Page 7 of 25 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 17 ... LastLast
Results 151 to 175 of 603
  1. #151
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5,719
    Quote Originally Posted by woody.1 View Post
    Here's a photo of my rig at Boulton Creek Trading Post in Canada June 9th, 2012....

    ...I wish I could have gotten into the race, but I guess it
    was meant to be.
    That storm front sat there for 4-5 days.
    Nasty! How did you get out of the situation?
    I got caught in a terrible windstorm earlier this year, hitched a ride back to my truck, and drove to "camp" at Motel 6 that night. The pickle that I was in wasn`t as dangerous as yours, but I know how you feel having to throw in the towel.

  2. #152
    mtbr member
    Reputation: woody.1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    240
    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Nasty! How did you get out of the situation?
    I got caught in a terrible windstorm earlier this year, hitched a ride back to my truck, and drove to "camp" at Motel 6 that night. The pickle that I was in wasn`t as dangerous as yours, but I know how you feel having to throw in the towel.
    If I would have some dry clothes I would have pushed on.

    I was at the camp store and a camper that had enough of the weather had packed it in and was heading to Canmore and they gave me a ride.

    I thought about drying my gear out in Canmore and trying a restart or get a ride back to the store, but this storm was there for almost 5 days and with all that happened it just took the wind out of my sail. (no pun on yours)

    Woody

  3. #153
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    773
    Had a great, but cut short because of knee pain, weekend in North GA. Thanks to Dave Muse for the awesome route. I also stole lots of info from other bike packing setups and nailed the equipment. It was perfect. The only thing I might could change is move the water from my back to a custom frame pack, but even that is a maybe as the bike right now handles SO awesome.

    Setup and gear list: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/...mR6YzBGdnFnOFE

    Pics:






    -Tom

  4. #154
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    940
    Digging that setup, Tom. Does look like it'd handle dreamily. Nice work

  5. #155
    Disabled Vet
    Reputation: longhaultrucker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,014
    Setup for gravel-grindg-camping and railtrail touring with my (10 year old son)...




    '96 Specialized Hard Rock
    '11 Origin 8 700CX
    '13 On One Inbred
    '14 Surly Troll

  6. #156
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    59
    Not a road bike, but heres my old touring setup.



    if you want to see everypic
    kdirk's albums - Imgur


    looking to get a mountain bike so that I am no longer bothered by cars and cities on my trips

  7. #157
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5,719
    Quote Originally Posted by kdirk View Post
    Not a road bike, but heres my old touring setup.

    looking to get a mountain bike so that I am no longer bothered by cars and cities on my trips
    I think you get the honors for first posting of downtube shifters in this thread

    I`d never try to talk anybody out of N+2, but it looks like you`re doing a pretty good job of avoiding cars and cities on that C-dale.

  8. #158
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Pete Otis Towns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    227

    My set-up

    1st solo trip on the Colorado trail - Waterton canyon to Buffalo creek.

    JPaks frame bag, I highly recommend Joe who custom made this frame pack at a very reasonable price.
    Relevate Designs seat bag.
    Sleeping bag is a fleece bag from REI, didn't need much else since the low was 60 degrees.
    Tent is Sierra Designs lightyear
    Sleeping pad is 2.5' big agnes (awesome)

    Total weight on the bike was right at 10 lbs. and weight on my back was about 15 lbs. I kept all food and water on my back.
    Attached Images Attached Images        
    Last edited by Pete Otis Towns; 07-05-2012 at 09:16 PM.
    Without rules, we all might as well be up in a tree flinging our crap at each other. Red Foreman - That 70's show.

  9. #159
    Bikes are good
    Reputation: Elfbkr50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    785

    Yeti another Big Top

    Just a backpack strapped to a seat post rack. That is more than I ever want to drag 100 miles again. Denali National Park
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_1133.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_1151.jpg  

    "Having lack of self-preservation makes biking more fun."

  10. #160
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,088
    Quote Originally Posted by Elfbkr50 View Post
    Just a backpack strapped to a seat post rack. That is more than I ever want to drag 100 miles again. Denali National Park
    How much did it weigh? What made it too much? having all the weight on the rear? total load? It actually looks like a really really small load.

  11. #161
    Bikes are good
    Reputation: Elfbkr50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    785

    Small load

    It was a small load. Trip was 110 miles or so, but had to pack a tent in case Denali made weather that it likes to make. I wouldn't go out there without that set up, but on this trip it was bluebird all through the night. My post is more of a joke compared to the rigs you guys have posted up. I do 100+ and longer days in 1 long uncomfortable day if I do them.
    "Having lack of self-preservation makes biking more fun."

  12. #162
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,088
    ah, gotcha.

  13. #163
    mtbr member
    Reputation: connolm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    306

    My rig.

    I just completed my first overnighter. I did almost 60 miles of the Bay Circuit Trail north of Boston. I wrote up a trip report here.

    The bike is one of those mail-order Chinese Carbon 29ers that have been discussed in the MTBR's version of War And Peace (3444 posts with 616,739 views!) You can see the particulars of my build here.

    Here it is loaded up:


    I chose to ride with a backpack: the Camelbak Vantage.

    The frame-bag is the Sunlite Epic Tour that I got for $28. I put my stove, tent, tent poles, and stakes in there.



    The saddle bag is an expandable bag I got at REI years ago. My tools, spares, and hygiene stuff (soap, shampoo, toothpaste, etc.) go in there.



    The handlebar bag is from Sunlite and contains my food and electronics.



    Here's a spreadsheet with most everything I carried listed by weight. The setup comes to about 18.4 lbs - not counting water.


  14. #164
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    439

    Zuni Mountain Overnighter

    ...or How I Spent my 44th Birthday

    Gear
    tarp, paracord, stakes, long underwear top, 40 degree bag, therm-a-rest pad, raincoat, first aid, food (cold: bars, sesame noodles in a bag for dinner, pbj sandwiches), iphone, bike tools, water, bb pistol (mostly for noise), lighter/matches, compass, map, bug spray, Dr. Bronners soap, toothpaste/toothbrush, TP, a few wipes, bandanas and...2 beers .

    Setup
    Bike: '94 Gary Fisher hoo koo e koo w/rigid fork, WTB Mutano 2.4 up front, Kenda Lopes 55 2.35 in the back. I was very pleased with this tire setup.

    Bags/Racks: old Blackburn aluminum rear rack, Nashbar rear paniers, under seat bag, water bottle cages on frame and fork (1 liter bottled water containers work great in these cages and are cheaper than bike bottles)

    Wore a Camelback Rogue (1.5l).

    How it gets packed
    All bike tools go in my Camelback along with snacks and the bb pistol, sleeping pad under the bars. The remainder is balanced between the paniers and the tarp bungied across the top of the rack (bungie used to hang panier as a bear bag at night). In the end I brought more water and food than I needed. I could have stayed out two nights with this set up.

    Not the lightest ride, but I go with what I've got. Plus this GF frame is one tough nut - perfect application for it. I actually thought this would be harder than it was. I was up and down between 7500' and 9000' with more than a few steep rocky climbs but only had to walk it twice - and those sections were pretty short.

    For those contemplating this for the first time, I can't encourage it enough. I don't have specialized equipment or a particularly light bike, but I keep the gear as light as I can. Just keep it simple, start small and go for it!


    Ready to roll


    On the trail


    Setting up camp, drinking a brew


    Shelter


    Sunset
    Last edited by wahday; 07-08-2012 at 04:14 PM.

  15. #165
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    28
    My first bikepacking overnight. Plan on doing some of the Colorado Trail later this month. I think I'm hooked!














  16. #166
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5,719
    Cool, Ace. ^^Is that a TT Contrail?

  17. #167
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    4
    Loving these pics! I had a test load up of mine and revealed some things I need to work on before my maiden voyage.

  18. #168
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Cool, Ace. ^^Is that a TT Contrail?
    Yes the Contrail. Set it up in the back yard with the carbon pole and thought the wind was going to blow it over. I then got an aluminum pole from a cheap tent I use and it works great. I made the handle bar bag to fit the tent and pole.
    I also made the frame bag and the other handle bar bag. The seat bag is from a guy in Boulder, CO that makes them. The backpack is an Osprey Atmos 35.

  19. #169
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5,719
    Memories of front entry puptents when I was a kid have kept me away from Contrail, but the combination of weight, packed size (which is where the Moment goes awry), and price have me rethinking things. Does the tunnel entrance bother you? Are you able to get into a bag from the side or do you have to sit in the dirt and crawl in (to a sleepingbag) from the end?

  20. #170
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,036
    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Memories of front entry puptents when I was a kid have kept me away from Contrail, but the combination of weight, packed size (which is where the Moment goes awry), and price have me rethinking things. Does the tunnel entrance bother you? Are you able to get into a bag from the side or do you have to sit in the dirt and crawl in (to a sleepingbag) from the end?
    Love mine. Wanted the Moment, but I'm a drop bar Fargo rider, so it complicates possible attachment locations and the Contrail just packs down smaller. Even after many emails back and forth with Henry Shires.


    There is enough room in there to get into a bag from the side. Not luxurious, but enough space to get in on top of the bag, open it up and slide in.

    I can sleep with my 4 year old in mine. 42" wide at the entry.


  21. #171
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,036

    IMAG4146 by mbeganyi, on Flickr


    next time it gets setup i'll take a pic with a bag and pad in it.
    i had no issues with the standard pole they sell.

    it could be a little stiffer for when you cinch everything down into storm pitch, but it works well enough. i have read that you can rig it with a tree or a stick...

  22. #172
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    28
    Yes the Contrail works great for me. I was worried about the size also, but it is large enough to enter head first and sit at the door end. It is large enough to move around in and enter the sleeping bag without any problems. Much better than those little triangle tents.

  23. #173
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5,719
    Thanks for the info, guys. Good to hear there`s enough room to get in to a bag from the side and even better to hear there`s enough space to turn around after crawling in head first.

    Still, I sure wish the Moment were shorter. If you guys haven`t been on Shires`s site recently, he has a new one called the Notch, which is side entry, slightly heavier than Contrail, and packs to 16 OAL. It uses two poles though, and costs more than either Moment or Contrail. It also uses struts for the triangular end vents, but they must be removeable for it to pack four inches shorter than the moment- I`ll have to watch the setup video to see for sure. I wonder if he`ll redesign the Moment with removeable struts so it`ll pack up as well as the Notch? When I get ready to write a check, I`ll probably call or email and see what the man says.

  24. #174
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,036
    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Thanks for the info, guys. Good to hear there`s enough room to get in to a bag from the side and even better to hear there`s enough space to turn around after crawling in head first.

    Still, I sure wish the Moment were shorter. If you guys haven`t been on Shires`s site recently, he has a new one called the Notch, which is side entry, slightly heavier than Contrail, and packs to 16 OAL. It uses two poles though, and costs more than either Moment or Contrail. It also uses struts for the triangular end vents, but they must be removeable for it to pack four inches shorter than the moment- I`ll have to watch the setup video to see for sure. I wonder if he`ll redesign the Moment with removeable struts so it`ll pack up as well as the Notch? When I get ready to write a check, I`ll probably call or email and see what the man says.

    I do believe you can remove the struts from the moment, but they are a pain to do.

  25. #175
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,036
    Quote Originally Posted by bmike View Post
    I do believe you can remove the struts from the moment, but they are a pain to do.
    from an email from Henry Shires when I was comparing the Moment to the Contrail:

    The Moment arch pole folds to 20" and strut ends fold to 18". The struts can be removed--we insert them through slits in the rear sleeves--and the pole can of course be store separately.
    From what I know of the Contrail, installing the struts each time you pitch would be a PITA, and defeat the whole point of getting the Moment, which pitches fast.

    In the end, I could have gone Moment, as it would fit low under my front bag, sliding under the drops. But I'm happy enough with the Contrail. Aside from needing more time to be in it out in the woods.

Page 7 of 25 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 17 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •