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  1. #401
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    The Sweet Roll looks neater for flat bars, but there's no way it's going to work with drop bars, i.e. on a Fargo, so the Harness is still useful.

  2. #402
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    Re: Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)

    The harness and a pocket for cell phone and misc stuff looks perfect. Any other good manufacturers to consider?

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I727 using Tapatalk 2
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  4. #404
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    El Mariachi with a Fargo fork, upside down Mary bars. Fun Fun Fun.
    Tent, sleeping bag and stove up front. Food in the frame bag and all sorts of clothing in the seat bag.

    No back pack needed with this set up.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-el-mariachi-bikepacking.jpg  


  5. #405
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    New Frame Bag

    This is my new frame bag. Made to fit my 2007 Giant XTC C1 by Bike Bag Dude. Very nice fit, 2 zips, waterproof.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-image.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-image.jpg  


  6. #406
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    Quote Originally Posted by satanas View Post
    The Sweet Roll looks neater for flat bars, but there's no way it's going to work with drop bars, i.e. on a Fargo, so the Harness is still useful.
    Works fine on my Fargo with drop bars.

  7. #407
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    ^ Okay, how? From the pix on Revelate's website it appears to me that the Sweet Roll is just too wide to fit into the space available. However, I'm interested in being able to carry stuff on normal width road bike bars, and my Fargo has 42 cm Woodchippers, not 46 cm. Also, I'm not prepared to have my hands rubbing against the bag.

  8. #408
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    Quote Originally Posted by satanas View Post
    ^ Okay, how? From the pix on Revelate's website it appears to me that the Sweet Roll is just too wide to fit into the space available.
    Just roll up the ends until you have clearance. I'm able to fit my sleeping gear (tent, poles/stakes, sleeping bag) without the ends mashing against the bars and I have just enough clearance for my hands.

  9. #409
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    Aha! Now I understand - the pix show the bags at what is probably full width on flat bars and there's no way something that wide would work for me on the drop bars. (I wonder if my order has shipped yet? Maybe I can switch if not.)

  10. #410
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    Krampus set up for S24O

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    Sleeping bag, down jacket and air pillow in the Wildcat seatpack, air mat and bivvy bag in the Wildcat front harness, food, stove, bike spares etc kindle in the Revelate frame bag.

    I used a wingnut to carry water and spare clothing/wet stuff

    More info here

    Confused ?

    More pics here

    S24O - a set on Flickr

  11. #411
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    Nice pix! I haven't been to Anglesey since I collected a frame from Tony Oliver in Rhosybol in 1982. It's hard to ride there from Sydney...

    BTW, what cranks and cassette are you using and does the chain rub against the tyre in any gears? Thanks!

  12. #412
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    I'm hoping to move to Anglesey permantly in a few years time when the last of the cuckoo's has finally flown the nest :-)

    Straight through XT 2x10 set up, no rubs, documented with pics on the Krampus thread

  13. #413
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    Thanks; I must have missed it. (I thought Surly were saying 2x10 was going to rub.)

    Hopefully will get to the UK in 2015, not sure where yet.

  14. #414
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    Did my first bikepacking overnighter with my son over the weekend. 10 miles on trails the first day to "boat in" campground, then 30+ miles the next day to get back home on mostly paved roads. The Surly Cross Check did awesome, and was surprisingly well behaved loaded pretty tail heavy. I added some bungee cords around the panniers to quiet them down, but other than that it was a great setup. It would be great to add a front harness and a top pocket for the sleeping bag, ground cover, maps, cell phone, etc.


    Surly Cross Check 52cm
    Ultegra shifters/derailleurs w/ road triple crank
    Shorty 6 Cantis
    Continental 700x35c Cyclocross Speed tires (GREAT multipurpose tire)
    Cheap a$$ rack and panniers (mostly for commuting, and would want something stronger for long trips)



    I packed pretty light for this trip, and opted to sleep under the stars rather than bring a tent. It was no less than 55F overnight, and the bugs weren't bad. The heaviest items were food, sleeping bag and the water filter. I don't think my whole setup weighed more than 45#, using the ultra-accurate heft with one arm method.
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  15. #415
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoHeadsBrewing View Post
    Did my first bikepacking overnighter with my son over the weekend. 10 miles on trails the first day to "boat in" campground, then 30+ miles the next day to get back home on mostly paved roads. The Surly Cross Check did awesome, and was surprisingly well behaved loaded pretty tail heavy. I added some bungee cords around the panniers to quiet them down, but other than that it was a great setup. It would be great to add a front harness and a top pocket for the sleeping bag, ground cover, maps, cell phone, etc.


    Surly Cross Check 52cm
    Ultegra shifters/derailleurs w/ road triple crank
    Shorty 6 Cantis
    Continental 700x35c Cyclocross Speed tires (GREAT multipurpose tire)
    Cheap a$$ rack and panniers (mostly for commuting, and would want something stronger for long trips)



    I packed pretty light for this trip, and opted to sleep under the stars rather than bring a tent. It was no less than 55F overnight, and the bugs weren't bad. The heaviest items were food, sleeping bag and the water filter. I don't think my whole setup weighed more than 45#, using the ultra-accurate heft with one arm method.
    I thought about going to that same boat-in spot for my first s24s but ended up going to Little Grass . Sounds like a good trip ,thanks for sharing......Mike

  16. #416
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    '99 Jamis Dakota frame with an Xtracycle kit. This was last weekend camping with my wife and some friends, me carrying all the gear for my wife and I.

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-xc_grb_rest.jpg

    The suspension fork I have on there doesn't work well, it just isn't heavy duty enough to accommodate the long frame. It flexes a lot more than I'm comfortable with, so I ordered a surly big dummy fork this morning.

  17. #417
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    Your my hero man still trying to get my wife out there.
    Quote Originally Posted by SweetSVT99 View Post
    '99 Jamis Dakota frame with an Xtracycle kit. This was last weekend camping with my wife and some friends, me carrying all the gear for my wife and I.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The suspension fork I have on there doesn't work well, it just isn't heavy duty enough to accommodate the long frame. It flexes a lot more than I'm comfortable with, so I ordered a surly big dummy fork this morning.

  18. #418
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unchewable View Post
    Your my hero man still trying to get my wife out there.
    It was a pretty easy sell really. She likes riding and camping, I just had to commit myself to carrying basically double the gear. She likes that all the weight slows me down to her pace too.

  19. #419
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    The week before the tour divide I rode the route to elkford and then returned via some amazing singletrack. An awesome and ridiculously beautiful 6 day, 6 night trip.

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    my sleep setup. I love the hammock. It's about 40F and drizzling. The sleeping bag is airing out before I pack it up and head off. Having the bike under the tarp is a great way to keep the parts happy.

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dscn4950.jpg
    kananaskis lake. The small revelate designs tangle bag just barely holds a nearly full 100oz camelback bladder. Nice to have it off my back. Pika seat bag was perfect for a small krampus with lots of seatpost exposed. I had tried the vascacha on a test trip and it was tough keeping it off the tire.

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    the outdoor research 25L lateral bag was great, but required some muscle and extra webbing to keep it off the tire. It held my bulky 20F synthetic bag and air mattress.

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    krampus did not like this muck! momentum carried me in and it was tough to get out without filling my shoes with it.

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    krampus did not do well in the melting snow. I could sort of stay in control on mild descents. fortunately there wasn't much snow to cross.

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dscn5054.jpg
    Elbow Lake, quite possibly the most beautiful place in the world.

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    I pretty much stayed awake most of the night hanging on to my tarp (literally much of the time) in case this nasty storm pulled my tarp stakes out of the ground.
    Last edited by PretendGentleman; 06-24-2013 at 02:15 PM.

  20. #420
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    my revised set up; going lighter and using a different bicycle for now;

    Using all USGI MOLLE/ALICE equipment;
    front bag holds my sleeping bag; and tarp/ground cover with poles and long boot laces for guy lines; first aid kit is attached to side of bag, and a 1qt canteen pouch with my canteen, fire starting kit, Sterno burner, canteen stove, and gloves;


    bag behind bars holds spare tire tubes, small tool kit, leatherman multi-tool, and washcloth; then I have two canteens on the frame (each holds 2 quarts),


    the side bags in rear holds clothes, fleece sweater, light rain jacket, while green large pouches on the rearmost holds food and cooking utensils, and the bag on the top holds my 10x9 BQ grill with a plastic bag holding some charcoal briquettes for cooking; its a little heavier than some of you guys' set ups, but it works great for me




    the whole set up assembled; I am thinking either I get rid of the ground cover; and poles, or I get a front rack to help support the front bag;

  21. #421
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    Pics from a few recent trips, including one with my 12 year old son. He had a great time!

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-bikes.jpg

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_0817.jpg

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_0842.jpg

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-milo-big-tank.jpg

  22. #422
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    Quote Originally Posted by CamoDeafie View Post
    my revised set up; going lighter and using a different bicycle for now;

    Using all USGI MOLLE/ALICE equipment;
    front bag holds my sleeping bag; and tarp/ground cover with poles and long boot laces for guy lines; first aid kit is attached to side of bag, and a 1qt canteen pouch with my canteen, fire starting kit, Sterno burner, canteen stove, and gloves;


    bag behind bars holds spare tire tubes, small tool kit, leatherman multi-tool, and washcloth; then I have two canteens on the frame (each holds 2 quarts),


    the side bags in rear holds clothes, fleece sweater, light rain jacket, while green large pouches on the rearmost holds food and cooking utensils, and the bag on the top holds my 10x9 BQ grill with a plastic bag holding some charcoal briquettes for cooking; its a little heavier than some of you guys' set ups, but it works great for me




    the whole set up assembled; I am thinking either I get rid of the ground cover; and poles, or I get a front rack to help support the front bag;
    Wow, that's a lot of bags. I tried to strap my Teton tent to my H-Bars, but I couldn't get it to not interfere with my dual control levers. That tent is like 4 or 5 pounds and makes a 2' long tube when rolled up. I keep thinking maybe I should get a more compact tent or bivy, but I'm not sure I want to spend real money on this project until I do a few trips and figure out what works and what doesn't.

    You did a nice job of getting a lot of bags up front.

  23. #423
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    Wow, that's a lot of bags. I tried to strap my Teton tent to my H-Bars, but I couldn't get it to not interfere with my dual control levers. That tent is like 4 or 5 pounds and makes a 2' long tube when rolled up. I keep thinking maybe I should get a more compact tent or bivy, but I'm not sure I want to spend real money on this project until I do a few trips and figure out what works and what doesn't.

    You did a nice job of getting a lot of bags up front.
    I decided to revise my set up once again; simplifying and reducing size of bags down; and reducing weight more..this is a 2-3, maybe 4 days set up if I can get enough food to fit in the panniers; or into the various small pouches;
    this time though; I ditched the tarp, the heavy ground cover (was a double layer poncho I made 15 years ago), the extra red blanket...and took out my Stansports Scout A-Frame backpackers tent; Stansport Scout 2 Person Nylon Tent; then folded it in half, put my blue sleep pad in there, and my sleeping bag in there.. then rolled it up, and used an USGI M1967 sleep roll carrier to hold it all in; without the poles and stakes/rope/rubber mallet, it weights just shy of 5 pounds. the poles/stakes/rope/rubber mallet, all are in one pannier with the food and bbq grill , the small pouches up front holds my first aid kit in one pouch, rain jacket in another, canteen cup and sterno burners/fire starting kit in a canteen pouch, and small foods. socks in the other canteen pouch; the handlebar brick bag holds my tools, spare tube, phone, small camera, washcloth, and cable lock, the other pannier bag holds my clothing; and on top of the rear rack I have a Spec Ops hydration bladder that holds my two 2-qt canteens.
    front; I realize it looks way huge and bulky... but its not wider than my handlebars; despite the perspective lol

    small pouches attached to front rack, canteen pouches in front positions, USGI USMC First Aid Kit pouches in back positions; yes the rain jacket packed that small.

    the back; showing the hydration pouch holding the canteens and the side pannier bags.

    overall shot; if the area I'm camping in, has enough trees close together, I could leave the poles behind... I am seriously considering getting a pair of graphite or similar tent poles and modifying them to fit the height of the A-frame tent and thus be much lighter than the aluminum pole sections; and pack smaller/slimmer; or be attached to the top tube via straps....not sure yet. the heaviest single items are the canteens with 2 qts each....and then the rubber mallet for driving the stakes down in hard dirt.

  24. #424
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    Camodeafie — I get the impression that half the fun for you is in the preparation! Which is the case for many people. I'm glad to see you paring down your load. If you haven't already gone on an outing, I would strongly encourage you to try the overnight/S24O idea. I'm guessing you will find that your perspective changes radically when you are actually on the bike and mashing up hills, etc. I know mine did. Suddenly all my "be prepared for anything" approach was replaced with a determination to streamline my entire setup dramatically. We all do this a little differently, but I think you might find the road is the best way to decide what to keep and what to jettison. Good luck!

  25. #425
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    Owlish, thanks! I'm trying to find information on Bowers Rock State Park; whether it is possible to get there overland...as it is very close but officially it's not vehicle accessible; however, can be walked in..... or boated in. (it's on the river) a Pity I don't have a raft hahaha
    EDIT:: Bowers Rock State Park is Boat Access ONLY; (no recognized legal overland access; all overland access points are private property) And NO camping allowed. So essentially; it is a day use park for boaters and residents of the properties around it this is according to the email I got from Oregon State Parks and Recreation.
    Last edited by CamoDeafie; 07-30-2013 at 03:47 PM.

  26. #426
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    Great setups. Next year I'm looking at doing a big bike tour and these have given me some great ideas for how to craft my packs.
    Adventure Strong | Hiking, Mountain Biking, and Adventure Travel
    http://www.adventurestrong.com

  27. #427
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-9441744825_74541250ef_o.jpg
    Hi folks, I am new to bikepacking, and this is the rig that plan on taking on S24O trips outside Montreal later this month.

    The bike is a 23" 2011 Trek Marlin 29er, mostly stock, used for bad-weather and daily winter commuting since new. The generic Nashbar rigid fork pictured replaced a cheap Suntour suspension unit that seized after 2 winters without any maintenance.

    I plan on attaching a modified medium-sized backpack between the front rack and the handlebars (a commuting setup that has worked exceptionally well for me so far). The rear rack will receive a trunk bag. I am thinking this will be enough storage space to fit a Hennessy Hammock, sleeping bag, Trangia stove and one day's worth of food.

    Any feedback/suggestions will be much appreciated. I'll post a pic of the bike loaded at some point next weekend.

  28. #428
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    I'd try to keep the front end load light, and any weight carried there down as low as possible and close to the head tube, otherwise steering on slow off-road climbs is going to get really heavy. There'll be a lot more shock-loading on the front rack off-road than commuting too, and of it's alu I wouldn't be too surprised if it broke at the welds sooner rather than later...

  29. #429
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    ^ point well taken. The front pack will mostly contain the sleeping bag, hammock and clothes, which should bring it to around 10 lbs. The backpack is very close to the head tube and is partly (~30%) suspended from the handlebars. I will try this out on tame dirt roads, but the longer-term vision is to likely move toward a rack-less setup.

  30. #430
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    It's amazing how little one needs to survive overnight in good weather. Years ago a friend and I did a couple of Polaris Challenges here in Oz, and some people managed to fit all the required gear into a rackpack, nothing else. I'm not saying this was a comfortable option (at night), but goes to show that one can get away with less than might be suspected. If going out for multiple nights, wanting to be comfortable in foul weather and carrying food, more carrying capacity will be needed(!), but I reckon you ought to be able to survive for a few days on a rackpack (~10-15 litres) plus a small rucksack (~20 litres or so).

    If you really want to push things, here's one way: Ultralight bicycle touring

    Best of luck and have fun!

  31. #431
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-548306_10151626707504398_578065630_n.jpg

    2009 Kona Jake. Two large Nashbar panniers and I was able to fit all of my camping gear for my ride in Denali. Also doubles as my daily commuter

  32. #432
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    Very cool, Falconpunch! Aftetr this pic, I went "spying" on you and found the trip repot:
    Bikepacking Denali
    Hope you don`t mind.
    Recalculating....

  33. #433
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    I have most of what I need for a budget 26-inch build intended for mountain touring on mainly ST, some road. Have a Nashbar HT alu frame, RS Dart 3 fork, X9 twist-shifters, FSA Hammer headset, LX FD, Deore 3x9 octalink crank, X9 RD. Brakes, I intend to run a Formula RX front on a 203 disc, rear 203 also, Hayes mechanical. I don't have wheels yet, thinking 36-hole 6-bolt mount usual 100/135mm with rim track if I decide to use or later put on a front v-brake for backup (can you tell I have had a hydraulic disc failure b4?). Low-tech shock post, surly constrictor clamp.

    Using Nashbar slim panniers on rear, plan to be travelling with minimal equip. in fair weather, maybe Kokopelli or Calif. deserts/mtns. I already have a quick carbon-frame FS XC bike, but I don't want on-trail repair hassles or bobbing suspension with loaded panniers, or have to rely on lockouts.

    The idea for this low-buck generic build is bomb-proof reliability, nothing exotic, cheap/possible to fix in nowheresville, and brakes that will never ever die. Except for the frame, I picked up most of the components from bike swaps and local ads. Decent reliable used wheels are not common here for some reason.

    Questions:

    Can I get by with hayes or shimano 203 caliper to post adapter (clearance) with a formula caliper?

    Any advantage to using a wider rim with tires like the wtb weirwolfs I already have. Example: Sun makes downhill rims that are abt 1.5 in.?

    Suggestions welcome on a rear rack that will never break, not huge$$$ and fit over disc brakes.

    And yes I know a Troll would be great, but is it really worth 5x the cost of a no-name Nashbar?

  34. #434
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    Looks like machines for buggin out .

  35. #435
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    As promised, here are a few pics of the bike loaded. My first S24O was mostly on paved paths, with some flooded ATV trail fun. The bike was perfect. Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dscn0924.jpgPost your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dscn0904.jpgPost your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dscn0890.jpg
    You can read the full account of this short trip here: First S24O | Vlad's Bikes

  36. #436
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    Tour Divide Set-up - Carbon is good!

    Hey guys…

    Having lurked here for a long time, I thought I’d share some thoughts on bike packing set-ups for the Tour Divide. This is a picture of my bike from this year’s race (hope it shows up - I'm new at this).

    Although I’m still learning, the two main messages I want to get across are: 1. Don’t be shy to use carbon when weight is critical! and 2. You can fit a hell of a lot in a saddle pack and avoid using a big bulky handlebar bag if you’re not into them.

    The frame is a 2013 Scott Scale 29er (large) – they know what they’re doing with carbon. I used Niner carbon forks (maybe a bit too stiff for the wash-board?), and Curve Cycling carbon rims (not as stiff as super expensive Enve wheels, but still up to the job). That’s a lot of carbon. It’s incredibly strong and keeps the weight down.

    What are the issues with carbon in something like the Tour Divide? Well, it makes for a super harsh ride on washboard surfaces (steel would be much more comfortable, but waaaaay heavier). The other issue with carbon frames is that there doesn't seem to be much room for storage in the main triangle, even for large frames. This meant I needed to shift my bottle cages around (move them along the frame) to fit bottles under the Revelate Tanglebag (size small) – I used a Mount Skidmore bottle cage adapter for this. You’ll have a similar problem with a lot of carbon XC frames – they seem to have very small frame triangles these days.

    On balance though, carbon works for long bike packing adventures where minimal weight is important.

    On my second point – I often just use a Revelate Pocket on the bars. I used some cable ties to make sure the attachment was secure in the Tour Divide. It’s small and stays in-line with the body and can hold a surprising amount. You can also stuff things like bear-spray and a vest between the Pocket and the bars in the little sling that hangs underneath. The Revelate Viscacha saddle pack is enormous and carries my bivvy, sleeping bag, inflatable mat, insulation jacket, rain pants, rain jacket and a few other bits and pieces. It’s not waterproof though, so I pack my sleeping back and insulation jacket in a separate dry bag, within the saddle pack. Even with a lot of weight at the back, and light-weight carbon forks up front handling is fine - the odd weight distribution is surprisingly not an issue.

    So - carbon is good, and you don't need a massive handlebar bag if you don't want one. Just my $0.02.

    Happy riding!

    Jesse
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  37. #437
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    Quote Originally Posted by uberpower View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    What handlebars are those, and how do you like them?

  38. #438
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    count me interested as well, they look exactly like a Bontrager unit i've been unsuccessfully trying to find.

  39. #439
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_papa_nuts View Post
    What handlebars are those, and how do you like them?
    The handlebars are called "Humpert Space Bugel". I bought them on ebay. (Humpert Space Bugel Handlebars Cruiser MTB Town 25 4mm | eBay)
    I like the sweep angle and the multiple hand positions for longer rides. If you grab them all the way at the front, the air resistance becomes practically equivalent to riding in the drops of road handlebars.

  40. #440
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    Can I get by with hayes or shimano 203 caliper to post adapter (clearance) with a formula caliper?
    It should be ok. I fitted Formula RX calipers on generic adapters (could be Shimano, Hayes or No name) with no issue.

    Any advantage to using a wider rim with tires like the wtb weirwolfs I already have. Example: Sun makes downhill rims that are abt 1.5 in.?
    If you plan on using wide as hell tyres then yes. If you don't... well don't bother.
    I toured Switzerland (twice) with a pair of Mavic Crossride wheels fitted with a Michelin country dry 2.00 front and a Geax "I-forgot-the-model-name" rear with no issue.
    You may have cornering issues if you fit a wide tyre to a narrow rim and vice-versa. Usually wheel makers mention the max tyre width you can fit.

  41. #441
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    Quote Originally Posted by papanoel View Post
    Usually wheel makers mention the max tyre width you can fit.
    Mavic like to recommend a range of tyre widths for their rims which is *extremely* conservative, and common practice sees people using significantly wider tyres on both road and MTB rims without problems. IIRC Mavic say Open Pros are good for up to 28mm, but 32mm is definitely okay, and most "35mm" tyres are okay too. Obviously, it is possible to go too far, and attempting to run very wide tyres on narrow rims at low pressures is asking for trouble.

    If you DO want to run very low pressures (say much less than 20PSI), the tyre will generally be more stable on a wider rim than a narrower one. See here for a good discussion: Tech Tuesday ? Wider Rims Are Better and Why Tubeless Tires Burp Air - Pinkbike

  42. #442
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    First go at this, a quick ride revealed my front bag could use some work. lol
    The frame and tool bags are bushwhacker, the rest is stuff I pieced together. Gotta go cheap for a while anyway. I have a walrus micro swift tent I have barely used that seems to be well suited for this.

  43. #443
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    Ogre

    Here's my Ogre loaded for my first dirt overnighter. Not quite as trim as I might have preferred (as I had to pack a two-person tent), but good enough for a quick adventure.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_2968.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_2981.jpg  


  44. #444
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    Bikepacking rig

    My Surly Ogre fully loaded. In the frame bag I have tools, bladder, cc and cash, two tubes, iPod, rain pants, sometimes a rain coat, food!, arm warmers and gloves. In the seat bag I have a fleece (it was way to big!) an extra jersey, socks, long underwear (top and bottom), a sew kit, maps. In the handlebar bag I have a BD bivy, and a montbell sleeping bag, these are wrapped in a ultralight tarp. In the backpack is where the bladder was when I didn't have things packed well, along with a lot of food. I have four water bottles and a bladder which got me to 3.5 to 4 liters of water. Enough to get 93 miles without a huge desire for more. Also on the handlebars is a Garmin and a wireless cyclometer. This got me through nights as cold as 30ish and rain in my sleeping bag and bivy or 40ish and raining on the bike. For anyone curious it is a selle an atomica saddle. Also those are surly open bars with ergon grips and clip on aero bars. The rear wheel is a handbuilt stans ZTR flow with 36 (custom gold colored) spokes. The front is a Mavic Tn719. Both wheels are on XT hubs. Also all X9 components except the cranks which are X7. The brakes are BB7's.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_0174.jpg  


  45. #445
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    My Rig and gear packed

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-packout.jpg
    2014 Scott CX Comp (gravel grinder)
    2014 Surly "OPS"
    2013 Scott Scale 960

    I'm a beer drinker with a mountain bike problem...

  46. #446
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    I was struggling along with this



    But just bought myself a birthday preasent... this




  47. #447
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ottocat View Post
    I was struggling along with this...
    Ottocat, what model is that Dahon? It has 24 inch wheels? My folder has 406 wheels, which leave a lot to be desired off road, but it sure gives a lot of options for carrying stuff.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-p9140261.jpg  

    Recalculating....

  48. #448
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    Hi Rodar... it's the Cadenza, 26 inch wheels... and that certainly is a lot of stuff .. lol

  49. #449
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    Haha! I got a few comments on the trip that picture is from by people who were amazed by how LITTLE stuff I had, but yeah, in the context of this subforum, I pack pretty heavy. I`ve pared it down considerably since I started, and will likely shave a tiny bit more (or not), but I`m pretty happy with the overall load:comfort balance I carry these days.
    Recalculating....

  50. #450
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    My rig!!

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_1553.jpg

    So i'm riding 2009 Rocky mountain Altitude 70

    Bags are both Revalate bags on the front and under the seat!

    And an "Extra Wheel" behind, i'm in North Queensland, Australia which means it's quite hot here so the trailer is great for carrying enough water (average of 36 degree celsius on the last trip)

  51. #451
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    tibbsy, how much water do you normally use in a day? trying to plan for a trip next week.

  52. #452
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    It will really depend on how far you are intending to ride (and the temp), my last trip was only an overnighter and relatively short at about 30km each day. With riding, cooking and being around camp I used approx 6 litres. About 2.5 on the ride, 2 post ride and 1.5 for dinner and breakfast. Then another 2.5 litres the next day...

    I try and ensure I'm riding with a water source close, and carry a steri-pen!

  53. #453
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    I'm about to embark on two days with enough water for me and another person. That equates to about 14 liters on my bike. I'm not riding with a backpack and I'm taking a rather large sleeping pad. After my bike weighed in at about 75 lbs it should be a nice weekend of slowwww riding. Also a change of pace from the TD. I have to carry all of my food!

  54. #454
    gran jefe
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    thanks, guys!

  55. #455
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    On One Inbred with Karate Monkey fork, Rabbit Hole rims, Knard front and 2.4 Conti rear.

    Krampus almost stock.

  56. #456
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    Those On-One frames are lovely - how do you like their quality?

  57. #457
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dusza View Post
    Those On-One frames are lovely - how do you like their quality?
    Seems high. Attention to detail is better than Surly, but this is an older On One frame. I recently put together a 2013 Inbred for a friend and it was not as nice. The curved stays were gone, some braze-ons were missing, rear drops not modular.

  58. #458
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    Pugsley setup for bikepacking

    Here's my Pugsley setup. Homemade frame bag and seat bag. Revelate sweetroll bag up front. I also had a small Osprey backpack with beer and food.

    I'm currently kitting out my older Karate Monkey with an Ogre fork for a slightly lighter setup for a tropical bikepacking adventure over the winter holidays.

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-pugsley-bikepackingsetup.jpg
    Surly Pugsley, Salsa El Mariachi, Salsa Vaya

    Part time bag/pogie maker:
    http://wanderlust-gear.com

  59. #459
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    I rode across Sweden, and am about halfway along the southern coast of Norway now. I've been camping sometimes, staying in hostels sometimes - but as the weather's gotten colder and wetter, I have to admit I've stopped camping and am now doing the credit card thing. I don't have the physical constitution to handle 5-7 hours of riding a day in the low 40's, and camping overnight, all in rain. That's what the final week of my tour is shaping up to be...and if I'm lucky, I won't get snowed on.

    I have a tent, sleeping bag, pad, mini stove, down jacket, full rain gear, one full set of cold weather off-the-bike clothes, two bibs & jerseys, and a bunch of stuff that I'm lucky I haven't needed (like anti-blister pads and my emergency bivvy). As it is, I have room for two days' food and some extra water.

    Still, this is my first multi-day tour. I will definitely reconfigure things, change up the gear a bit, and get a 2-layer tent that I can completely set up and break down in the rain.
    Last edited by schnee; 08-11-2015 at 01:36 PM.

  60. #460
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    Schnee, cool set up. What're you using for a rack on your front forks? Those little Ortliebs look perfect up there.

  61. #461
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    Thanks! Front rack is a Tubus Duo. Since the Vaya fork has eyelets on both sides (which is plenty stable) I went the minimalist route.

  62. #462
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    Hey Fellas,

    This is a pic of my bike and bags prior to this year's CTR. The bags are made from Oveja Negra Threadworks in Leadville. Super solid company owned by some really cool folks. I love these bags.

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dude.jpgPost your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-half-bag.jpg

    I stashed the following gear on bike, as I did not wear a backpack.

    1. Escape Bivy
    2. 2 water bottles
    3. 1 100oz bladder in frame bag
    4. Aquamira drops
    5. 1 bike shorts/jersey
    6. Rab down jacket
    7. Rain gear
    8. 2 wool socks
    9. 1 long sleeve wool shirt
    10. 1 wool long underwear
    11. Buff
    12. 1 warm pair of gloves
    13. Sunscreen
    14. Chamois cream
    15. Sunglasses
    16. Wipes
    17. Toothbrush/paste
    18. Phone
    19. Knife
    20. GPS
    21. Spot
    22. CTR data book
    23. Batteries
    24. Lube
    25. Fenix LD20 on my lid and Coast PX25 on the bars
    26. Tire boot, Hanger, Chain links, Multi-tool, 2 tubes, Pump, Brake pads, Zip ties, Tube patch kit, First Aid Kit, Duct tape

    I think this next year I will try and trim the list down just a bit, but it is already fairly tight. Let me know if you guys have any questions!

    Jerry

  63. #463
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    That frame bag looks the business

  64. #464
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ottocat View Post
    That frame bag looks the business
    Ottocat, yep, the Oveja framebag is sweet. That is their stock frame bag, but they also do some really cool custom bags. I can't recommend them enough.

    Schnee, that looks like a great trip! Good luck!

  65. #465
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    i haven't done any bikepacking yet, however in preparation of doing a tour on my fat bike (my choice)

    but anywho heres a shot of it with all bags except the handlebar...


    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_5312.jpg

  66. #466
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    testing a (nearly) full load


    Untitled by mbeganyi, on Flickr


    Untitled by mbeganyi, on Flickr


    Untitled by mbeganyi, on Flickr


    Untitled by mbeganyi, on Flickr


    Untitled by mbeganyi, on Flickr


    Untitled by mbeganyi, on Flickr

  67. #467
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    Is the Pug as well as the Fargo or is it a replacement???

  68. #468
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    Quote Originally Posted by satanas View Post
    Is the Pug as well as the Fargo or is it a replacement???

    indy fab (skinny, road and rando and lite camping), fargo (chubby, dirt road, fun, single track, bikepacking), pugsley (fat, mountain bike, snow, fun, and now bikepacking)...


  69. #469
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    My Krampus

    Here is my Krampus set up for S24O.




    My hemp Tilley ends up on the rear bag because I forget I have it on my head until I out my helmet on and everything is already closed up.







    And a couple of pictures from the urban woods where I guerrilla camp:



  70. #470
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    Took the Troll out in the Judean Mountains...it enjoyed the rocky dirt roads of the Holy Land very much.







    Full ride report here: November 2013: S24O, Jerusalem Mountains - Julian Bender - Travels and Photos

    Packing list:

    Handlebar roll:
    Big Agnes Fly Creek UL1 tent
    Thermarest XLite sleeping pad
    Extra clothes (not many in this case - no rain and mild temps expected)
    Inflatable pillow

    Pocket on handlebar:
    Deodorant
    Trowel (of course, the ground is kind of too hard to dig in, but whatever)
    Kindle
    MP3 player
    Headlamp and spare batteries
    Granola Bars

    Front "gas tank":
    First aid kit
    Chain lube
    Hand sanitizer

    Rear "gas tank" (it's supposed to fit between the seatpost and chainstays, but sits on top of the rack stays just fine too):
    Hygiene stuff - toothbrush/paste, contacts and solution, soap, bug spray

    Frame pack main pocket:
    Food
    some water
    gas canister
    stove
    Notebook
    Topo trail map (this particular one is too big to fit in the side pocket, which is actually meant for maps)

    Frame pack side pocket:
    Tools, patch kit

    Stuff sack on rear rack:
    Pot set
    Quilt (Hammock Gear 20 degree down)
    More food


    If I were smart I would have rolled up my 10oz day pack and strapped it on top of the rear stuff sack, and then when the rack bolts failed I would have had the backpack as a backup; plus a light daypack is always good to have. Oh well, live and learn.

    Gear notes:

    Thermarest Gear View dry bag works extremely well for a handlebar roll - previously I'd been using the green Sea to Summit bag that's on the rear now, but the Thermarest is a bit narrower and just somehow fits everything better - much more stable and less flopping around.

    Handlebar Sling and Pocket are Revelate...too bad the Sling is discontinued; it was less than half the cost of the Harness that he's still making, and afaik works just as well for moderate loads.

    Frame packs are by Greg Wheelwright/Bolder Bikepacking Gear...great stuff and he was very good to work with.

    Bottle cages on the fork are by Two Fish. They came with velcro straps to attach to the fork, but those just weren't stable at all; now I'm using hose clamps instead, which are rock solid. The cages themselves are great and hold bottles like glue. The King Cage top cap bottle mount is also excellent for expanding water capacity, although I lost my third bottle on a bus and haven't replaced it yet...
    www.julianbender.net

    Pictures of bike trips, hikes, and other travels

  71. #471
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    pugsley and contrail by mbeganyi, on Flickr



    IMG_2184 by mbeganyi, on Flickr


    From a 2 day trip.


    Bikepacking List Fall

    Personal:
    Glasses
    Contact Case
    Sunglasses
    Maps / Cue card
    Phone
    Wallet
    Knife

    Electronics:
    Spot
    GPS
    Camera
    Batteries AAA and AA
    Headlamp
    Fenix flashlight
    Dinotte on bike

    Meds:
    First aid kit
    Tums
    Ibuprofen
    TP
    Shovel
    Wipes
    Lantiseptic

    Cook Kit:
    Stove
    Pot
    Cup
    Screen
    Stand
    Alcohol / esbit tabs
    Bear bag with line
    Fire starter / matches
    Spork


    Food:
    As req'd


    Hydration:
    Cut down dirty platy bottle
    Water bladder(s)
    Aqua Mira drops
    Nuun tabs


    Shelter:
    Contrail
    Poles
    Stakes
    Sleeping bag
    Sleeping pad
    Liner
    Reflective bubble sit pad / food insulator

    Bike Mech:
    Tube
    Patch kit
    Tire boot
    Tire levers
    Pump
    Multitool
    Derailler hanger (if Fargo)
    Brake pads (1 set)
    Zip ties
    Electrical tape
    Chain Lube
    Shift cable
    Brake cable

    Clothes:
    Boxers
    Cycling gloves (split fingers)
    Dry gloves
    Hat
    Dry Socks
    Patagonia puff
    Rain pants
    Showers Pass jacket


    On body:
    Black jacket
    Windstopper pant
    Cycling shorts
    Socks
    Boots
    Rapha jersey (got to be fashionable)
    Thin woolie
    Thin cap
    Helmet

  72. #472
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    Starting to look like a touring bike. Doing the GDMBR south to north this summer.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/saddleupbike/10875428835/" title="Rocky Mountain Trailhead by SaddleUpBike, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7364/10875428835_eacdcfcc03_c.jpg" width="800" height="600" alt="Rocky Mountain Trailhead"></a>

  73. #473
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    ^^ It does have a certain "touring bike" look to it
    I`ve never seen a front rack anything like yours. What is it and how does it mount?
    Recalculating....

  74. #474
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbphilly View Post
    Took the Troll out in the Judean Mountains...it enjoyed the rocky dirt roads of the Holy Land very much.


    Full ride report here: November 2013: S24O, Jerusalem Mountains - Julian Bender - Travels and Photos
    Great write-up, Julian!
    I think I read about your rack bolt dilema on Crazyguy. I need to go back and cruise the rest of your website- am embarrased to admit it, but I would never have expected such beautiful scenery and well mapped trails in that area. I take it mortars and landmines aren`t a big concern?
    Recalculating....

  75. #475
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Great write-up, Julian!
    I think I read about your rack bolt dilema on Crazyguy. I need to go back and cruise the rest of your website- am embarrased to admit it, but I would never have expected such beautiful scenery and well mapped trails in that area. I take it mortars and landmines aren`t a big concern?
    Thanks!

    Yeah, it's a really beautiful region. Today I'm going hiking from some mostly un-excavated Roman ruins in the West Bank (Sebastia) up to a mountain with some sheikh's tomb on top...it's not like Montana or Colorado but it's got its own beauty and history to go along with it.

    On the Israeli side, landmines are only a potential issue in the Golan Heights, and even then, areas that might be mined are fenced off and well-marked. I don't know of Jordan or Egypt having any landmine issues, and I've unfortunately not been to Syria or Lebanon...
    www.julianbender.net

    Pictures of bike trips, hikes, and other travels

  76. #476
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saddle Up View Post
    Starting to look like a touring bike. Doing the GDMBR south to north this summer.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/saddleupbike/10875428835/" title="Rocky Mountain Trailhead by SaddleUpBike, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7364/10875428835_eacdcfcc03_c.jpg" width="800" height="600" alt="Rocky Mountain Trailhead"></a>
    Hey SaddleUp, I'm curious why this bike over your Troll or LHT. It looks solid either way. Cool bike.

  77. #477
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    ^^ It does have a certain "touring bike" look to it
    I`ve never seen a front rack anything like yours. What is it and how does it mount?
    The rack is from Salsa, two racks actually. The top part is their Minimalist, the botton the Down Under. Here is a shot without the bags.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/saddleupbike/10875411055/" title="Rocky Mountain Trailhead by SaddleUpBike, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3722/10875411055_2dbe4e5fa8_c.jpg" width="800" height="600" alt="Rocky Mountain Trailhead"></a>

  78. #478
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saddle Up View Post
    Here is a shot without the bags.
    I can see clearly now, the bags is gone...

    Thanks.
    Recalculating....

  79. #479
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saddle Up View Post
    Starting to look like a touring bike. Doing the GDMBR south to north this summer.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/saddleupbike/10875428835/" title="Rocky Mountain Trailhead by SaddleUpBike, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7364/10875428835_eacdcfcc03_c.jpg" width="800" height="600" alt="Rocky Mountain Trailhead"></a>
    I've ridden the CDN GDR with panniers and the whole time I wished I had soft bags. Went home and ordered some!

    I found with panniers and racks I had to baby the bike and find the smoothest lines. Not to mention I had way too much weight/gear with me which was an issue on its own.

    With soft bags I can ride ride my bike like it's a MTB and have a lot more fun without thinking about the cargo at all.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  80. #480
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    Ha ha, different perspectives. I rode the CDN GDR and ordered another set of panniers, a handlebar bag and lower rack as soon as I got home.
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/saddleupbike/8531379759/" title="Great Divide Canada by SaddleUpBike, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8238/8531379759_4fb91f5472_c.jpg" width="800" height="600" alt="Great Divide Canada"></a>

  81. #481
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    Quote Originally Posted by vaultbrad View Post
    Hey SaddleUp, I'm curious why this bike over your Troll or LHT. It looks solid either way. Cool bike.

  82. #482
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    On One Scandal with Alfine 8

    Been bikepacking now about 6 years. Traditionally took my dually with a Old Man Mountain back rack. A few months ago built up a 29er Scandal hard tail with an Alfine 8 for bikepacking duties. Took it out for it's first over nighter last weekend into Australia's alpine region, (Jagungal Wilderness). Was very happy with the set up. Alfine 8 was also great:

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-scandal-4-bk-side.jpg

    Alpkit heavy duty dry bags on front and back.

    A few more pics here:

    Scandal 29er build with Alfine 8

  83. #483
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    I did the Co-Ut hut to hut trip and my entrada front bar bag worked great, the weight up front was key .Entrada handlebar bag with Pocket Panel option / Bedrock Bags and Packs I's actually up for grabs used once !!!!! 65 retail was - 150
    contact Dpardy917@att.net

  84. #484
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    Is this cheating?


  85. #485
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    I doubt it.

    it could be considered cheating; but then again, we have the same kind of prejudice for touring rigs when people are using old steel racks/baskets or similar stuff as opposed to the ultra-light stuff that's popular now...

    now you know what would be truly EPIC?

    jumping out of a plane with a Montague folder in your bags and then bike pack from the landing zone using the parachute materials as your shelters
    CamoDeafie's Tactical gear and bike-packing blog-
    http://sbtactical.wordpress.com/

  86. #486
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    Oops.

  87. #487
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    Here's a build that one of the members of the Cycle Monkey crew came up with when he set out to build the ultimate adventure touring rig. Came out pretty great, if I do say so myself!

    Build highlights:

    Surly Krampus with belt drive splitter welded in mid-chainstay
    Rohloff/Gates belt drivetrain
    Fox F29 fork
    Brooks B17
    Cane Creek Thudbuster
    Revelate Designs bags

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-kramp2-1-.jpg
    www.CycleMonkey.com
    Rohloff & Schlumpf gearing. Custom wheels. Suspension service.

  88. #488
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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleMonkey View Post
    Here's a build that one of the members of the Cycle Monkey crew came up with when he set out to build the ultimate adventure touring rig. Came out pretty great, if I do say so myself!

    Build highlights:

    Surly Krampus with belt drive splitter welded in mid-chainstay
    Rohloff/Gates belt drivetrain
    Fox F29 fork
    Brooks B17
    Cane Creek Thudbuster
    Revelate Designs bags

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Oh my bikes done! It looks great. I'll just send you my address! drool!!! Wow that is gorgeous. A dream bike packing set up for sure!

  89. #489
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    Quote Originally Posted by drews256 View Post
    Oh my bikes done! It looks great. I'll just send you my address! drool!!! Wow that is gorgeous. A dream bike packing set up for sure!
    Yep, it's a dream bike for sure. Coveted by all of us here.
    www.CycleMonkey.com
    Rohloff & Schlumpf gearing. Custom wheels. Suspension service.

  90. #490
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    Come to think of it, here's another 29+ build we did recently. No bikepacking gear yet, but the frame is custom built with a longer rear end for offroad touring. Check it out:

    The Monkey Lab: Twenty2 Cycles Belt Drive Rohloff 29+

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-twentytwo29-_wholebike_main.jpg
    www.CycleMonkey.com
    Rohloff & Schlumpf gearing. Custom wheels. Suspension service.

  91. #491
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    From my last bikepacking trip, lunch stop.

  92. #492
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    Re: Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)

    Quote Originally Posted by SuPrBuGmAn View Post


    From my last bikepacking trip, lunch stop.
    Looks like florida ?

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

  93. #493
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    Quote Originally Posted by murf99 View Post
    Looks like florida ?

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk
    Apalachicola National Forest You must have recognized that pine tree.

  94. #494
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    Getting the word out about a Threadless stem shifter adapter I have been working on. Here is a pic of it on my Krampus. I am building up a ECR this next week and will post a better picture of the shifter on a bike that it is designed for. I will hopefully be bringing these to market in the next 6 months or so. They will work with loads of vintage down tube shifters along with all Shimano bar ends and most Taiwan style thumb shifters. The whole adapter will be made in the USA.Click image for larger version. Name: Stem shifter.Attachment 861924

  95. #495
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    The new Mukluk in winter bikepacking mode.
    My outdoor blog: www.yetirides.com

  96. #496
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    Name:  ECR.jpg
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    My ECR almost done.

  97. #497
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    Is anyone rockin' Thule's new pack n pedal product? I know it wouldn't handle huge trips but I work at a shop and would love to see if anyone has their hands on it and can provide feedback. I have a full suspension 29er, I was looking pretty close at using their new rear rack (seen here: Thule Pack ’n Pedal Tour Rack - Thule). I am using one on my commuter currently.. but I haven't started looking into bike packing just recently. I would love to see some pictures if anyone does.

    Thanks,

    Pfox
    ------__o
    ----_`\<,_
    ---(_)/ (_)

  98. #498
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    The qbp rep showed us all that stuff a while back and its good stuff for sure. I would say the quality is close to ortilieb.

  99. #499
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)

    The rack was acquired from a New Zealand company and was called Freeride prior to 2013. Many folks down under use this rack for bikepacking with great success. Whether Thule's version is as tough is a question I have had. I am planning to get one to switch between commuter and bikepacker riding as my OMM won't fit my 29ers...

  100. #500
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfox90 View Post
    Is anyone rockin' Thule's new pack n pedal product? I know it wouldn't handle huge trips but I work at a shop and would love to see if anyone has their hands on it and can provide feedback. I have a full suspension 29er, I was looking pretty close at using their new rear rack (seen here: Thule Pack ’n Pedal Tour Rack - Thule). I am using one on my commuter currently.. but I haven't started looking into bike packing just recently. I would love to see some pictures if anyone does.

    Thanks,

    Pfox
    Thule Freeload Bike Rack Availability
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

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