly (~30%) suspended from the handlebars. I will try this out on tame dirt roads, but the longer-term vision is to likely move toward a rack-less setup.

  30. #430
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    It's amazing how little one needs to survive overnight in good weather. Years ago a friend and I did a couple of Polaris Challenges here in Oz, and some people managed to fit all the required gear into a rackpack, nothing else. I'm not saying this was a comfortable option (at night), but goes to show that one can get away with less than might be suspected. If going out for multiple nights, wanting to be comfortable in foul weather and carrying food, more carrying capacity will be needed(!), but I reckon you ought to be able to survive for a few days on a rackpack (~10-15 litres) plus a small rucksack (~20 litres or so).

    If you really want to push things, here's one way: Ultralight bicycle touring

    Best of luck and have fun!

  31. #431
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-548306_10151626707504398_578065630_n.jpg

    2009 Kona Jake. Two large Nashbar panniers and I was able to fit all of my camping gear for my ride in Denali. Also doubles as my daily commuter

  32. #432
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    Very cool, Falconpunch! Aftetr this pic, I went "spying" on you and found the trip repot:
    Bikepacking Denali
    Hope you don`t mind.
    Recalculating....

  33. #433
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    I have most of what I need for a budget 26-inch build intended for mountain touring on mainly ST, some road. Have a Nashbar HT alu frame, RS Dart 3 fork, X9 twist-shifters, FSA Hammer headset, LX FD, Deore 3x9 octalink crank, X9 RD. Brakes, I intend to run a Formula RX front on a 203 disc, rear 203 also, Hayes mechanical. I don't have wheels yet, thinking 36-hole 6-bolt mount usual 100/135mm with rim track if I decide to use or later put on a front v-brake for backup (can you tell I have had a hydraulic disc failure b4?). Low-tech shock post, surly constrictor clamp.

    Using Nashbar slim panniers on rear, plan to be travelling with minimal equip. in fair weather, maybe Kokopelli or Calif. deserts/mtns. I already have a quick carbon-frame FS XC bike, but I don't want on-trail repair hassles or bobbing suspension with loaded panniers, or have to rely on lockouts.

    The idea for this low-buck generic build is bomb-proof reliability, nothing exotic, cheap/possible to fix in nowheresville, and brakes that will never ever die. Except for the frame, I picked up most of the components from bike swaps and local ads. Decent reliable used wheels are not common here for some reason.

    Questions:

    Can I get by with hayes or shimano 203 caliper to post adapter (clearance) with a formula caliper?

    Any advantage to using a wider rim with tires like the wtb weirwolfs I already have. Example: Sun makes downhill rims that are abt 1.5 in.?

    Suggestions welcome on a rear rack that will never break, not huge$$$ and fit over disc brakes.

    And yes I know a Troll would be great, but is it really worth 5x the cost of a no-name Nashbar?

  34. #434
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    Looks like machines for buggin out .

  35. #435
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    As promised, here are a few pics of the bike loaded. My first S24O was mostly on paved paths, with some flooded ATV trail fun. The bike was perfect. Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dscn0924.jpgPost your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dscn0904.jpgPost your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dscn0890.jpg
    You can read the full account of this short trip here: First S24O | Vlad's Bikes

  36. #436
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    Tour Divide Set-up - Carbon is good!

    Hey guysÖ

    Having lurked here for a long time, I thought Iíd share some thoughts on bike packing set-ups for the Tour Divide. This is a picture of my bike from this yearís race (hope it shows up - I'm new at this).

    Although Iím still learning, the two main messages I want to get across are: 1. Donít be shy to use carbon when weight is critical! and 2. You can fit a hell of a lot in a saddle pack and avoid using a big bulky handlebar bag if youíre not into them.

    The frame is a 2013 Scott Scale 29er (large) Ė they know what theyíre doing with carbon. I used Niner carbon forks (maybe a bit too stiff for the wash-board?), and Curve Cycling carbon rims (not as stiff as super expensive Enve wheels, but still up to the job). Thatís a lot of carbon. Itís incredibly strong and keeps the weight down.

    What are the issues with carbon in something like the Tour Divide? Well, it makes for a super harsh ride on washboard surfaces (steel would be much more comfortable, but waaaaay heavier). The other issue with carbon frames is that there doesn't seem to be much room for storage in the main triangle, even for large frames. This meant I needed to shift my bottle cages around (move them along the frame) to fit bottles under the Revelate Tanglebag (size small) Ė I used a Mount Skidmore bottle cage adapter for this. Youíll have a similar problem with a lot of carbon XC frames Ė they seem to have very small frame triangles these days.

    On balance though, carbon works for long bike packing adventures where minimal weight is important.

    On my second point Ė I often just use a Revelate Pocket on the bars. I used some cable ties to make sure the attachment was secure in the Tour Divide. Itís small and stays in-line with the body and can hold a surprising amount. You can also stuff things like bear-spray and a vest between the Pocket and the bars in the little sling that hangs underneath. The Revelate Viscacha saddle pack is enormous and carries my bivvy, sleeping bag, inflatable mat, insulation jacket, rain pants, rain jacket and a few other bits and pieces. Itís not waterproof though, so I pack my sleeping back and insulation jacket in a separate dry bag, within the saddle pack. Even with a lot of weight at the back, and light-weight carbon forks up front handling is fine - the odd weight distribution is surprisingly not an issue.

    So - carbon is good, and you don't need a massive handlebar bag if you don't want one. Just my $0.02.

    Happy riding!

    Jesse
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  37. #437
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    Quote Originally Posted by uberpower View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    What handlebars are those, and how do you like them?

  38. #438
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    count me interested as well, they look exactly like a Bontrager unit i've been unsuccessfully trying to find.

  39. #439
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_papa_nuts View Post
    What handlebars are those, and how do you like them?
    The handlebars are called "Humpert Space Bugel". I bought them on ebay. (Humpert Space Bugel Handlebars Cruiser MTB Town 25 4mm | eBay)
    I like the sweep angle and the multiple hand positions for longer rides. If you grab them all the way at the front, the air resistance becomes practically equivalent to riding in the drops of road handlebars.

  40. #440
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    Can I get by with hayes or shimano 203 caliper to post adapter (clearance) with a formula caliper?
    It should be ok. I fitted Formula RX calipers on generic adapters (could be Shimano, Hayes or No name) with no issue.

    Any advantage to using a wider rim with tires like the wtb weirwolfs I already have. Example: Sun makes downhill rims that are abt 1.5 in.?
    If you plan on using wide as hell tyres then yes. If you don't... well don't bother.
    I toured Switzerland (twice) with a pair of Mavic Crossride wheels fitted with a Michelin country dry 2.00 front and a Geax "I-forgot-the-model-name" rear with no issue.
    You may have cornering issues if you fit a wide tyre to a narrow rim and vice-versa. Usually wheel makers mention the max tyre width you can fit.

  41. #441
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    Quote Originally Posted by papanoel View Post
    Usually wheel makers mention the max tyre width you can fit.
    Mavic like to recommend a range of tyre widths for their rims which is *extremely* conservative, and common practice sees people using significantly wider tyres on both road and MTB rims without problems. IIRC Mavic say Open Pros are good for up to 28mm, but 32mm is definitely okay, and most "35mm" tyres are okay too. Obviously, it is possible to go too far, and attempting to run very wide tyres on narrow rims at low pressures is asking for trouble.

    If you DO want to run very low pressures (say much less than 20PSI), the tyre will generally be more stable on a wider rim than a narrower one. See here for a good discussion: Tech Tuesday ? Wider Rims Are Better and Why Tubeless Tires Burp Air - Pinkbike

  42. #442
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    First go at this, a quick ride revealed my front bag could use some work. lol
    The frame and tool bags are bushwhacker, the rest is stuff I pieced together. Gotta go cheap for a while anyway. I have a walrus micro swift tent I have barely used that seems to be well suited for this.

  43. #443
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    Ogre

    Here's my Ogre loaded for my first dirt overnighter. Not quite as trim as I might have preferred (as I had to pack a two-person tent), but good enough for a quick adventure.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_2968.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_2981.jpg  


  44. #444
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    Bikepacking rig

    My Surly Ogre fully loaded. In the frame bag I have tools, bladder, cc and cash, two tubes, iPod, rain pants, sometimes a rain coat, food!, arm warmers and gloves. In the seat bag I have a fleece (it was way to big!) an extra jersey, socks, long underwear (top and bottom), a sew kit, maps. In the handlebar bag I have a BD bivy, and a montbell sleeping bag, these are wrapped in a ultralight tarp. In the backpack is where the bladder was when I didn't have things packed well, along with a lot of food. I have four water bottles and a bladder which got me to 3.5 to 4 liters of water. Enough to get 93 miles without a huge desire for more. Also on the handlebars is a Garmin and a wireless cyclometer. This got me through nights as cold as 30ish and rain in my sleeping bag and bivy or 40ish and raining on the bike. For anyone curious it is a selle an atomica saddle. Also those are surly open bars with ergon grips and clip on aero bars. The rear wheel is a handbuilt stans ZTR flow with 36 (custom gold colored) spokes. The front is a Mavic Tn719. Both wheels are on XT hubs. Also all X9 components except the cranks which are X7. The brakes are BB7's.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_0174.jpg  


  45. #445
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    My Rig and gear packed

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-packout.jpg
    2014 Scott CX Comp (gravel grinder)
    2014 Surly "OPS"
    2013 Scott Scale 960

    I'm a beer drinker with a mountain bike problem...

  46. #446
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    I was struggling along with this



    But just bought myself a birthday preasent... this




  47. #447
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ottocat View Post
    I was struggling along with this...
    Ottocat, what model is that Dahon? It has 24 inch wheels? My folder has 406 wheels, which leave a lot to be desired off road, but it sure gives a lot of options for carrying stuff.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-p9140261.jpg  

    Recalculating....

  48. #448
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    Hi Rodar... it's the Cadenza, 26 inch wheels... and that certainly is a lot of stuff .. lol

  49. #449
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    Haha! I got a few comments on the trip that picture is from by people who were amazed by how LITTLE stuff I had, but yeah, in the context of this subforum, I pack pretty heavy. I`ve pared it down considerably since I started, and will likely shave a tiny bit more (or not), but I`m pretty happy with the overall load:comfort balance I carry these days.
    Recalculating....

  50. #450
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    My rig!!

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_1553.jpg

    So i'm riding 2009 Rocky mountain Altitude 70

    Bags are both Revalate bags on the front and under the seat!

    And an "Extra Wheel" behind, i'm in North Queensland, Australia which means it's quite hot here so the trailer is great for carrying enough water (average of 36 degree celsius on the last trip)

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